If it is Held in Secret, It’s Only a Half Truth

Truth isn't hidden

By Cathy Eck

 

Secret Truth?

It was said that initiates were sworn to secrecy with strict penalties for breaking their vows.  But I question that.  Keeping the truth secret goes against the very idea of initiation, which was to remember the truth and live it.  You can’t hide something if you’re living it.

Initiates realized that everyone was born with the truth inside.  To hide the truth, you must cover it with beliefs or knowledge; and initiates had no need for beliefs or knowledge.

 

Where Did the Truth Go?

The truth didn’t go anywhere; it got covered up.  People who wanted power often entered secret brotherhoods and learned an occult view of life, which has become the normal view of life (or the illusion).  These brotherhoods were NOT creating initiates, but they called themselves initiates.  Hence, the confusion.  Initiation literally means to take one back to who they were in the beginning, their True Self.  The occult teachings created a facade that looked much like a True Self.  The occult thought they had the truth, and still do; but they were and still are jealous and fearful of the true initiates’ real power.

The occult memorized the initiates’ unified words of truth (and their stories) without letting go of the false beliefs in sin, suffering, and problems that they already held in mind.  This turned pure wisdom into useless knowledge (or manure into an iced cream sundae).  To the innocent, the occult looked like initiates.  But the occult cast a long shadow because of their split minds.

This is how level confusion was created.  Level confusion is where we put truth into the illusion, or where we muddy the clear waters of truth by giving it an opposite.  The triangle process demonstrates that truth and the false illusion are two distinct levels of reality.  Confusion occurs when we mix these levels.  This is being done today by most teachers of spirituality and religion; and many innocent people are being fooled.  When we follow someone with level confusion, we get level confusion.

The occult version of the truth was made secret; and of course, people want secrets.  The occult taught things like thinking positive thoughts, the use of magic, visualization, and controlling or willing the mind.  But they didn’t know how to purify the mind — only true initiates knew and taught that.

The occult only had power because of the use of roles.  The good, positive, unemotional side of the occult secret information was  identified with the powerful masculine roles, which were played by those in the occult brotherhoods and religions.  The bad, emotional, negative, or lesser desired side of the illusion, was projected on those playing feminine roles, or everyone else.  The occult also used a lot of power words and symbols, which they claimed had magical power.   Their symbols and beliefs were charged by the innocent believers.  Without believers, symbols and beliefs are empty and worthless.  Initiates didn’t use symbols, nor did they have beliefs, but they often used metaphor in their stories.

 

Finding the Truth Within

To write my first blog article years ago, I had to confront what seemed like an unending fear of the illusion, the occult, and those with power; it took a lot of letting go.  I felt as if I held the entire history of people being tortured, humiliated, or killed for exposing the occult with in my own mind and body.  Today conspiracy theorists and comedians are exposing the occult.  They tend to be people who feel the incongruence of the false leaders; they know something is off.

Of course, I also expose the occult; but I add letting go, which is the way back to the pure view of the initiates.  In order to succeed at initiation, we must become stronger than our minds, expose our own false beliefs, and let them go.  The occult simply use techniques to change their minds.  When we expose and let go of our own false beliefs, we gain in true strength and power; only then can we see through the illusion to freedom.

At one point, I believed that I needed to find the truth in a secret organization.  But my True Self fortunately thought ahead.  I realized that if I got the truth from such an organization, assuming they even had it, I’d be sworn to secrecy.  I also didn’t see (or I should say feel) the type of people I was looking for coming out of those organizations.  Besides, I didn’t just want the secrets for me;  I wanted them for everyone.  In hindsight, I made a very good decision.

The reason I can be so blunt and confident is because I earned what I write about by letting go.  I found the truth inside of me as was done in the true temples of initiation through mentorship.  I write to provide others with validation and techniques for letting go, not to provide information to memorize or use to look knowledgeable.  I can’t emphasize this enough.  If you’re still seeing an opposite to your truth, let go of that which you think is the truth because it isn’t.  It’s a occult clone voice.

 

No Secrets

After years of letting go,  I know that true initiates didn’t keep secrets.  Therefore, all secret information is occult; and you don’t need it or want it.  It’s worthless knowledge.  Knowledge is good for unimportant stuff like learning to type or how to make a chair.  But even the best knowledge can’t be magically turned into wisdom and truth.

The initiates didn’t have to keep anything secret; I’ve followed in their footsteps.  You get more of whatever you live and give.   When you give occult bullshit or half truths, you get more bullshit.  When I give away what I’ve come to know, more comes — just like a steady paycheck.  Much as I try, I can’t give it away as fast as it comes.  But I keep trying because the reward is so damn sweet!

 

Buying Freedom or Earning Freedom

Freedom is earned, not bought

By Cathy Eck

 

Most people associate freedom with wealth or power.  There’s good reason for that.  The most joked about interpretation of the Golden Rule in the illusion is:  “Those with the gold make the rules.”

 

Buying Freedom

Recently, I saw a show on the History Channel about Billionaires.  They briefly addressed their mindset.  They said they have serious God complexes, and they believe they’re doing God’s work even if they’re robbing others blind or killing them.  They have a particular view of the world that they believe is true; and that view has them winning and most of us losing.

The show described this condition in several comical ways:  “Billionaires see themselves as the anointed landlords of the earth.  They see themselves as divinely appointed.  The world would stop spinning on its axis if they failed to exist.”

The show explained that billionaires look philanthropic and generous, but they have a motive with every dollar they spend.  Their charity is fixing what is wrong in their perspective of reality.  In other words, they’re fixing their own projection to perfect their OWN illusion.

The show even admitted that billionaires don’t want us vermin around; they’re now looking into a plan to build an exclusive floating island so they won’t belong to any country, won’t pay taxes, and will (in their mind) have achieved ultimate freedom.  But they’re living a lie; that’s not freedom.

 

Gaining Followers

Another illusory way to gain power and rule the world is to gain permanent followers for your perspective.  Religions, cults, and gurus create power for their beliefs through followers.   Luke Rhinehart wrote a book in the 70’s called “the Book of est.”  It described the mindset of est founder and leader, Werner Erhard.  Erhard borrowed ideas from eastern gurus and the infamous cult leader, L. Ron Hubbard.

“The est organization is not democratic (most American business organizations are not) but rather is authoritarian in the way that baffles many and antagonizes others. Warner Erhard expects staff members to be dedicated to serving est–which, because he and est are one and the same, mean serving him. Late in the fourth day of the training, the trainer explains that Werner is in essence a power source serving masses of people, and individual staff members supply Warner with additional power. The power flows up from graduates and staff, through Warner, out into the world. This is a perfectly reasonable way to explain the essentially Eastern phenomenon of a powerful being (usually a guru or spiritual teacher) attracting other powerful beings who nevertheless choose to channel their power through the leader” (Rhinehart, pg. 264-65).  

 

This is the way of the false god.  We’re so used to our reality being this way that we fall for the trick again and again.

Government authority uses a similar trick.  We send our power up to them believing they’ll take care of us.  People today are noticing that they aren’t doing a very good job of taking care of anyone but themselves.

Notice the flow of energy goes from the followers to the leaders.  This screams false leader; he will assure you that he has your back.  But the true leader operates from unconditional love; his/her energy flows like the sun to those below them in feminine roles.  True leaders constantly examine their projections and correct their own minds.  Lao Tzu said it best, A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: we did it ourselves.”

 

Earned Freedom

The freedom that we gain from letting go is earned freedom; it’s real and indestructible.  Just as it takes time and effort to become a billionaire or grow millions of followers, letting go takes time and effort.  But here’s the difference.  The billionaire and the cult leader must retain their superior masculine position.  They must constantly lobby for top dog if they want their beliefs and rules to control everyone’s experience.  They consciously or unconsciously realize that they have no power in the feminine role.  They’ll do whatever it takes to stay in the masculine role — steal, kill, torture, silence.  They’re doing the “false god’s” work.

Letting go moves us into the realm of the True Self, beyond roles, which is ultimately more powerful than any religious leader, guru, government official, or billionaire.  We really do control our life because their beliefs aren’t in our mind anymore.   We can’t experience what we don’t believe.  The false gods aren’t our enemies; they’re powerless.  They’re own false self is the vermin they want to eliminate.

If we don’t let go of their rules and beliefs in our mind, we’ll fall under their control.  This is why we’ve had great men and women who took risks, but ended up in prison or dead.  They believed they were fighting a real enemy instead of a cartoon.  The movie, “Divergent,” has some great visuals of the power of knowing something isn’t true.  Readers of my blog tend to recognize their “divergent” True Self,  which the movie defines as a mind beyond control.  Divergence requires persistent letting go.  As we conquer this aspect of our false mind, we won’t fear stepping out and speaking the truth anymore.

When we understand true freedom, we understand why it’s worth pursuing, and why it’s completely fair.  The wealthy person and the religious leader or guru are also bound by their own version of the false God.  By letting go, we move beyond their false illusion into real freedom, a place with no boundaries — the realm of our True Selves.

The best indicator of true freedom is that people work together and harmonize.  They don’t play status games.  Everyone is unique, valuable, and worthy.  In true freedom, people aren’t afraid of each other; they don’t harm others.  They’re too busy creating.  And while the billionaire and the guru do get to do what they want, they still fear the vermin outside the commune or mansion (their projections).  Their freedom is an illusion.

What If I Like My Beliefs? What Do I do With Annoying Believers? Etc.

apple a day

By Cathy Eck

 

Beliefs and Believers

Beliefs aren’t really a problem if we truly understand that they’re all false. Believers of all sorts fear other peoples’ beliefs; they think the others’ beliefs can affect them.  Beliefs can’t affect us unless we believe them.  Really!  Likewise, prophecy only affects people who accept it as true.

This wisdom makes life inherently fair.  But believers do need opposition to take their imaginary punishments.  For a long time, I feared believers; that fear cast me into unwanted roles within their illusions.  Once I no longer believed them, they lost their false power over me.

People with strong beliefs challenge us during initiation.   They show us what we still believe.  That’s a valuable service.  We also get to practice not judging them for having beliefs.  They’re living a false illusion; but they aren’t bad.

Beliefs die a natural death without human fuel.  Consequently, believers hate when we ignore them; but too often we argue with them.  Arguing puts us on their false level.  We lose when they say we offend them.  We’ll lose if they trigger doubt in us by pulling out an out-of-context Bible verse.  Many Food Police would reel me in with their charisma as they talked about their bullshit belief of the day.  Believers are always armed and ready to defend their beliefs.

Resist their pull to battle; it only gives them power.  Just realize that their beliefs are false and let them go.  In this way, you stay in power.  You see, us nonbelievers aren’t psychologically reversed like them, we feel the emotions that they should feel since they just lied.  But they believe they spoke the one-and-only truth — they feel nothing.  In most any battle, the emotional person loses.  Chances are, that will be us.

However, if we discriminate and let go, the emotions we feel leave us and return to their source — the believer.  If we stay in our True Self, said believer must deal with their own emotions.  If we’re wise, we give them what they fear most — unconditional love.  Pure love dissolves anything false.  It’s the most powerful weapon in the universe.  I never attack a believer; but if they attack me, I shoot them with love.  They hate it.

 

What if We Can’t Let Go?

There’s no belief you can’t let go.  However, letting go often takes time.  What if you’re in an urgent situation, like a health crisis?  You can feel lost between two worlds.  The best and safest thing to do is to honestly admit that you don’t believe you can let go right now; follow your beliefs to the letter.  Do whatever you believe will result in healing the effects.  After the crisis is over, let go around that subject until you release the causal belief.  Regardless of what you’re told by experts, the problem will disappear and not return when you no longer hold the causal belief in mind.

My biggest surprise around letting go, and what comes as a shock to people I mentor, is that any situation that we didn’t fix at the cause earlier in life will come up again in initiation.  If we had a physical problem earlier in life, it’s wise to look at the beliefs that caused that problem while our health is still good and our mind clear.  If we had relationship problems that we fixed with therapy or boundaries, get ready!  People often get upset when they regain the weight they once lost through dieting and exercise.  They fixed the effect, not the cause.  We’ll probably meet these problems again, but now we’ll know how to let go.  This time, we’ll remove the cause.

 

Can I keep my religion?

Of course. You won’t be completely free, but you can keep it.  I recommend that anyone with a tradition, practice, or religion, which they believe they want to keep, should live it fully, honestly, and completely.  Do it exactly as prescribed.  Don’t cheat.  In that way, you’ll see it for what it is.

When you practice a tradition, practice, or religion selectively, you’re not really following the tradition.  You pick up all of the beliefs of that tradition, yet don’t follow the protocol — that’s dangerous.  Many people make up their own rebellious rules or beliefs — not realizing that their modifications have no power against the fundamentalists’ beliefs.

If you live any belief system fully without cheating and still like it, then keep it.  But don’t become a zealot.  Even if it works for you, it’s still a belief system; it’s unfair to force others to accept your beliefs.

 

Challenging Beliefs

Many of us were taught to never challenge another person’s beliefs.  It’s certainly not good to argue over beliefs since we get the cooties of the person we argue with.  But we must challenge the beliefs within our own minds.

If another person has beliefs, and they’re happy with them, then I just make sure that I don’t believe them and infect my mind.  However, if they ask me to listen to their problems, to help them fix their problems, or to take care of them in some way, then that’s a request for help.  I give them support by helping them find their causal belief and let that belief go.  I’m not a caretaker.  If they don’t want their belief challenged, then they can fix their own problem.  I won’t fix their effects.  Jesus demonstrated this by “letting the dead bury the dead.”  In other words, those in the illusion can take care of the illusion’s problems.

Generally, I’ll only help another clean up their mess if they let go since I know the problem won’t happen again.  When people are forced to take responsibility for the effects of their beliefs, they often choose to let go.  My methods sound cruel to some, but they’re not.  In my experience, when I hold people to the truth, they often rise to the occasion.  When I rescue someone who’s drowning, I usually drown with them.

Roles: Internal and External

Roles in our mind

By Cathy Eck

 

False Self

Our mind works like a movie projector to create our view of the world.  We experience what we’re projecting with our body.  If we only had a True Self, we’d live in the Garden of Eden.  But watching fruit grow on trees is boring.  So we create stories.

Reality equals the True Self plus our Beliefs (false self)

A good metaphor for the false self (as designed) is temporary storage.  The True Self is permanent storage.  One person creates a story within their mind.  This person splits up their mind into multiple characters that interact, but all the characters exist within the story writer’s mind, forming an illusory creative whole.  The storyteller brings that inner creation into the outer world via “The Word.”  At this point, the story writer is done.  Now humans co-create to perform the story, and they’re thrilled to do that because it’s fun, and it’s just a role.  They get to walk in someone else’s shoes for a short time.  Each actor is a valuable part of the whole.  If a few actors don’t show up, the story would dissolve.

Hollywood does this perfectly; it’s a haven for creativity.  Business people also create visions then bring others in to play roles within the vision.  No one is chained to these visions for life.  When they finish their role, they delete the story.  Their minds are virgin again.

Religion is different.  Someone creates  a story, and they make it true.  They cast people into roles that never end.  It’s like the “Hotel California.”  “You can check out anytime you like, but you can never leave.”  Why?  You forgot that you could let go of the role.

We love story.  We don’t care how wild and crazy the story is.  Actors play horrible roles, but they don’t become the characters permanently.  When the role is done, they drop it because they view it as a temporary role — it’s not who they are.

Roles aren’t the problem.  The problem is the belief that we are our roles or that we can’t let them go.  Roles come with beliefs so they cause us to retain beliefs that we don’t need or want.

 

The Illusion

In the illusion, the lead masculine role casts the story and then convinces others that they must play the roles they’re cast in for life.  No wonder we want to die.  They give us the shit roles while they get the A-list parts.  Most people are playing roles in a story that they didn’t create and don’t really like — no great actor would do that.

We came here to create stories and play roles — for sure.  But we don’t have the right to make lifetime roles — that is why the Lifetime channel makes crappy movies.

 

Getting Free of Roles

To get free, we must identify who’s playing the masculine role of the screenplay we’re cast in.  What do they want from us?  What do they define as good or right?  What beliefs have we accepted because of that role?  As we let go of the beliefs around the role, we gradually step back until one day we can see the big picture from the director’s chair.  We see that our role is just a role.  It isn’t our destiny, purpose, or karma.  We don’t have to play it anymore.

Then we’ll see that everyone in the illusory play was an actor, even our worst enemy.  We’ll applaud them, not hate them.  They probably didn’t choose their role either.  Most people today are playing roles cast by their ancestors in a story that was written thousands of years ago.  We’re afraid to quit our roles because we think God gave them to us.  The story writers said their stories were cast by God so we’d accept a role that sucked.  Can you see how fucking stupid that is?

The illusion feels like hell believes everyone identifies with their role.  The think they are a Jew, Christian, or Lightworker.  But they aren’t.  It’s a role.

We don’t let go because we become vested in the story.  Let’s look at the story of Armageddon.  Those who believe that the story was created by God won’t let it go.  They want the story to play out to the end, and they believe that they’ll be the victors in a win-lose drama of epic quality.  They’ve become so absorbed and proud of their role that they don’t feel their own misery.  They have no compassion for those who will lose.

They’ve lost access to their True Self and can’t see beyond the set.  Some people escape but find another role without first becoming free of the old one.  “I’ll take this role where I get to ascend to the stars.  Or I’ll join this religion where I get to live as a monk and not work in a job I hate everyday.”  They’re making a lateral move within the illusion.  They aren’t getting free.  This creates conflicting roles in their mind.

 

Hollywood

The answer is in Hollywood.  We’re all actors.  We take a part in a marriage, culture, religion, business, or political group; and when we’ve had enough, we should simply let go and drop the role without guilt, shame, or fear of judgment.  We’d return to home base — our True Self.

If we want a different role, we first clear out the old role.  We can’t play Forest Gump if we’re still playing Idi Amin.  Once we’ve broken free of old roles, we’re back to zero again.  We’ll choose new roles and only play characters in stories that we love.  We’ll make sure we trust our director.  Or we’ll write our own story.

But what about those collective dramas that have unhappy endings like Monsanto, Armageddon, or businesses that harm the earth.  This answer is on Broadway.  How many actors does a play have to lose before the show can’t go on?  We’re those actors; we can drop our roles and eventually bring down the production.

How Roles Affect Letting Go (Part II – Feminine Role)

Masculine Role

By Cathy Eck

 

Feminine Role

In the Feminine Role, we let go of the beliefs that our authorities/experts impose on us.

We act as their reflection until we let go. 

 

Read the above words related to the feminine role.  See why no one wants to be feminine?  When roles were created by the patriarchy, they modeled the masculine after the sun.  The feminine role was modeled after the moon, which is nothing without the sun’s reflection.

Positive thinking, affirmations, even logic, etc. don’t work for the feminine role because the feminine role doesn’t appear to have power to change their mind.  Often, as a feminine reflection, we don’t hear any words or beliefs; we only feel the emotion related to the belief.  People often say, “I can’t find the causal beliefs.  I just feel endless emotions.”  That means they’re stuck deep in a feminine role.  They’re the effect of an authority’s beliefs.

Psychology was mostly developed by men.  When therapists view projection, they believe that everyone projects.  But when we’re in the feminine role, we don’t project, we receive.  If you want to drive someone insane, tell them they’re projecting when they’re actually receiving your projection.  It feels like you’re in the movie Gaslight.  We’ll search our mind endlessly to find out how we’re projecting and won’t find the answer.  In a moment of personal desperation, I decided to follow my emotions.  Eventually, I ended up at the causal belief in what felt like the person’s mind who played the masculine role and said I was projecting on them.  Could I let this go?  Did I have the right to let go of what appeared to be his thought?  Damn right, I did, and then I felt relief like I ‘d never felt before.  I’d accidentally discovered the secret to letting go from the feminine role.

 

Confusing Masculine Program

There’s a confusing program that exists in almost every masculine false mind (we all have one).  When the masculine role is projecting, they often blame the feminine role for what they are doing.  For example, I had someone say that I rejected them.  I didn’t think I rejected them, but they were sure I did.  After I understood this false-self pattern and roles, I saw that they were rejecting me while telling me I was rejecting them.  Once you can recognize this pattern, you’ll find your sanity level goes up dramatically.

The means to exit feminine roles was hidden because people in masculine roles need the feminine to be powerless so they have a nice projection screen for their shadow.  They won’t let us off the hook; we must let ourself off the hook.  

At first, this feels strange almost like you’re cheating or doing something devious.  That’s part of the trap; you have every right to delete anything you want from your mind.  It often feels like you’ve gone into another person’s mind.  But you’re actually still within your own masculine mind aspect, which has become the mirror image of the mind of the person in the masculine role.

Freedom from feminine roles requires using your emotions as they were designed.  As long as the feminine role thinks they’re flawed because they have emotions, they’re stuck.  When people in feminine roles realize that their emotions will lead them to the causal belief, and they can let that belief go, they have power.  Real power.  Nothing is incurable or impossible once we realize this.  The feminine regains it’s power over everyone and everything.  The masculine role loses its competitive advantage; it’s exposed.

 

The Process

First, we witness (watch) our emotions (not wallow in them).  The emotion is our feminine mind aspect within the illusion.  It’s the reflection or effect of the masculine false self.  So as we witness the emotion, we’re actually following the emotion to the causal belief.  Eventually, you’ll hear beliefs arise, and those are causal beliefs. Let them go even if they seem absolutely true.  Keep doing this until there’s no more emotion.  Sometimes the causal beliefs feel like they’re in our mind.  Other times, it will feel as if we’ve left our mind and entered the mind of the person in the masculine role.  Clairvoyants see this as cords of energy between the cause and effect.  Remember, we’ve actually never left our own mind.  You’ll see this with practice.

I usually address the beliefs I want to let go in words.  I’d say, “This belief doesn’t feel good (since I feel emotions), it isn’t true, so I’m letting go of my father’s belief that I’m lazy.”  That is how I do it.  There are no magic words.  I’m simply reminding myself of the truth — beliefs that generate emotion are false.  When we realize the belief isn’t true, it goes.  Other people use visualization or other words.  How you remove the belief is up to you.  Be creative; use your strengths.

Letting go from the feminine role doesn’t just improve our life, it improves the world.  But it does take practice, courage, willingness, and time.  As you get proficient, you can remove causal beliefs you accepted from any authority in your past or present.  If you feel like you’ve lived past lives, you can even take the causal belief out of yourself or others in the other life.  I used to do this in hypnotherapy sessions.  Now I teach people to do it themselves consciously.

Be patient!  The first time I did this, it probably took an hour or more before I heard the causal belief.  I decided that I was going to sit my ass down and follow the emotion until it took me to the cause.  I was willing to sit for days if necessary.  Fortunately it didn’t take that long.  When you succeed, you won’t believe the relief you’ll feel.

When we find the cause of our emotions and remove it, the emotions no longer have a purpose.  They disappear.  We become peaceful and calm.  We feel like a small part of us was reborn.

 

 

Exposing my Inner Comedian — Comedy is Honest

Steve Kaplan

By Cathy Eck

 

Comedy

I love comedy, but I’m not fond of jokes, silliness, or trickery.  I didn’t understand my perspective of comedy until I found Steve Kaplan.  So when I got an email saying that I could repeat his intensive at a very reduced rate, I jumped on it.

I must explain that if the Dali Lama was at the Starbuck’s across the street, I wouldn’t even twitch my leg.  But for Steve, I happily drove to LA.  I know my truth, but I didn’t know how my truth fit into the world of comedy.  I knew this was the next step in my quest for mental freedom, and I felt inspired to accept the role of student for a weekend.

Steve has done for comedy what I’ve done with beliefs.  Steve has watched endless comedy movies, studied the art of comedy throughout history, and most important, Steve has let go of everything that he thought he knew about comedy so that he could see with fresh eyes and hear with fresh ears.

 

7th Sense

Awhile back, I declared humor to be the seventh sense.  I knew that was true because when I could laugh at my past, I was free of it.  Laughter was like a super power.

According to Steve, humor and truth walk hand-in-hand.  Comedy is honest.  Comedy says what is natural, not what is expected or politically correct.

Last night, Bill Maher was on Jay Leno’s show.  Jay acknowledged Bill for being nominated for 32 Emmys, but never winning.  Jay said (paraphrased):  “Unlike most of us comedians who say that others like and want to hear, you say what others need to hear.  I hope I’m around when you finally get what you deserve.”  Bill is funny without making jokes; he says what is obvious and honest.  We laugh.  He has a job because so few people have the balls to say what is obvious.  Most of us fear humiliation or punishment.

For much of my life, I was surrounded by people who believed that “The truth hurts.”  My inner comedian said that the truth will set you free, but no one believed me.  I put my inner comedian on the shelf in my mid-twenties.  I’d just won the Toastmasters’ East Coast Comedy Competition.  But I couldn’t compete further because my boss wouldn’t let me off work, and my husband didn’t even know I’d competed.  They didn’t find me funny.  I figured that I had a deformed view of comedy.  I’d be better off not using it.  But that felt like part of me died.

Comedy is truthful in Steve Kaplan’s perspective, but it isn’t unkind.  I’d guess that Steve’s Jewish — most people in movies or Hollywood are.  Yet, he starts off his seminar telling a Hitler joke.  Then he says, “Why is a joke funny about a person who was responsible for killing 60,000,000 people?”  Steve didn’t say, “Hitler killed 6,000,000 Jews.”  He said, “Hitler killed 60,000,000 people.”  Steve recognizes as important and worthy 54,000,000 more people than the average Joe.  That’s why he can see into the depths of comedy — below the silly jokes.  The truth on any subject unites people and makes everyone worthy.

 

Beliefs

Given my focus in life, Steve blew me away when he walked up to a student and told him that he’d been looking at his stuff over lunch, and it sucked.  He went to a woman and said that he’d also looked at her writing, and it was amazing.  He was lying to both of them, and he later admitted that.  But the victims’ faces didn’t register lies even after he admitted lying.  The guy looked like he was going to cry; and the woman looked like she might lift off at any moment.

His point was that we believe words even when they’re lies. However, comedy happens when we tell the truth.  Comedy is the natural response for a particular situation and a particular character.  It’s what flies out of our mouth without going through our false-self editing process.

We’ve all lost our funny because we’re all trained to edit everything we say.  We look for what we should say, not what’s natural and true.  We even try to get into other people’s minds, where we don’t belong, so we can say what they expect.

Steve played a clip of a Soap Opera, “All My Children.”  A man and women were talking.  He explained that drama is unnatural.  People say what they need to say to look good, be strong, and be in control.  There’s the life lesson — the cause of drama.  Drama is the effect of people not saying what’s natural.  They say what will make them look good, right, in control, positive, expert, or spiritual.  The false self wants approval or control, not resolution of their problems, true love, or harmonic relationship.  Trying to get those false needs met creates drama, which ironically ends up costing the person the very approval and control they desire.

 

My Desire

Steve’s intensive validated what my True Self knew about comedy.  Initiation works that way.  You unveil the truth within you, and then you find others who validate your true perspective.

I wasn’t there to become Steve or memorize Steve’s words so I could quote them and sound knowledgeable.  I wasn’t there to find myself.  I wanted to be able to remember events of my past that I still held in mind in a dramatic way and allow them to transform into comedy.  When we can laugh at something; it has no power over us anymore.

Seriousness (gravity) is the demise of the True Self; it puts us in the grave.  Lightness (enlightenment) is comedy or seeing the funny in the false self.  The false self (illusion) is just one big lie pretending to be true.  It wants us to believe that the truth hurts, but it doesn’t.  When we laugh at the false self by telling the truth, we expose it and destroy it’s power.  It truly does set us free.

Turning False Good into True Good

True good versus false good

By Cathy Eck

 

False Good or True Good

False goodness is a big trap on the road to freedom.   What people consider good according to social standards isn’t real goodness because it has an opposite.  It’s based on blindly following social rules.  Consequently, many people look good when they aren’t good; often those that look bad are much closer to their True Self.   We see and hear what’s on the surface; we feel what’s hidden underneath.  False goodness should always produce emotions.  It’s our signal that what we’re hearing or seeing is false.

Many leaders, marketers, preachers, gurus, teachers, and inspirational speakers know the power of the false good mask.  You might even have friends or family who have a good mask.  You actually do them and yourself a favor when you stop falling for their act.  But often we fear what lies below the mask, so we refrain from exposing their shadow.  In my experience, people usually treat false good people much better than they treat those who are truly good because they’re afraid of the masters of the false good mask.  Most people have a deep fear of good people that they ignore because it makes no sense.

If we’re truly observant, we’ll see that what society labels good is the removal or fixing of emotions, which we think happens by fixing the problems (effects).  Mom feels lonely, so we go visit her.  Our boss is worried about our low numbers, so we work harder.  We’re taught that emotions are bad.  If we eliminate another’s emotions, we’re good.

But that’s the giant error of the illusion.  Emotions are the messenger that points to wrong thinking (beliefs).  We’re trained to shoot the messenger and ignore the causal beliefs.  Fixing mom’s loneliness or our boss’s worries isn’t our problem.  We aren’t the cause of their emotions; their beliefs are.

 

An Example

Our friend, Jane, feels ugly.  She’s put on twenty pounds since her divorce.  Stress lines cause her to look older.  She believes no one will love her again.

Sally is her friend.  Sally listens to Jane and sympathizes with her.   Jane likes the attention of Sally’s sympathy.  So they bond over Jane’s problem.  Sally has been trained to be nice so she says, “Jane, you don’t look bad.  What’s not to love about you? You’ll find love again.”  She tells Jane what Jane wants to hear.  She might also give Jane some beauty tips.  Or perhaps she offers to do a makeover for her.  Sally appears good because she temporarily removed Jane’s emotions.

Sally’s behavior is socially correct.  But she doesn’t help Jane one bit.  In order for Sally to inspire or fix Jane’s emotions, Sally has to hold Jane’s problems and beliefs in her mind as true.  She’s actually feeding Jane’s false self while appearing to be good, nice, and supportive.   If she gives Jane advice, she’s feeding Jane more beliefs.  Likewise, giving Jane a makeover will cause Jane to feel good for a day or two, but it won’t cure Jane’s false belief that she’s ugly.  Only letting go of the false causal belief will cure Jane.  Then she won’t need Sally to inspire her or help her feel good.  And therein lies the problem.  When we fix the causal belief, we don’t need others.  Codependence disappears.  We’ve got no one to serve.

Sally has been trained that to be kind and to serve is good and righteous.  She feels good when she fixes Jane’s problem or offers advice because she tells herself that she made Jane happy.  She didn’t make Jane happy.  In truth, Sally covered up Jane’s emotional indicator.  She helped her to look away from the cause so now it’s unlikely that the problem will ever go away.

Of course, Sally does wish Jane well.  She did what she was trained to do; she was taught that good people inspire and serve others.  Real service and true good eventually puts the server out of a job.

When we open our eyes, we realize that what society labels good is actually harmful.

This understanding cures us of self-help gurus and expensive experts.  It isn’t anyone’s job to inspire or fix even one other.  But we can all help others to find their own inspiration and wisdom by pushing them to let go of their causal beliefs and by letting go of the beliefs we hold in our mind about them.

 

The Escape

More people are trapped by good than bad.   If we’ve gotten stuck in someone’s heroic mission, bought into their get-rich-quick scheme, or play the black sheep in our family, we have to find the beliefs in us that keep us stuck in their illusion.  We probably won’t convince the person with the good mask to free us.  Ask yourself: “What you think you need or want?  What are you hoping to fix?  What emotions are you trying to get rid of?  What do you think they can do that you can’t?”

If we fall for get-rich-quick schemes, we have a belief in lack.  If we’re desperate for a teacher or healer, spent lots of money on the psychic hotline, or have an addiction to self-help books, we believe that we don’t know the answer or can’t heal ourselves.  If we hold on to family or friends that mistreat us, we fear being alone.  Hidden beliefs are wrapped in emotions so it’s never comfortable to dive into them.  But when we see the beliefs and let them go, we’ve eliminated the cause.  We no longer need the product or service.  The solution will actually look worthless because it is.

We’re often labeled rude or uncaring when we stop blindly obeying the socially-defined good rules.  Those who win with the social system, have to make us wrong to keep themselves right.  But when we heal this confusion within ourselves, we become truly good and authentic — our own false good mask disappears.  Then we never fall for the illusion’s goodness trick again.

Getting Through the Tunnel of Lack to Find Real Abundance

Light at the end of the tunnel

By Cathy Eck

 

We all realize that abundance is true.  Even televangelists talk of our right to abundance these days.  Yet often the path to freedom takes us through periods of lack.  We wonder what we’re doing wrong.  We’re actually doing something right.

Once we U-turn and accept the path of initiation, the seeming problems in our life are there to push us to let go.  To get to abundance, we must let go of the normal perspective of rich and poor (triangle process).  We’re taught that rich people are free.  Money buys happiness.  Not true!

Abundance isn’t the same as wealth or riches.  Abundance has no opposite.  It’s the normal state of having everything that we want and desire.  But abundance doesn’t include excess.  It doesn’t include saving for a rainy day because the True Self doesn’t have rainy days.  Abundance is simple.

 

Fixing Causes

Initiation is about fixing causes, not effects. To understand this, watch an episode of, “Keeping Up With the Kardashians.” If they argue, they fix the relationship with gifts. Wreck their car, a new one is in the driveway before the sun sets. Need to lose weight, they hire a personal trainer, chef, and therapist. When we fix problems with money and experts, we’re living from wealth, not abundance.  We think the money buys freedom; but the rich are usually the furthest from true freedom.  The more we fix our problems with money, the more we veil our causal beliefs.  Lack pushes us to let go.

When we fix a problem’s effect, the problem still exists as a potential in our mind.  Often we project that problem on to others because our mind says it no longer applies to us.  We fixed it.  It’s hard for me to convince people to let go of problems that they believe they’ve fixed because the remedies of the illusion have gotten so quick and so good.  People say to me, “Shit Cathy I already fixed this with medication, surgery, or positive thinking.”  “I just want to keep taking the drugs, doing the exercises, or going to the healer.”  If we fear the problem coming back, or have to take or do something to manage it, we haven’t removed the cause.  The false self will do anything to avoid exposure; it doesn’t believe in letting go because it wants to stay alive and in control of our body and life.

If we let go of the cause of any problem, we’ll  never experience it again; we’ll be able to help others let it go until eventually that problem doesn’t exist for anyone anymore.  That’s true service of the highest level.

Our True Self, once we allow it back into our life, knows that our beliefs must be exposed and battled for us to live a free life. We won’t have incentive to let go of causal beliefs if we fix our problems with money.  So lack enters our life to keep us from being tempted.

We’re often overwhelmed with fear and powerlessness when lack enters our reality.  That’s good.  If we follow our emotions with our attention, we’ll find the causal beliefs.  Then we just have to remember to let go.  Our mind might tells us that we need help from others. It will fear that we’ll be homeless.  It embarrasses us.  We might fear that we’re being punished by God.  Thoughts of unfairness or injustice often arise. We might blame others for our situation. These thoughts are all false, but they look and feel true because we’re psychologically reversed on the subject of money — we think the emotion we feel is proving our beliefs true when it’s actually reminding us that our beliefs are false.

If we battle our mind and defeat those psychological reversals, the lack will disappear. But this time we’ve fixed the cause not the effect.  We won’t experience lack again.  We won’t even fear it coming back.  That’s abundance.

 

Losing Motivation

Initiates lose their external motivation. We used to be able to drag our asses out of bed every day to work for the man. Now, we can’t.  We can’t find the willpower to obey the rules of society — work hard, suffer with a smile, and pay your debts.  We often feel worthless or start to wonder who we really are because our mind tries to figure out why we’re in this situation.  Most people lose their outer motivation before their inner motivation kicks in.

Quitting the job we detest gives us the time to sit quietly and let go.  Ideally, we let go until action is inspired.  Freedom, not wealth, has become our new north star.  But often we go through a long dark tunnel of lack before we see the light of abundance.  Our mind makes letting go difficult as it reminds us of our dangerous reality.  We must remember that our reality is the effect of our beliefs — not the truth.  We have to keep letting go if we want to get through that tunnel.

 

Losing Approval

Often our old way of making a living earned us approval or avoided disapproval.  We may have felt virtuous for working hard. We might have improved lives in an illusory service role based on fixing effects.  Now we feel lazy, worthless, and selfish.  The false self is working overtime to win back control.

Our friends and family will usually offer false-self support.  Misery does love company in the illusion.  It might appear that the world doesn’t want our gifts or talents.  This phase can feel incredibly lonely.

 

When we step on the path to freedom, we meet all the beliefs we accepted in the past.  The road to hell is paved with beliefs — lack is a hot topic for the false self.  But we don’t get to return to heaven on earth without retracing all of our false steps.  We must refrain from trying to detour.  We keep letting go; and one day, our mind is free.  Abundance is the only possible reality.

When Letting Go Doesn’t Appear to Work

When Letting Go Doesn't appear to work

By Cathy Eck

 

Often, people fear that letting go isn’t working because they’re not getting physical results.  Letting go is all about creating a mental shift.  Physical changes are a bi-product of letting go, not the purpose of it.  Always keep score based on your mental state.  Does your mind feel more clear?  Are you more at peace?  Do you recognize that your emotions are helping you discriminate?

Related to this issue are questions like these.  “How does one know if they’ve let go?”  “How does letting go happen?”  “Help me, Cathy, I don’t know what to let go.”

 

Letting Go Always Works

If we have no beliefs, we can’t create a false experience.  Our problems, pain, and emotions remind us to let go; but they don’t often tell us what to let go.  Let me give you an example.

Someone has a disease that a medical doctor has labeled “incurable.”  They believe doctors cure disease.  They also have a belief that diseases are true and given to us by God as lessons or punishment.  Their mother thinks they’re bad because they’re gay.  They believe their mother is their authority.   So they think their disease is punishment for being gay.  This represents a complex of beliefs.  Their disease won’t leave until they let go of most of this complex.  If they hold on to any of these false beliefs, that belief can provide the platform for their disease to continue to thrive.

If we discriminate, we’ll feel emotion when we think any of the above statements.  Complexes can be very tricky.  Lots of subtext will arise as we let go of beliefs that we’ve considered true in the past.  We might hear voices that try to get us to feel guilt or shame for letting such things go.  We might fear loneliness if we make ourselves too different.  The voices might say that letting go isn’t working; it will try to get us to fix the effect of the problem or look for a rescuer.  It isn’t just the directly-obvious beliefs that cause our problems.  Consequently, I push people who want their life to change to let go of everything.

You can’t screw this up.  You can’t let go of the truth.

 

Did I Really Let Go?

If we really let go, we won’t think the belief again.  More important, we won’t be looking for an answer to our problem or someone to save us from it.  We also won’t be trying to keep the problem away with prayers, lucky incantations, or superstitions.  It can take a lot of work to get to the free perspective.  But when we completely let something go, we don’t have to do it ever again.

We’ll forget we ever had the problem.  It feels like we dreamed it.

You can’t fake letting go.  You either did it or you didn’t.  Lots of teachers, gurus, politicians, and speakers appear to be very spiritual, unemotional, and free; but we only see them in the masculine role.  They’re always on stage or in the pulpit.  We look up to these people, which lifts them up to false heights.  Then we live in their shadow, and their shadow isn’t pretty.  We think there’s something wrong with us.

If one is playing a masculine role, they’re free of a belief when they no longer see it in themselves or those who are feminine to them.  If they’re a preacher who sees sinners, the sinner is still suppressed in them.  If they’re a teacher who has stupid or bad students, the judgment of stupidity or disobedience is within their mind.  The challenge of the masculine role is to never give beliefs to others or project beliefs on them.

However, if we’re playing a feminine role, we’ve submitted our creative authority to others who appear superior to us.  We must be careful that we don’t blindly believe these authorities.  In the feminine role, we’re constantly challenged by others who think they know what’s true for us.  The challenge of the feminine role is to feel, discriminate, and never blindly make another’s words our truth.

 

Roles Are Key

As you can see, roles are played in reverse in the illusion.  Those in masculine roles believe it’s their duty to tell others what to believe.  Parents, teachers, doctors, politicians, and clergy all tell others what to believe.  They think we don’t know the truth; we have to learn it.  Likewise, we’re taught to blindly believe authority, even when what they say feels bad.  We’re forced to respect people who don’t deserve respect.

These two psychological reversals are at the core of the whole illusion deception.  That deception causes all the suffering, poverty, pain, and disease on this planet.  None of it would exist if people did three things:

1) Didn’t believe anything another said that felt bad (feminine role).  They trusted their emotions over authority.

2) Never imposed or projected a belief on another (masculine role).

3)  Let go of all second-cause beliefs that they’ve accepted from others in the past.  Second cause beliefs contain judgment — good/evil, right/wrong, superior/inferior, etc.

That’s it.  Number three takes time.  Sadly, it isn’t done in a weekend workshop.  But we all have the ability to do it.  To let go of the illusion is the greatest service we can provide the planet and others.  It doesn’t even cost a thing.

It’s painful to see how many beliefs we’ve accepted.  Exiting the illusion is like finding our way out of a labyrinth; we must let go of what doesn’t work so we can find what does.  If we’re still clinging to our past practices and techniques that haven’t worked, we won’t find the exit.

Letting go, unlike other practices, has an end.  Letting beliefs go reveals our True Self.  If the process appears slow or ineffective, it’s because the false self still has too much power.  Be persistent; let go of whatever you can.  In time, you’ll be rewarded with the revelation of your True Self — pure freedom.

 

The False Self as a Container and Level Confusion

beliefs separate

By Cathy Eck

 

We Are One

One of the most dangerous beliefs to come out of the New Age Movement is, “We are One.”  It’s hard to understand why this statement is dangerous because it’s true.  However, it’s only true at the True Self level.  When we put True Self thinking on top of false self beliefs, we create serious level confusion.  Our false self usually projects an opponent that we abhor, and we can’t escape them because our false mind thinks we’re one with them.

The last thing we want is oneness with other false selves.  If our false self believes in oneness, it will also become one with other people’s confusion, pain, or suffering; or it will take responsibility for things that we didn’t create.

Once we understand that our false selves weren’t designed to be one with other false selves, the process of letting go gets much easier and faster.  The false self is like a creative container.  In order to create anything, we do need some beliefs.  We hold the beliefs we need in our false self container while we create or co-create; then when we’re done with that creative act, we erase the container and start over.  This was called remaining a mental virgin in the ancient world.

Beliefs were never meant to be permanent.  The True Self holds that which is permanent or immortal; it can’t be erased.  Therefore, letting go of the belief in oneness is totally safe; and it can be life changing.

 

Mind As Computer

The computer is a near perfect analogy for our minds.  When we buy a computer, it comes with an operating system.  Everyone gets an  operating system.  You could say that computers are the same at birth.  But the operating system doesn’t do much; it only provides creative potential.  Likewise, our True Self is our mind’s operating system.  It provides the potential, but we need beliefs or programs to create.

Once we take over creative responsibility for our computer, we load programs, many of which we share with other users.  These popular programs could be likened to cultural or religious beliefs.  If we enjoy a particular program, we’ll want to study it or talk about it with others.  We might take classes in that program or join a user’s group.  We might not want to ever delete that program, but we can.  And, most important, we don’t have the right to sneak into another person’s office and install our program on their computer.  We must honor the privacy of  others and leave their hard drive alone.  Our passion is meant to fuel our own creativity — not to become an evangelist for our programs.

After loading programs, we add data, sound, and images that are uniquely our own.  In a short period of time, we won’t find another computer exactly like ours in all the world.  We can’t let go of the operating system or True Self because that would destroy our creative capacity.  But we have complete control over our hard drive (our false self).  We can add or delete programs and data as necessary depending on what we want to create and who we want to co-create with.

 

Back to The Mind

The data or programs we load into our false mind create uniqueness.  If we chose our programs carefully for creative purposes, we’ll love the focus and potential that our false mind provides.  We won’t feel separate from others because our True Self has oneness handled.  In addition, we’ll easily erase the beliefs when our creative focus changes.

But if we didn’t choose our programs, we’ll lack creative uniqueness.  We’ll only be able to copy others.  We’ll find it difficult or impossible to erase our hard drive.   We’ll fear that erasing the shared programs or data will produce loneliness (when the exact opposite is true).  Our perfect creative tool has now become a high security prison where the prisoners make sure that no one escapes.

If we’ve had controlling people in our life who thought they owned our hard drive, we’ll fear the programs (beliefs) of others.  We’ll fear that everyone wants to take over our hard drive.  When we fear that another can do such a thing, they do.  This is a huge problem in the world today.  Everyone is afraid of everyone else’s beliefs.  They keep trying to strengthen their firewall (boundaries) with more beliefs and programs.  They don’t realize that in order to fear another’s belief system, they have to hold it in mind.  If we let their beliefs go from our mind, we lose our fear of them.  Our immortal True Self provides far better protection than even the best program.

 

False Self Example

If my friend and I share a belief in hard work, and I delete my belief, her mental container remains unaffected.  I can’t delete beliefs from her mind.  But now I’m leading an easy life while she’s still working herself to death.  She could let go of her belief and join me, but she’s proud of her hard work ethic.  She gets approval for her martyrdom.  From her veiled perspective, I might look lazy or like I’m cheating at life.  I’m now her enemy.

The false self bonds or creates the illusion of oneness using beliefs.  It looks for like-minded people for comfort and security.  It wants other prisoners around it to validate its false rightness.  It feels lonely without like-minded support.

After letting go, we’re often tempted to turn back because those we care about believe we’ve abandoned, rejected or hurt them.  But we must keep letting go until we clear our mind completely and rediscover the place where WE REALLY ARE ALL ONE  — the place of no borders.  We didn’t abandon or reject them; they’re creating their own painful separation by holding on.  Once our own mind is free and our judgment gone, we can hold out our hand.  And often they reach up, grab on, and let go.  Now, WE ARE ONE.

 

Why Reading About the Truth Doesn’t Get You To Freedom

Finding the truth by reading with discrimination

By Cathy Eck

 

Stuffed Full of Knowledge

From the time we’re born, we’re trained to learn from others — to stuff knowledge and information in to our mind.  So it seems logical that learning or reading about truth or freedom would cause us to find freedom.  But when we stuff more knowledge into our already crowded minds, we get a memorized version of the truth.  Reading about how to get free doesn’t make us free.  Talking about freedom doesn’t get us there.  Taking purposeful actions or rituals that demonstrate our knowledge of freedom doesn’t free us.

That’s why Jesus said to pray in private.  Initiation is a private thing that we all essentially do alone.  If we don’t find freedom through the mind by discriminating and letting go of our false beliefs, we’ll just believe the illusion again and again.

Telling you that reading doesn’t do the job when I’m a writer isn’t good for business.  But it happens to be the truth.  I write to make the journey to freedom faster, easier, and less lonely; I want to prompt you to let go.  Ultimately, I want to lose you as a reader or client because you’ve arrived.

The process of letting go perfects our discrimination so we can’t ever fall again.  The knowing and freedom that come from the process of letting go is pure.  We get our own insights.  We find our own unique perspective of truth.  Once we find freedom in this way, we won’t ever lose it.  Thus, free ones were considered immortal because death to the initiate was believing the illusion.

 

Freedom 

Ideally, we’d hear the truth, wake up to freedom, and live happily after.  However, our false minds have controlled our life and our bodies for a long time.  Our false self is a worthy opponent.  And, let me tell you, false selves love when we layer truth on top of it’s bullshit because it knows we won’t be letting go anytime soon.  Our mask will be shining too brightly.  When we layer truth on top of falsehood, we project the falsehood on to others so that we have a strong air of superiority and confidence.  We’re positive and their negative; we’re good and their bad.  We’re right and their wrong.

One must remember that the term con man came from the notion of the confidence man.  He looks like a True Self, speaks like a True Self, acts like a True Self, but he isn’t a True Self.  All of our problems in the world come from our inability to discriminate between the con man or woman and the True Self; this is especially true when we read.  We’re trained as young children to believe what we read, to hold on to it by memorizing it, and to be able to spit it back on command.  We’re trained to become con artists ourselves as we come to think our knowledge and expertise is who we really are.  Once we recognize this, we start to see through the trap of reading and learning.

Since we’ve been trained to believe we can’t let go, new information we read or learn goes on top of old information.   The old beliefs go into a mental storage vault that psychologists label the unconscious.  If we don’t like the info in our vault, we’ll often see it in others as projection.  We’ll think our job is to fix them.  But our real job is to empty our own vault.

In truth, there’s NO such thing as an unconscious mind.  We see the world that we hold within our mind.  If we’re bothered by something we see, hear, or read, our emotions remind us to let go.  Our emotions let us know that we’re contributing to the problem that we see in another or in the world with our beliefs.  When we let go, we either won’t notice the problem anymore or we’ll comfortably expose it and drain it of its power.  We won’t be inclined to fix it or treat it as real or true.

 

Reading and Learning

For a long time, reading was my escape.  I felt good when I read things that validated how I wanted the world to be.  But at some point, I realized that the reading wasn’t changing me at the core.  It was changing my facade.  It changed my conscious mind but didn’t clear out my unconscious.   I had to find out how to let go of my false mind, my unconscious.  That was the answer for me because I didn’t just want the truth, I wanted to eliminate my inner falsehood.  I wanted freedom.

People often ask me for recommended books to read, and I rarely answer their question.  Reading on the path to freedom isn’t about learning or putting more facts or truth in our mind.  It’s about provoking us to let go.  It’s about exposing beliefs that hold us away from freedom.  I can’t say what book will do that for you; but you’re True Self knows.

Treat reading as anything else.  Trust your inner initiator and read what you’re inspired to read.  But always read with your body, not your intellect.  Feel as you read so that you can notice when memories, beliefs, or emotions arise.  When they do, stop and follow them to the cause.  Let go of whatever arises in your mind.  In this way, reading helps expose our beliefs.  Reading decreases the size of our false mind.  Reading provokes letting go.

If you find yourself feeling validated or inspired by what you’re reading, ask yourself what belief was validated.  If you find yourself sad, angry, or depressed, look for the causal belief.  Once people start reading this way, they all say the same thing.  “All that stuff I used to think was so amazing and inspiring, now looks empty.”  Likewise, they’ll often find insights and truth in strange places.  They’ve stopped hoarding beliefs and knowledge and have begun to find their own true wisdom.

 

 

 

The Art of Being Ordinary

Ordinary or Extraordinary?

By Cathy Eck

SCORPIO: What if you had the power to enchant and even bewitch people with your charisma? Would you wield your allure without mercy? Would you feel wicked delight in their attraction to you,even if you didn’t plan to give them what they want? I suspect these questions aren’t entirely rhetorical right now. You may have more mojo at your disposal than you realize. Speaking for your conscience, I will ask you not to desecrate your privilege. If you must manipulate people, do it for their benefit as well as yours. Use your raw magic responsibly. Halloween costume suggestion: a mesmerizing guru; an irresistible diva; a stage magician.  (Rob Brezsny’s Free Will Astrology:  http://FreeWillAstrology.com)

 

Astrology

Each year, in celebration of my Scorpio birthday, I save a copy of Rob Brezsny’s Free Will Astrology column.  I’m not fond of traditional astrology.  What spews from the mouth of most astrologers is a great description of our prison cell within the illusion disguised as the truth.  Many astrologers use their masculine position to keep people in their cells fearing retrograde planets and scary transits if they escape.

Our natural desire to be good provides incentive to will our way to the positive side of each sign, planet, and house while avoiding, and therefore projecting, the shadow side on to the world.  Rob presents both sides of the illusion and cracks open the gate to allow us to see our way out.  He’s an initiate at heart; it comes through in his unusual view of astrology.

My birthday horoscope brought me back to a time when I was faced with a difficult life choice.  During my business years, I had quite the reputation.  I was an expert — a valued authority.  People treated me with respect and admiration.  It was actually hard not to think highly of myself.  Nearly everyday, I received glowing compliments from people in high places.  I could pick up the phone and make things happen.

One day, while sitting in my office, I looked at a sign pasted on my computer.  “Be anything; just don’t be ordinary.”  It was one of those quotes you pick up from inspirational speakers and hear when you attend pump-you-up business conventions.  I’d read that quote a million times, but this time I had a moment of sanity.  I thought “What’s wrong with being ordinary?  Why do I fear it so?”  I realized that ordinary was like a demon that stood behind me constantly trying to pull me down.  Saying my magic affirmation was what kept that demon behind me.

 

The Choice

During my time in business, I came to know the ins and outs of the illusion.  I knew that with force of will, I could reign like a king over others.  I could win at the illusion game.  But I realized that little demon would always be there looking for an opening.

What if this strange pull to ordinary wasn’t really a demon?  Forcing my will never brought me the peace or freedom I truly desired.  Oh, I’d leave trails of losers along the way — the Scorpio in me thought that was a divine idea.  But I didn’t want to live from win-lose anymore.

I decided that I would choose ordinary and strip the power from this seeming demon. I’d no longer avoid ordinary; I’d dive in.  At first, I changed my business approach to win-win.  Eventually, I sold my business and dropped all my prestigious labels.  It was then that I came to realize why ordinary isn’t a happy state.

Ordinary (in the illusion) means assuming a feminine role to win-lose powermongers who need losers to win.  Ordinary means suppressing our God-given value and talents so that others can live an inflated life where their talents or knowledge are perceived as extraordinary.  In the illusion, ordinary people are valued for their ability to obediently worship the elite and to suffer with a smile.

 

Truth

In truth, being ordinary means being our True Self — as we’re designed.  The illusory extraordinary is actually a charismatic mask of power that keeps unconscious people spellbound in false beliefs.  While that mask appears to be more powerful than our True Self, it isn’t.

The notions of better or worse, superior or inferior, or extraordinary and ordinary aren’t real.  Only in the illusion are some talents valued more than others, are experts with knowledge considered greater than non-experts with wisdom, and are those with pedigrees naturally extraordinary.

After I made the tough decision to no longer use my ability to play an OSCAR-worthy guru, wizard, or magician, I felt a great loss.  I missed the accolades and the money.  I missed having people listen to me and trust me.

When I wielded my allure, bewitched people with my charm, and gave them knowledge which served the illusion, they adored me.  Now that I dropped the facade, spoke the truth, and wanted only win-win experiences, those same people found me odd, wrong, and even evil at times.

The illusion also made me outer directed.  The art of being ordinary demanded inner direction.  I had to let go of all the rewards of the illusion, including my false power and value.  That’s why Jesus said the rich won’t get to heaven.  Heaven is freedom, our True Self; but when we’re winning in the illusion, it’s hard to leave.

As Rob suggests, if I must manipulate, I should do it for the other’s benefit.  I do use what looks like Scorpio power to convince people to let go, to be themselves, and to choose love over judgment or hate.  I use it to push the seeming extraordinary off their pedestals and to provide some wings for the seeming ordinary until they can fly on their own.  I could still dip into the illusion and produce some raw magic, mojo, or charisma at will; but why would I when being ordinary means being my True nature, and being my True Self means being free.

Illusion Confusion: Eliminating Judgment

Judgment and Illusion Confusion

By Cathy Eck

 

Judgment

Last week, I wrote about my sadness that people are often considered to be badly created or badly raised.  As I mentioned, I don’t think it’s that uncommon for people to think of others in that way.  However, in America, we wouldn’t dare say what we’re thinking.  We’d cover it up with a nice mask.  Americans are excellent, silent projectors of judgment.  This is an update on those earlier stories and a testimony to how things can change when you let go.

I’d often felt others judge me as badly created or badly raised only because I was different.  I didn’t share their beliefs or see through the same lens.  So I went back to many of those times, brought up the emotions that I repressed because I didn’t know how to let go at the time, and witnessed the emotions realizing that the person’s judgment (belief) wasn’t the truth.  They weren’t really judging me; they were judging their own projection.  But when I didn’t know that, I stored the painful memory in my body.  I did that process until I couldn’t think of anymore examples.  I just felt peace and love.  Then I completely forgot about it.  Until a few days later…

 

Illusion Confusion

I went to a festival in the center city here in Cuenca (above photo).  Lots of people were dancing in the streets to very good live music.  A man came up to me and held out his hand.  He was an older Ecuadorian man — dirty and very drunk.  At first I thought he wanted money, but his hand was turned with the palm down.  I knew enough Spanish to realize he wasn’t talking about money.  He wanted to dance.  I politely said “No,” but he wouldn’t leave me alone.  I realized that I didn’t say “No” with enough force.  American politeness is often too soft here.  So I said, “No, gracias!” (No, thank you) in a slightly louder voice; but still he tried to convince me to dance with him.

Just then a young man, who was leaning on a nearby fence, walked over and very gently held the man by the elbow and explained to him kindly that I didn’t want to dance.  He walked him away from me and then went back to his place on the fence.  There was no force, no anger — just caring and kindness.  My mind flashed to earlier images in my life of bouncers beating up drunk men or policemen pushing and yelling at people as they demonstrated their authority.

I realized that the young man didn’t see the old drunk man as badly created or badly raised; he saw him as confused.  That was how he spoke to him — like he was teaching him rather than punishing him.  He saw him as not knowing the proper way to relate to someone outside of his own culture.  I walked over to the young man and said, “Muchas gracias,” (Thank you very much) and smiled.  He smiled back and nodded.

 

No Judgment, No Force

I still can’t think about that interaction without getting tears in my eyes.  I realized that the reason we use authority and force to handle things is because of judgment.  Authorities see themselves as right and superior; the offender is obviously wrong and inferior.  When judgment isn’t present, no force is needed.  It’s all so simple.

Judgment will always be present, even if unstated, if we believe that other humans can be badly raised or badly created.  Thus, if we believe in the notion of original sin or believe that humans fell from grace, then we can’t help but have judgment for others.

I realized how lucky I was not to have those beliefs installed in my mind as a child.  Before I married, I didn’t know what judgment was.  It was a word that I couldn’t comprehend.   Occasionally, I attended Catholic church with my husband and his family.  I realized that my mind started to judge others at that time.  I didn’t like it, and I wondered where the thoughts were coming from.  I felt it was from the church because I noticed that people seemed very judgmental after they attended mass.  But I kept dismissing my observation because it seemed ridiculous that our mind would become more confused, negative, and hateful after attending what was supposed to be something good and spiritual.

Religions all evolved from the idea that humans are flawed and need spiritual training.  The notion of initiation, on the other hand, is based on the idea that we are good and spiritual by nature.  That goodness can’t be destroyed; it can only be covered with beliefs, creating confusion.  Even the worst human isn’t evil in the initiate’s eyes; they just have a thicker layer of illusion covering their True Self.

This isn’t only a lesson in how to treat others.  It’s a lesson in how to treat ourselves.  If we view ourselves as flawed and needing fixing, we’ll hold on to beliefs in problems, suffering, and punishment.  We’ll try to use our will to jump over limiting beliefs.  On the other hand, if we see ourselves as good and deserving of love, we’ll use our will to eliminate our beliefs.

 

Letting Go

I often have days where I want to give up trying to resurrect the old initiation teachings.  I’ll think that I can’t take one more person telling me that viewing humans as innately good and loving is ridiculous.  I can’t hear one more person describe humans as physical meat suits that are evolving nicely.

But then I witness the natural power of the initiate’s point of view in action, just as I did with that young man.  I see my own worldview change as I let go, and I know I can’t go back to looking at others as badly created or badly raised.  I can’t go back to thinking that people need fixing.  It’s just so much easier to let go and love.

 

Eliminating Roles — A Shortcut to Freedom

Masks we wear

By Cathy Eck

 

We’re All Actors

One of my greatest ah-ha moments came while listening to an interview of Forest Whitaker after his incredible performance in the “Last King of Scotland.”   Forest played the brutal Ugandan dictator, Idi Amin; and he really owned the character.  My insight came when he said that it took him three months to shed that role and get back to being himself.

Wait a minute, three months?  It took him only three months to shed Idi Amin and get back to himself?  Idi Amin had enough baggage to keep a million people busy letting go for years.

Why do people believe that letting go takes forever?  Shit, people in the east think it takes lifetimes.  They sit in the forest or a cave for decades, and they still don’t come out themselves.  If Whitaker can let go of Idi Amin in only three months, why can’t I let my roles go in three days?  After all, I’m clearly no Idi Amin.

The answer was very clear.  Forest Whitaker knows that he isn’t Idi Amin.  You and I, however, often believe that we’re the roles we play.  We often can’t tell if a belief that we carry in mind is true or false until we let it go.

Often we don’t know that a belief lives in our unconscious until a person or event exposes it.  Most people can’t tell the difference between their pleasant mask and their True Self so they don’t let go.  But we can’t let go of our True Self — letting go never causes a problem.  Freedom requires letting go of our entire false self — to return to a blank slate so we can write and direct the life script that we desire.

 

Roles that Bind Us

We’ve all believed and accepted many roles throughout life.  Roles can be fun if they’re temporary; ask any actor.  But when a role becomes permanent, it can be hell.  Roles can define us and keep us stuck.  We live as if we have a prominently displayed sign on our chest exposing our label.  People sense that label and treat us accordingly.

In addition, we’ve been trained to believe that we can’t let go of a role that another assigned to us, especially if that person was an authority.  It feels like they need to free us.

Relationships make stepping out of roles difficult because people think we’re insane when we let go of a belief that they still believe to be true.  Their reality proves them right, and people in the illusion confuse reality with truth.  They don’t realize that we’re not excluding them; and they can still believe whatever they want about their life.  No one has the right to tell another what to believe.  But relationships often form around common beliefs.  People think that we’re letting them go when we’re just letting go of a belief.

Some people expect us to show up in our mask; and if their expectation is very strong or if we are a people pleaser, it reinforces our role.

Letting go of a physical or mental diagnosis can be nearly impossible if the people in our life believe our label and treat us as having that label.  Healing is often much easier when you simply remove yourself from those who label you.

 

Living Without Roles

Imagine if you knew you were acting?  After all, you are.  If you’re being yourself, you wouldn’t play a permanent role, especially one you didn’t like.  You’d play a role and drop it when you had enough.  You’d drop it easily because you’d know you weren’t the role.

Dropping roles means dropping lots of beliefs at one time.  When we accept a label or role, we accept all the beliefs that are part of that acting engagement.   A great actor will study the character and adopt his or her state of mind.  Once the state of mind is accepted, the part flows naturally.  They appear to become the character by wearing the character’s mask.  But they drop the mask when it isn’t useful any longer.  If we’re resisting dropping our mask, it’s wise to see if it has a payoff.  If we let go of the payoff, the mask should come off more easily.

When we drop any label or role, we create a massive amount of space for our True Self to fill.  Ideally, we’d just be our Self and everything would be perfect.  But our world is in transition.  If we’re uncomfortable dropping the entire role, then we can just drop some of the beliefs that make up that role.  We can show up at mom’s, play the daughter or son role she assigns while witnessing our act and maintaining our sense of Self; then we can drop the beliefs that bothered us most.  Each time we visit, we can let go of the beliefs that arise and incorporate a little more of our True Self.  We can also let go of any belief in our mind that she can’t handle the shift and then let the cards fall where they may.

I used to feel guilty dropping roles, as if they were some sort of contract that I agreed to for life.  But they aren’t contracts; we do everyone a favor when we just be ourselves (although it might take them some time to realize that).

Too many people keep playing old outdated roles because they don’t have another way to be with people they love.  They don’t want to lose the person so they accept the role and resent every minute of it.  Conscious role playing is a temporary bridge to a new way of relating.

Letting go of labels and roles is the fast track to freedom.  It takes courage to drop roles completely.  And, as you can see by the example of Forest Whitaker, it takes knowing clearly who you are not and being willing to let that character go.

Letting Go of Masculine and Feminine Roles

Apple of Tree of Life or Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil

By Cathy Eck

 

Understanding masculine and feminine roles is key to stripping the illusion from our mind.  Masculine and feminine roles were created through stories that were presented as right or true.  The stories caused our minds to accept the masculine role as authority, deserving of obedience and respect.  Once that was accomplished, the masculine roles in the world could abuse their power.  They still do.

When we don’t understand roles, we can’t and don’t discriminate between true and false.  We also tend to either project on others or absorb or reflect the projection of our authority figures.  Let’s look more closely at roles.

 

Inner Roles Defined

Our inner mind has a masculine and a feminine aspect.  When we’re thinking from our True Self, those two mental aspects work together seemlessly.  This was called the alchemical marriage.

When we’re thinking from our True Self, we think only productive thoughts.  We hear creative ideas and truthful thoughts that are calm and harmless to ourselves and others.  We get ideas that cause the world to evolve.  We move nicely along our True path. The effects of our thoughts are always good and win-win in nature.

 

False Mind

Our false mind was created by others who wanted us to think their way.  They wanted to become our false God.  Our minds weren’t designed to hold false beliefs.  In fact, we’re all given a powerful lie detector — emotions.  When we feel emotions, it’s because our OWN mind is thinking false thoughts.  That occurs because:  we’re holding false beliefs in mind and aren’t discriminating; or our authorities are projecting their beliefs on us, and we believe them.

The false self is born whenever we accept our first false thought (belief); the roles in our mind change.  In the false self, the masculine intellect is the inner and outer authority; the emotions become something to eliminate because emotions expose the false self.

In most religious stories and myths, masculine had all the power.  God was male.  That elevated the intellect.  Now an intellect offers a belief, and we do feel emotion at first.  But we can’t do a damn thing about it.  The intellect has authority.  So we accept their thought into our own mind as true.  We just ate the apple from the tree of knowledge of good and evil.  If we do this enough, we’ll start to feel emotion when the True Self speaks and calmness when we hear our beliefs.  We’ve been psychologically reversed.

Someone says to us, “You’re an ass.”  If they’re not our authority, we’ll say, “No, I’m not.”  We’ll let their comment go.  However, if an authority says it, we’ll accept their thought into our mind and hold on to it.  We’ll feel helpless to let it go because we been trained to believe that we can’t change the minds of authority.  Clever huh!

The social norm of respecting elders keeps us from discriminating.  Obedience to authority causes us to ignore emotional signals.  Putting knowledge ahead of our emotions prevents us from questioning the doctor, teacher, parent, or clergy.

 

Outer Roles Defined

Outer roles aren’t about bodies or sex.  A woman can play a masculine role.  A man also plays many feminine roles.

I’ve explained before that the clergy, policemen, parent, doctor, and teachers are all examples of masculine roles.  The masculine role has authority or is the one that’s asserting or giving.  The feminine role receives.

Roles aren’t inherently bad.  If I give you a gift, I’m playing the masculine role.  You’re in the feminine role.  If I serve you a meal, I’m in the masculine role as giver.  Those are pure transactions.  We call them first-cause ideas.  They don’t trap us in the illusion.

Second-cause thinking, however, contains judgment defined by “the man” (although people can be savvy about saying that God spoke to them).  Second-cause thinking creates inequality through position, pedigree, race, culture, religion, or sex; it traps us in the illusion.

Good and evil are critical to the illusion; we aren’t whole if our mind believes in good and evil because we can’t be both at the same time.  We can’t win and lose at the same time.  We live life like we’re riding waves — we’re up, then we’re down.  We’re always half of a whole.  That’s not balanced  — it’s a disaster.

 

Escaping Roles

To escape the illusion, we must recognize and understand roles.  If a person plays an authority role, or a more powerful role within the illusion, they must honor the role responsibly.  The husband can’t blame the wife or kids in a traditional marriage.  The teacher can’t blame students.  They’re the authority.  If we play the role of authority, we must accept responsibility.  We get the credit and the blame.

Likewise, if we’re playing a feminine role, we must learn not to blindly accept beliefs or labels from authority.  We must listen to our emotional lie detector.

If we’re with a friend on equal footing, the masculine and feminine roles gently switch back and forth.  The person speaking is masculine; the listener is feminine.  There’s no competition or desire for power.  The notion of authority must go for us to return to the Garden of Eden.  That won’t happen until enough of us have individually eliminated our beliefs about obedience to authority, second-cause thinking, and judgment from our mind.  Normal thinking must return to purely True and False.

To get out of the illusion, we do the opposite.  When we fell, we believed authority without question.  We took in beliefs as if they were true.  Now we look at the beliefs of those authorities from our past and see if their words had an emotional component.   We let go of the beliefs regardless of who gave them to us.

If your mind isn’t too psychologically reversed, you can make the correction on our own.  If not, get someone to help you discriminate.

Eventually, we learn to be in the illusion but not impacted by it.  Authority loses it’s false power.  We’re free.