Luce: The Movie (and Clones)

The Luce Official Trailer

The movie “Luce” recently came out in theaters.  I saw it months ago at a San Diego film festival event.  I wrote this article right after I saw it, but never published it.  I do have some spoilers throughout the article.  If you want to be surprised, see the movie before you read it. On the other hand, my review will give you a different perspective regarding the characters’ minds; so if you read the article first, you’ll probably see things that you’d have otherwise overlooked.

As I edited this article, I realized that this movie was a great review of the illusion, letting go, clone characters, and initiation…all the things that I write about. The movie is based on the biggest roadblock that we have on the path to freedom. Who is telling the truth, and who is lying? The last line of the trailer sums up the whole movie. “We never really know what’s going on with people.” That’s how it is for most people. But I show you that you can know what’s going on for anyone once you understand the way the human mind was designed and the way it was reprogrammed. Then you’re able to have true compassion for anyone.

Luce” was a film festival favorite at the Sundance and the Tribeca film festivals.  The advertisement for the film festival event that I attended said that the film was about the stories that we tell ourselves and the beliefs that we need to let go.  I thought, “Wow, this film has my name on it.

In addition, the screenwriter, J.C. Lee, was holding a Q&A session after the film.  I love getting the perspective of screenwriters. I love hearing about their writing process and learning where they got their ideas. Lee was introduced as the most innovative and up-and-coming screenwriter today. Clearly my expectations for this film event were very high.

Here’s the plot.  A black child from Africa named Luce was trained to kill as a child terrorist. Luce was adopted by a wealthy, white American couple (the Edgars) when he was about seven or eight years old.  He grew up in a home where he had everything he wanted and needed, and he became a very intelligent and successful teenager. The movie was only about Luce’s senior year in high school. 

The film opened with Luce giving a well-crafted speech to his senior class.  Luce was decent looking, a great athlete, popular, and an excellent speaker.  He was also a star on the debate team, so he clearly knew how to win an argument. Lawyers, i.e., people who debate for a living, make really good liars. They can lie without showing any emotion. Debating is about winning an argument not getting to the win-win point of view or finding the truth. So I’m not fond of debating; it doesn’t take us toward freedom. But debating served Luce’s character in the film.

In his speech, Luce talked of loving the American Dream.  He talked of freedom and especially of loving the American holiday, Independence Day.  Luce was considered a school hero because of his amazing transformation from terrorist fighter in Africa to successful American teenager. 

After the speech, Luce introduced his parents to his history teacher, Harriet Wilson, who was a black woman; her character was played by Octavia Spencer. Luce gushed over how much he loved this particular teacher.  His comments were clearly over-the-top.  It was all for show.

On the way home from the speech, Luce admitted to his parents that he actually hated Ms. Wilson; he referred to her as a bitch.  So we learned that Luce had a nice, middle class public persona covering a private false self that was full of anger and rage. That isn’t uncommon. Most people hide what they’re really thinking in public, or so I’m told. As you can probably tell, I say what I’m thinking in public and in private. Luce was interesting mostly because he was so extreme.

The students in the “bitch” teacher’s class were given an assignment to write about an inspiring leader.  Luce wrote about an African philosopher, Frantz Fanon, who believed in the necessity for revolutionary violence.  Fanon was an anti-colonialist and a Marxist. Luce was a child soldier who lived by Fanon’s philosophy before he came to live with the Edgars. So he had a very rough start in life.

Luce was a walking contradiction. On the one hand, he loved Independence Day, the day when we celebrate freedom in America. He was clearly benefitting by American capitalism. He had a very nice life. On the other hand, Luce just wrote about a Marxist who would love to destroy American freedom and turn America into a communist country. So for Luce, physical freedom (constitutional republic) and lack of physical freedom (communism) would be a strong triangle bottom. Bear in mind, that Luce’s perspective of freedom is very different from the triangle top that I write about. In initiation, mental freedom is the top of the triangle.

Physical reality is always the effect of our mind. So initiates didn’t fix effects. They fixed their minds by letting go (not positive thinking or affirmations), and the effects changed. When people are wired backwards, and most people are, they think that their thoughts come from whatever happened. So they remain stuck in the illusion. They’ve blocked the exit ramp.

To make matters worse, Luce’s leader violated my precision of language rule. If you want freedom, you can’t relabel ugly things like terrorism with pretty words. You have to let the ugly things go. Fanon used the term revolutionary combined with the word violence. Of course, that sounds a lot better than terrorist. However, it’s deceptive; violence is never revolutionary; it’s always primitive because it’s always win-lose, not win-win.

Luce’s paper was rooted in his African past, so it was very convincing; he knew his subject matter well.  It was grounded by his early years of life in a warzone. Ms. Wilson felt that Luce idolized Fanon, and Fanon wasn’t a good role model for him.  That was on the surface. However under the surface, Ms. Wilson was picking up the incongruence in Luce.

Incongruence is what we feel around people who are living at the triangle bottom on any subject. They’re always in two minds. It doesn’t mean they’re bad or evil; it just means that they don’t actually believe what they’re saying. They believe something else that would NOT sound good, kind, or socially correct. How can Luce be for freedom and idolize this man at the same time? He has to be in two minds to do that.

We have to step into Ms. Wilson’s shoes to understand her predicament. On the one hand, she’s black. She clearly loves Luce’s rags-to-riches story and wants him to do well. She also doesn’t want to fall prey to any black stereotypes because she’s been down that road herself. On the other hand, she’s holding pretty convincing evidence that Luce could be dangerous to the other students. She has to be responsible as a teacher. It’s odd to be in such a quandary. You wonder if you’re reading too much into the situation; but at the same time, you realize that the old adage, “it’s better to be safe than sorry,” might be the right way to go.

Ms. Wilson felt that Luce could be a potential school bomber.  So she searched his locker and found some illegal fireworks.  For her, that sealed the deal. She met with Luce’s mother, who took the fireworks home and hid them. She didn’t deal with Luce. She was in a quandary too; without letting go, we tend to end up in these rock-and-a-hard-place predicaments.

Now we have another triangle bottom. Luce’s teacher, Ms. Wilson, was on the suspicious, responsible, overly-cautious side. Luce’s mother was making excuses for Luce, and she was in denial. As you know, the two sides of any triangle bottom will play tug of war; and this was clearly demonstrated in the film. We also have a fake top of the triangle with Luce; he was by no means a True Self. But when he turned on the charm, he was definitely pretending to be a True Self. People were easily conned by his act. People are a lot like diamonds. It’s very hard to tell the difference between a real one and a fake one.

Many people today have very well-developed personas like Luce. In fact, their personas are so well-crafted that people do think they’re coming from their True Self. I call such people clone characters. They like to steal the top of the triangle from the True Self. I joke that they like to sit on their clone throne. A persona can never be a True Self; it will always be fake. The True Self comes from deep within a person’s mind. A persona/clone rests on the surface of a person’s mind. Such people won’t ever let us into their world because they have a lot to hide.

We all have such clone characters in our mind, in our life, or both. These characters want us to think that their mind is unified and true, and they want to be seen as good, loving, and kind. But under that perfect persona, they’re no such thing; clones always have long shadows that are very well hidden.

Clones work harder than a True Self to look polished. The persona becomes automatic; and that’s why people think it’s natural. A True Self is not polished; in fact, the True Self often looks more like a rough-cut diamond simply because we compare such a person to the well-polished clone. It’s easy to be confused. We are like moths to the flame…we go for the bright light even if it burns us. So we vote for clones, we go to work for clones, we study with clones, and we even love and marry clones. Then we wonder why our life isn’t making sense anymore, and we can’t seem to remember who we are.

In the Gold Circle, we work on the topic of clones a whole lot. I can only give you a taste here. People in the program are shocked by the clones that they believed in the past; they were sure that they were True Selves. So they put their beliefs into their mind. I show them the cracks. Once you know how the mind works, clones are easier to detect. They often sound good or even true, but they have divided minds. They speak a nice sounding overt message along with a harmful or unwanted covert message. They appear to shine so brightly ONLY because we’re trained to never see their darkness. Sadly, if you believe that a clone character is a True Self, you’ll see any True Self as fake or imaginary (including your own True Self).

For Luce, Frantz Fanon was still stuck in his mind. Luce idolized this man as a child, and that’s largely why he held on to the voice. If people in the film had known how to let go, they would have viewed Luce’s homework paper as a cry for help. But without letting go, it became the awakening of the beast below the beauty.

Near the end of the trailer, Luce said that people either see him as a monster or a saint. He needs to let go of both of those labels; but if he’s like most people, he’s trying to hold on to saint.

We won’t let go of a clone’s beliefs if we think that they’re telling the truth. For example, Christians have a moral clone; and they think that their moral beliefs are the truth. But those morals are just beliefs. Progressives have a politically-correct clone, and they think that saying the politically correct (PC) thing is good and right. Right and wrong, or good and evil, keep us stuck in the illusion. We escape by using true and false.

Luce was a little boy when he was in Africa. Of course, he thought that his leaders were telling him the truth. We all fall into that trap as young children.

Clones hide their shadow because they don’t like it, and they don’t realize that they can let it go. No one tells us that letting go is possible in the illusion. In this way, we’re all victims of the illusion. You can see the confusion and suffering in this film. It’s actually not that uncommon of a situation.

When people, like Ms. Wilson, expose a clone’s beliefs as false, the clone typically becomes very defensive; they hurl insults or labels at the exposer, and they tell bigger and bigger lies to cover their previous lies.  They work very hard to get everyone to believe them and to think that the truth teller is lying.

They think that they can keep their shadow under wraps by fueling their custom-made persona. So they become even more shiny. I call this, putting ice cream on manure. When the ice cream melts, the clone needs to cover the manure with more ice cream. It’s a full-time job that never ends. That’s my definition of hard work.

In psychological terms, experts would label Luce a sociopath; but that ties Luce down. It’s very hard to get free of such a label. That’s why I describe the shadow as the false self. That strips the person of a bad/evil label that could define them for life. Stripping off that label opens the possibility for Luce to exit the illusion. However, for Luce to get free, he would have to let go of his good labels and beliefs. He’d have to lose that shine, and that’s what keeps most people from letting go. The idea of losing their shine terrifies them. They fear judgment, humiliation, banishment, and loneliness. The clone’s goodness (saint) and the false self’s badness (monster) form an inner triangle bottom. We must take out both sides to get free and move to the top of the triangle.

Let’s face it, we all want Luce to become the great guy that he wants to be. But it isn’t win-win for all if he’s incongruent, manipulative, and lies to get what he wants. We all need to mentally earn what we get physically. The one constant law of the initiates was mental cause creates physical effect. That’s congruence, and it’s very rare these days.

After Ms. Wilson saw Luce’s shadow, the dynamic between her and Luce became weird.  It makes sense. It’s like she saw him mentally naked. She can’t unsee what she has seen. Luce felt exposed, and clones hate exposure. They see exposure like a vampire views light.

So Luce turned up the volume on his saintly persona; now he looked uber good.  He was helping others, buying flowers for Ms. Wilson, and apologizing for anything he’d ever done wrong without actually admitting that he did anything wrong.  He was trying to demonstrate that Ms. Wilson was lying. But she was not lying. She was basing everything she said on FACTS.

I’m not going to go through the whole story, but Luce told lie after lie; and like most clones, he was a convincing liar.  The filmmaker did a great job of allowing us to see what was going on in each character’s mind, while simultaneously hiding the obvious from the characters themselves so that they look surprised and bewildered.

Along the way, Luce raped a girl, he blew up Ms. Wilson’s desk with fireworks, and he painted hateful words on Ms. Wilson’s house.  Of course, others got blamed for what he did.

On the surface, it looked like he was reflecting Ms. Wilson; after all he was her student in a physical feminine role. She was a teacher, which is a physical masculine role. But this is why clones are so tricky. Mentally, the roles are the opposite of the physical when strong clone characters are involved in any relationship. This throws us for a loop. Luce had the mental masculine role even though physically he was in a feminine role.

Later on, we will see that Ms. Wilson was actually feeling the projection of Luce’s shadow. That’s why she knew him so well. I understand Ms. Wilson. It’s how I expose clones. Clones always project long shadows. A True Self, or even someone with false beliefs but no fake persona/clone, doesn’t project. Like real life, most of the people in this story didn’t notice the projections because Luce had such a charming personality.  

Luce’s parents kept avoiding the problem. They discussed Luce as they drank several bottles of wine each night.  Eventually, the mother was faced with a difficult choice. She must admit that her child was lying, or she must start lying herself to protect him.  She chose to lie to protect him. Of course she did that; the movie still had a long way to go. If she told the truth, the story would be over. That’s a good life lesson. When you want to end drama, tell the truth…the whole truth.

Now let’s dive into the psychology of Luce. The screenwriter was basing Luce’s character on a very popular, but false, Jesuit belief that we’re all mentally imprinted from birth to about age seven.  The reason they choose the age of seven was partly practical. Most of us are in school by age seven; so we start to use our mind to learn at that age. We start to develop an intellect. That means that we can actually think for ourselves, but we don’t because we’re placed in schools were we learn what others want us to learn.

The other reason for the age of seven is based on occult teachings. The occultists believe that our life is lived in seven-year cycles. Occultists tend to be lunar focused and matriarchal minded; so a seven-day cycle fits almost perfectly into a lunar month. Thus age seven is the end of our first seven-year cycle in the occult way of thinking. It’s all bullshit. Don’t believe it.

What they call the seven-year imprint would be part of our false self in my terminology. The Jesuits believe that you can tone down that seven-year imprint with calming things like meditation, medication, or practices like martial arts or Tai Chi; or you can cover that false self with a nice persona/clone. The Jesuits also believe that this early programming will never go away.  In other words, they want us to BELIEVE that we can’t let the imprinting go. This is the reason why religion is introduced at a young age.  They want us to hold on to religion for life so that we’ll remain stuck in their illusion. The Jesuits believed that if they can get into our mind before age seven, then they will have us for life.

Of course, I prove them wrong every day. Speaking of clones, Jesuit Pope Francis, i.e., Pope Frankenstein, is the perfect example of a clone with a long shadow. He’s been completely exposed in recent times; and probably won’t be Poping for much longer. But when he first took his clone throne, people adored him. He was so charming, just like Luce. He said and did all the right things. That’s always the signature of a clone. I took a lot of heat for saying that Pope Frank was an actor and wasn’t a good man; I’ve since been redeemed.

Readers of my blogs/programs know that any supposed imprinting is just a bunch of false beliefs that we learned to hold in our minds.  We can let go of beliefs by seeing them as false from any age or time period.  We can even let go of ancestral beliefs. Early beliefs tend to be harder to let go because we’ve often manifested evidence of those beliefs. Early beliefs are often steeped with psychological reversal. We’ve made the beliefs real, so they look true; but that just proves that we’re good at manifesting shit we don’t actually want. If you let such beliefs go, then you stop creating that unwanted reality.

In my experience, there are no beliefs that we can’t let go.  But some beliefs require more persistence and determination to let go especially if those beliefs are collectively accepted as true. Labeling a belief, “the truth,” keeps us from being able to let it go. So the Jesuits are wrong.  Their belief serves them and their desire to control our minds and lives.  Nevertheless, this movie presumes that this Jesuit belief is true.

The event advertisement for the movie said that the film was about letting go.  But that was a statement made with level confusion. I’ve learned that most people think of letting go as physical, not mental.  Initiation is, and was, only about mental letting go. The physical becomes the effect of our mind as we let go. Most people think of letting go as divorcing your spouse, running away from home, or quitting your job.  Or they think that letting go is picking a nice thought over a crappy one or avoiding a touchy subject all together. None of those things are real letting go. I didn’t see any letting go in this movie. The lack of letting go is what turned the story into a heavy drama or a psychological thriller.

Luce was killing people with African terrorists from his toddler years to age seven.  It was presumed that this propensity to kill was still there, and he could not let it go.  Psychologists would say that this killer tendency was stuck in Luce’s subconscious.  Religious people might say that it was part of his soul. Eastern-minded people would say it was part of his karma. Everybody has a reason for why Luce can’t let go. Their reasons are all false beliefs. They make my job tedious.

Luce could have let go of his killer thinking; it was simply a bunch of beliefs that were not true. He would have had to let go of everything that he learned from Fanon. Luce’s mind would have psychologically reversed to hold on to Fanon’s beliefs and to make them true for him. So he’d have to realize that Fanon’s belief came with emotion, and that emotion meant the beliefs were false. Once he could see his error, then he could slowly take back control of his mental container. Everyone can get free, but they have to want it more than air. They have to be willing to let go of everything that is false, even if they think that it has served them.

The film portrayed this terrorist aspect of Luce’s mind as who Luce really was; that’s why Ms. Wilson and others believed that he was inherently dangerous.  That’s reality in the illusion. In initiation, we’re pushed to ask a bigger question. Is that true for Luce?  Of course not.  We have to be very careful when people say that some personality trait, or mental thought pattern (like transgenderism), is who a person really is.  We’re not our beliefs or our thoughts. If such people let go of everything in their mind, they would see that they’re not those qualities; they were holding on to a persistent false belief.

Because of this belief, Luce looked progressively more dangerous as the movie rolled on.  This is how people mentally devolve over time. Their friends and family don’t help them escape this fake, mentally-created illusion because they start to expect the worst from the person.

Letting go reverses this even when we have no support from others. I’ve done it. But it requires letting go from the feminine. We have to trust our emotions to get free of such a predicament. However, most people hate their emotions; they want to get rid of them. So they stay stuck.

Ms. Wilson was telling the truth.  But people thought that Ms. Wilson was lying because Luce looked so damn good. Ms. Wilson cared for a sister who was insane, and she contributed to making Ms. Wilson look bad.  Ms. Wilson also displayed appropriate emotions. By that, I mean that when she was lied to, she let the person know that they were lying; and she was noticeably uncomfortable doing that. Exposing lies isn’t in our nature; it’s hard to do it in a calm matter. In such situations, we often trust the liar because they’re the calm one. But they are calm because they think their lies are the truth…not because they’re not lying.

Ms. Wilson was reading Luce’s shadow. She was spot on. If others could do what Ms. Wilson was doing, they would have all supported her. She was the hero of this story, not Luce and certainly not Luce’s parents.

The story seemed to be loosely based on Barack Obama’s persona.  At one point, Luce likened himself to Barack Obama; he took the words right out of my mind. Like Obama, Luce was a good looking, popular, lawyer-like athlete who came from a rough start. Both were anti-colonialists and Marxists at the core. Obama had a mentor as a young child, Frank Marshall Davis, who was similar to Fanon in some ways.

Obama had a great clone, and he was very convincing. He still acts like he never had any scandals in his White House. That just isn’t true. But his scandals were hidden by the fake news media. Clones help other clones; and you end up with webs of clones in governments and other large organizations. Such lies don’t stay hidden forever. What’s hidden will become known because more and more people are whistleblowing and exposing just like Ms. Wilson. In Obama’s story, Ms. Wilson was played by Loretta Fuddy, who knew the truth about Obama’s fake birth certificate. She died in a strange plane accident. At times, I did fear that Ms. Wilson would not make it out of this movie alive. But she did.

In the Q&A, I realized that the screenwriter, J.C. Lee, didn’t see, or he didn’t admit, that the movie was a little too familiar. I wondered if he was like Ms. Wilson, and he had picked up Obama’s shadow without realizing it. It’s easy to do. I used to do that all the time before I came to understand clones and projection. I’d hear the projected covert part of the clone’s message in my mind. I’d think that their thoughts were my thoughts. After I learned to discriminate, I realized that the beliefs/thoughts that I was hearing weren’t true. I was hearing the opposite of what the person said; so it was their shadow. It wasn’t my thought so it was easy to let go as false. I experienced this every time President Obama spoke. He always had an overt and a covert message.

I suspect that’s what the screenwriter experienced. But he thought the projected thinking was his own thinking; he was not alone. Most people don’t watch their mind all the time like I do. So J.C. thought he had a great movie idea. He said that he invented the character of Luce about five years ago…uh that was when Barack Obama was president.  Coincidence? It’s just another interesting aspect to this film. It makes it even more fascinating to me.

The screenwriter said that he believed that someone telling the truth would be a heroic act, but no one does that.  That was probably why there wasn’t much truth telling in this movie. Wow!  That’s quite an admission.

The truth is what sets us free in initiation. The clone-free person is relieved to know the truth. Fear of clones is why people accept things like political correctness or social justice warriorism. Fear of clones is why people try to fit in and refuse to think independently. It’s why they ignore their emotions around others. They’re afraid of rocking the boat. In earlier times, if you exposed the clones in power, you were burned at the stake, tortured, banished from society, or beheaded. Today, we just get our accounts removed on social media.

J.C. said that humans are liars at the core.  So Luce was normal in his mindset.  That’s just NOT true. It’s not normal to lie; it’s learned behavior. No one is a liar at the core.  The further we get from our True Self, however, the more we lie. 

J.C. said that he personally faces the type of choices that Luce, Ms. Wilson, and Luce’s parents were making all the time.  J.C. was speaking truthfully about the illusion, but that would be false for someone who can let go.

J.C. said that he’s often in a situation where he either has to tell the truth and have a hard conversation, or he must lie and have a smooth conversation.  He did admit that this was a short-sighted point of view.  I’d agree with him on that. It’s also a false point of view. He said that he picks the smooth conversation 99% of the time. So he has a strong fear of clones…most people do.

Many would call such a lie a white lie.  I despise that term.  If you want freedom, you must stop lying…ditch all that political and social correctness too.  It’s never win-win…never. When you hide what you think from others, you start hiding it from yourself too. Then you just make a mess of your mind. If you let go of your judgments and beliefs, you eventually get to the place where what you think is not offensive or judgmental.  It’s helpful and constructive. It’s win-win. At that point, you always say what you think. 

J.C. did admit that this personal issue destroyed his relationships.  Well dah!  But he said that he could not change.  That’s sad, but I understand why he felt that way. His teenage years were during the Obama era.  He thought Obama was telling the truth, so he became like him.  J.C. is Luce in many ways. He admitted that. It’s a common pattern. Someone has a trusted teacher, philosopher, leader, idol, or guru; and they don’t realize that the person they idolized was giving them more beliefs. Then they get really stuck in that person’s shadow; and they can’t see any exit from their illusion. J.C. is not alone; but he’s living in an illusory bubble. That bubble will pop one day; and he’ll have one hell of a wake-up call. It happens to everyone; and it’s a hard moment, but it is the day that the potential for freedom returns.

Telling the truth, going for win-win, even when it’s hard is what sets us free.  No one in this film got free.  There was no full-circle ending.  That’s how you know the movie was based on beliefs.  We can’t get to a happily-ever-after ending with beliefs and lies.  That’s impossible.

This film was nothing like it was presented to be, at least from my point of view.  They said that the film was about the stories that we tell about ourselves.  It was actually about the stories, secrets, and lies we make up to cover our asses or to get attention or sympathy.

Then they said the film was about beliefs we need to let go.  But no one let go of any beliefs in the film.  They just lied to cover up the effects of their beliefs.  Or they ignored their beliefs.  Saying we need to let a belief go isn’t letting go.  Luce’s world was exhausting.  He had to manage appearances all the time.  

Here’s the weird thing about this film.  I really liked it.  Everyone did.  It was a good film.  I was letting go a lot, so I left without any baggage. It looked like cool fiction to me.  But others were noticeably triggered. I never saw so many people get up and walk around during a movie.  They were flooded with emotions, so they were walking them off. Clearly they had believed clones like Luce; and that was what they were feeling. So I like that J.C. was a bit of an exposer without even knowing it.

Here’s the potential for the happy, full-circle ending. It’s in Luce’s true desire, which we hear in his speech at the beginning of the movie. Luce said that he loved Independence Day.  He said the freedom of America meant everything to him.  There was his pull to initiation.  I call that our North Star. It’s what takes us outside of the illusion.

Luce wanted freedom, but he had this horrible false self.  That’s very normal. That’s where we all are when we begin initiation. None of that was Luce’s fault; but it was his responsibility. Luce could heal his mind. I know that. J.C. could too. Barack Obama could too. We all start out wanting freedom but not having it. At some point, if we don’t turn toward freedom, we develop apathy; then we just exist until we die.

Luce thought he could get freedom by creating a pleasing clone. That’s pretty normal too. Luce certainly wasn’t the first to think that.  Sadly, most experts believe that lie.  Too often people think that they can’t be themselves. They believe that they can’t have their true desires. They can, but they have to let go to get them.

As initiation takes us closer and closer to the core of our mind, we actually stop creating false desires (good and bad ones); it’s then that we start seeing the light at the end of the tunnel. We start remembering who we are and what we’ve always wanted from life; our life starts to make sense again. The world around us also starts to make sense. Clones look like clones, and the illusion looks like an illusion. Beliefs sound like beliefs. That’s mental freedom.

The Body (The Effect of the Mind)

Banyon tree as metaphor for initiation

By Cathy Eck

 

Physical is the Effect

My perspective of the body changed dramatically the day I read one of Edgar Cayce’s most famous quotes.  “Spirit is the life, mind is the builder, and physical is the result.”

Edgar Cayce was affectionately known as the “sleeping prophet.” For forty-three years (early 1900’s), Cayce put himself into an hypnotic state after lying on a couch, closing his eyes, and folding his hands over his stomach.  He would respond to questions as diverse as, “What are the secrets of the universe?” or “How can I remove a wart?” His responses came to be called “readings.”  As you know, I’m not a big fan of psychics or prophets.  Cayce interested me because I’d worked as a hypnotherapist and discovered that people were insanely honest under hypnosis.  With the conscious mind out of the way, they also got wiser.

Cayce spoke in the style of the Bible writers; I often found the same deep meaning in his words.  This eventually caused me to realize that we all have the truth inside; but we’re brain washed, so we look for the truth outside.

Prior to reading Cayce’s quote about the body/physical, I’d tried like hell to understand the body; but quite frankly, the perceptions and knowledge of experts sounded small, limited, and completely disempowering to me.  They spoke with conviction; and seemed far too comfortable with memorized knowledge.

 

Beliefs and the Body

Applying this quote wasn’t just about looking at my body and telling it that it looked beautiful or healthy.  It wasn’t about just numbing or releasing my stress or emotions.  It wasn’t about changing my outer world either.  I came to realize that my body knew if I was speaking from beliefs (lying); and it knew if I was believing other people instead of my Self.  My body simply wanted me to trust my True Self.  And that felt impossible at the time.

Believing lies and holding on to them, weakened my immune system; but I was scared not to believe experts in the beginning.  I feared that they were right because I’d not yet come to understand that beliefs generate emotion.  The doctor had no emotion when he spoke a diagnosis; but I felt overwhelmed with emotion when I heard it.  That’s the power of projection.  In the true world, the doctor would feel the overwhelm of emotion; s/he’s the source.  They wouldn’t be able to speak a belief or knowledge.  This is just one example of how the illusion puts us on the train to hell while telling us that we’re heaven bound.

Eventually, I realized that every belief that I held in mind was stored somewhere in my body.  If I could find the causal belief, the emotions left and the problem disappeared without any treatment.

 

The Way Out

In talking about Jesus, Cayce said, “He hath shown the way; not by some mysterious fluid, not by some unusual vibration, but by the simple method of living that which is life itself.  Think no evil; speak no evil; hear no evil.  And as the truth flows as a stream of life through the mind in all its phases or aspects, and purifies same, so will it purify, revivify and rejuvenate the body (294-183).”  Reading that was like, “Dah.”  Notice that he didn’t say to change our diet, meditate ourself into oblivion, raise our vibration, or twist our body into strange positions.  He said purify the mind.  Cayce’s words were often in sync with the initiation teachings.  But oddly, his readings that gave personal medical advice was just like any doctor or healer; he clearly didn’t believe that an ordinary Jill or Joe could do what initiates did.  That’s where we parted ways.  I did know that initiation was for anyone who wanted it.  I was an ordinary Jill.

In a Search for God group, Cayce was asked, “Is it possible for our bodies to be rejuvenated in this incarnation?”  He responded, “Possible.  The body is an atomic structure, the units of energy around which there are the movements of atomic forces that are ever the pattern of a universe.  Then, when these atoms are made to conform or rely upon or to be one with the spiritual import, the spiritual activity, then they revivify, then they make for constructive forces.  (262-85).”  But he then went on to say that rejuvenation wasn’t probable for anyone; most people weren’t inclined to do the intense work necessary to achieve the required mental state.  They’re too easily distracted by outer occurrences, i.e., the benefits of the illusion or fixing effects.

Most teachers today say that we can’t let go of our beliefs, at least not big ones, so we have to will our body or rise above it.  I disagree.  However, initiation isn’t a weekend workshop.  It’s a way of life.  It was said that Pythagoras spent decades in schools of initiation.  Cayce said that Jesus was initiated during his missing eighteen years.  People don’t realize how strong of a commitment they need for this path.  We hold beliefs about everything and everyone.

 

In the Beginning…

Years ago, I was sitting in my office and heard a loud voice in my mind speak, “Do you want to be beautiful on the inside or outside?”  I quickly answered “inside.”  I meant that answer; I wasn’t being proper.  This question was a bit of a trick to pull me inside.  My willingness to give up something that I held very dearly put me on this path.  I had to see my body free of fixing effects; that wasn’t easy.  But it was necessary for me.

Imagine how easy life would be if everyone’s physical body mirrored their mind.  No one could trick us.  Pure-minded people would be beautiful; those who hold beliefs would be ugly.  Fixing effects would be proof that you were an ugly person.  A lot of businesses would die a quick death.  And letting go would be the most popular game in town.

Rebellion and Denial aren’t Letting Go

Rebellion and Denial

By Cathy Eck

 

Are We Really Letting Go?

Taking action to fix a situation is fixing the effect of our beliefs, not letting go.  We’re often so used to fixing effects that we don’t even think to let go first.  Now that being said, we will probably continue to take actions to fix some effects for awhile.  Some problems have so much power that we have to gain proficiency in letting go and trusting our emotions before we don’t need to take any action at all.  Nevertheless, it’s important that we recognize if we’re fixing effects.  In this way, we can still let go after the fact and continue moving toward freedom.

For most of us, there are obvious problems that we know we must let go.  They’re in our face; and we can see that we need to let go of our beliefs around these issues.  Then there are problems or beliefs that we deny or rebel against.

We usually deny beliefs because we’ve become so proficient at fixing them with action or compensating beliefs that we forget we’re fixing effects.  We’re sure we no longer believe the things that we’re still fixing.  But if we stop fixing the effect for some reason, we’ll be reminded of that belief.  Let’s say we believe in evil, but we believe our religion will keep us safe from it.  Then we leave that religion, and we fear evil again.  In denial, we pretend a belief that we clearly hold as true doesn’t exist in our mind.  Denial facilitates projection.  When we deny beliefs, we see them in others but not in ourselves.  We often judge those who act out our beliefs.

In rebellion, it feels as if the belief is coming at us from others.  We have beliefs in our mind that say we must believe what some other person believes.  We can’t see that we hold the causal belief that allows this person into our mind.  Usually they’re an authority in our life.  We often think we can’t let go of their belief, so we do the opposite.

 

Rebellion

Many people think they are no longer rebelling when their opponent has stopped fighting.  The non-action appears to indicate resolution.  But we’re stuck on one side of the bottom of the triangle mentally with our opponent silently holding the opposite.  Justifying our position or saying we won can look a lot like freedom, but it isn’t.

Let’s say that our mother wants us to go to college.  We don’t go; in time, our mother doesn’t bring up the topic anymore.  It’s easy to think that we’ve resolved this issue.  But we haven’t.  College becomes the elephant in the room.  Our mother is always looking for a reason to point out what she perceives as our error.

Fortunately, if one lets go of the bottom of the triangle, the other must.  We dissolve the false self connection.  We must look at why we believe our mother’s beliefs or judgments of us.  If we see her beliefs or judgments as false, they will lose all power.  We’ll know without a doubt that our True Self guided us perfectly.

The best way that we can prove the rightness of our True Self is to let go of whatever others throw at us.  We must know that what they throw our way isn’t true for us.  People will do this until we can’t be rattled anymore.  Then they stop.  The elephant leaves the room.

 

Denial

Denial is a coping mechanism of our false self.  We’re living in a situation that we hate, but we tell ourselves it’s the way life is or we need to accept what is.  We need this job.  We’ll be lonely if we leave the marriage.  We might say we’re good for putting up with something that isn’t acceptable to us.  We might believe we don’t deserve more.  Often denial is masked in words of forgiveness or in trying to sound nice.  Denial is often a sign that we’ve become good at losing.

I was taught that being a good loser was virtuous.  I was told to considered losing part of life…you win some and you lose some.  But then I realized that win-lose wasn’t normal or true.  I had to let go of all my goodisms that made other people’s winning at my expense right — sayings like “accept what is” or “they did the best that they could” weren’t true.  We weren’t designed to accept intolerable situations, judgment from others, or living in small boxes.  We aren’t doing the best we can if we are living from beliefs.

The key to my relief was in recognizing that my True Self sorted the world based on true and false.  I wasn’t making someone bad or wrong by not believing them.  I was just choosing my own freedom; they could choose what they wanted for themselves.  Realizing that beliefs are false regardless of who imposes them on us is what frees us.

 

Ultimately, our life belongs to us.  It’s our journey, and we were meant to live from our True Self.  When we rebel against a belief that another possesses and tries to impose on us, or we deny that we have a belief, we remain stuck in the illusion and chained to others.  We stay stuck where we don’t belong.  We make actions right that have been fueled by false thinking.  We fight with others when there is really nothing to fight about.

As we get rid of rebellion and denial, we become more comfortable living our life.  We aren’t bothered by other people’s beliefs because we know that one can only harm themselves with their beliefs.  They can no longer project into our life and body.  Their beliefs do not impact us even if they think they should.  This is where real power begins to erupt within us.  We start to truly live as creators of our own life.

 

Win-Win and Our Bodies

An apple a day

By Cathy Eck

Lose-Lose

People often write to me asking for help with physical problems.  My body has been a huge challenge for me, mostly because the illusion is filled with beliefs about our bodies; and people in my life had rigid body beliefs and enormous trust in experts.  I, on the other hand, found the things that people do to fix their bodies repulsive.  I’ve had a lot to let go, and I’m not done.  But I do know where I’m going.  Here’s what I’ve learned.

The illusion is physically or effect oriented.  We see something wrong in our bodies, and we go to an expert.  We trust whatever they diagnose.  We put their knowledge in our mind and hope it fixes our problem.  We ignore the fact that experts see what they believe — projection.

We ignore our True Self’s wisdom and our own emotional discrimination that’s probably screaming at us.  We’ve given false masters dominion over our body in so many ways, usually out of fear.  Until we confront our fears, they lie under the surface waiting to trap us one day.  We’re playing the health lottery; and the odds of winning are decreasing every day.

Fixing the effects of our false thinking causes slow mental degradation.  We dive even deeper in the illusion every time we fix effects.  We’ve given our money and power to someone else; we’ve put them in a false masculine role over us without realizing it.  We’ll need them again because the cause isn’t really gone.  Eventually, we’ll encounter a problem that no expert can solve.  If we have no awareness of our True Self, that problem will kill us or severely deteriorate our quality of life.  It’s insane that we call that normal.

When the illusion wins, we ALL lose because everyone has fueled beliefs.  It gets harder for anyone to break free.  It’s imperative that we stop feeding the illusion.

Now don’t get me wrong.  I’m not saying to go cold turkey regarding fixing bodily effects.  Sometimes we have to fix or minimize the effects to get rid of enough fear to let go.  The best way to fix a bodily problem is to follow what we believe.  But later, when things calm down, we should look for the cause and let it go.

 

Win-Lose 

Start with the easy stuff.  Recently I saw a quiz on Facebook that said, “Are you toxic?”  I knew what it would ask:  How often do you work out?  Do you drink?  Smoke?  How many servings of fruit and vegetables do you eat daily?  Do you eat fast food?  As I suspected, all the questions were physically oriented.  State of mind was ignored completely.

Health is the illusion’s new religion.  Athletes and models are our false Gods.  We deem their bodies perfect and strive to look like them.  Whatever makes them beautiful, we’ll buy and copy.

We’re hard wired to trust beautiful people.  But we must make sure that we know what beautiful really looks like.

According to the Facebook quiz, everyone should feel guilty and buy cleanses and diet plans and hire personal trainers.  When we’re told what to do, we’ll either rebel or blindly follow.  Either way, we’re supporting the illusion.  We’ll never find the top of the triangle.  The false God is a marketing genius.

This is hard for many people to see.  If they’ve fixed something with knowledge, a program, or practice, they don’t feel the discord of their own beliefs and knowledge anymore.  They judge those who aren’t fixing their effects in the same way.  They’ve projected out their definition of wrong on to those who eat wrong (in their opinion) or don’t work out.  If they stop their practice, their projection will come right back to them.  When we fix effects, we have to keep the belief in the fix alive.

 

Win-Win

If we get to our True Self perspective, we’ll eat and do what’s right for us.  The ancient people said that the body was the effect of the mind.  If we let go of all body beliefs, we’ll end up bodily wise and beautiful.  However, I suspect that we’d not recognize such beauty today.

Let’s design this toxicity test from the ancient perspective:  Do you love drama?  Whine?  Judge others or yourself?  Do you criticize your body?  Do you fix the effects of your body’s problems?  Do you hold rigid food and exercise beliefs?  Do you believe experts over your True Self?  If so, you’re mentally toxic to yourself and others.  You’re perpetuating the illusion of health and beauty.

Real transformation comes from the inside out.  It’s slow; we go through an awkward stage that makes us constantly want to turn back.  We find more beliefs than we can even imagine.

The mental test represents a perspective that heals the mind and the body; the physical test fixes only the body/effect.  Jesus himself said, “Not that which goeth into the mouth defileth a man; but that which cometh out of the mouth, this defileth a man.” (King James Matthew 15:11)  I like to quote that when my Christian friends behave like food police — shuts them up in a hurry.

The mental win-win perspective is fair to everyone.  The homeless person can practice letting go and be healthy, beautiful, and happy just like the rich person.  Everyone can be uniquely beautiful.

Someone who wants to hold on to their false self won’t like the mental test.  But it’s time for those who benefit from the illusion to lose their false power.  Sadly, the people who say they love us and care for us are often the ones killing us with their rigid beliefs.  As we muster the courage to challenge their beliefs, our body relaxes and heals.  Our True Self stays in power; and we return to our natural state of health, joy, and beauty.

 

 

I Want Freedom BUT I Already Fixed That

Freedom from emotions

By Cathy Eck

 

People are becoming more and more aware of the illusion; they hide from it, vent about it, or feel like they’re stuck in a prison with no parole.  No wonder so many people are depressed.  Others fight the illusion or rebel against it, but they never win.  Why are we so afraid of this giant cartoon?

You see, if we’re bothered by another person’s illusion, it has taken up residence in our OWN mind.  Freedom is about destroying the beliefs in OUR mind that have cast us into roles in other people’s illusions.  We must realize that their illusion can’t affect us if we don’t believe it.  If we believe that we MUST fix another person or get them to see they’re wrong so we can be free, we still share their belief.  The more we let go, the more clear this becomes.

 

Fear Rules the Illusion

Letting go allows us to see that we’re all victims of the illusion; we’re not really victims of each other.  If we’re getting something we don’t want from another or from life, we believe that what we got is real or true; or we believe that the person who cast us in the feminine role has power over us.  Getting free requires using our emotions to go inside our mind and find our causal beliefs.

People want guns because they fear other people are bad and could harm them.  People join religions because they fear their soul was stained — they want a better afterlife or next life.  People adopt diets, exercise routines, or practices because they fear death, aging, weight problems, or illness.  People follow authority because they fear punishment.  People take jobs they hate because they fear being without money or believe they need the benefits.  Most of our doing is simply to counteract fear and paranoia.  It’s not creative.

Paranoia and fear make us vulnerable to clever marketing.  In fact, we can often see our beliefs by looking at what we’re tempted to buy.  We wouldn’t want to fix the problem if we didn’t still believe we had it.  You can be sure that the minute we fix one illusory fear, someone will find something else to scare the shit out of us  Then they sell us yet another product or service.  We win when we no longer believe we need anything from another — that’s freedom.

The True Self has no emotion because it holds no beliefs; the false self is filled with beliefs and emotions.  Emotions are the effect, not the cause.  So if we think we need a gun, we need to look at the beliefs causing our fear of other people.  If we think we need religion, we need to follow our fear of sin to the causal religious beliefs.  If we think we need our partner to spend more time with us, we must follow our emotion to our loneliness.  If we think we need a food or exercise regimen, we should follow our fear of illness or fat to find the causal beliefs that were probably learned from an expert.  As we let go, we’re relieving the experts, which have ruled our lives, of their duty.

Often we think that mental solutions fix the cause.  We’re attracted to spiritual teachers, mental techniques, and practices like positive thinking, visualization, meditation, yoga, Tai chi, EFT, new religions, hypnosis, or NLP because they seem to put new and improved beliefs in our mind or relieve our emotions.  Sometimes we grasp a moment of clear sight, which causes us to let go.  But that is rare and often not easily repeatable.  We eventually grow tired of these techniques too.  Now we’re ready to let go.

By the time that we realize this, we’re often exhausted.  We’ve tried so many things.  We have no desire to do much of anything; and that’s good.  We’re finally tired of fixing problems.   Fortunately, it doesn’t take physical energy to let go.  But it takes desire, persistence, and courage.  Then we see the horrible truth.  We meet all the things we thought we fixed because we didn’t fix the cause; we fixed the effects.  That’s a real “Oh FUCK!” moment.  It looks like we’re going backwards before we can go forward; this causes many people to quit letting go before they even get started unless they understand what’s going on.

 

Getting to Freedom

To get to freedom, we have to heighten our awareness of our own mental processing by witnessing our thinking.  We observe what we’re driven to do and constantly ask ourselves why we’re doing it.  We stop living on automatic.  We must get painfully honest with ourselves; and stop looking for others to fix our emotions and problems.  And we must stop fixing the emotions and problems of others.

“Why?” becomes our best friend.  Why am I feeling that I need to do this, be this, or want this?  Why do I think I need this product, practice, or person?  The answer points to the cause; and it won’t feel good.  But you now know that you were doing all that work or spending all that money only to fix a stupid belief that didn’t even feel good.

We have to realize that every time we fix the effect, we give the causal belief more power.   And that’s why we often feel so much emotion when we stop fixing the effects.  We’ve been covering that emotion with products, practices, or practitioners for a long time.  It’s like going cold turkey with an addiction.  Actually, the biggest addiction on this planet is fixing the effects of our beliefs to eliminate our emotional discomfort.  Nearly everyone has that addiction.   We thought we desired the thing that fixes the effect, but all those emotions were just begging us to remove the causal belief.  When we remove the false belief, the false desire disappears as well.  We won’t see that particular problem again.

 

 

Synchronicity or Validation? That is the Answer

Synchronicity or validation

By Cathy Eck

 

Holy Shit… My Life is on Stage

Last weekend, I bought some cheap tickets to a play at the La Jolla Playhouse.  I didn’t have a clue what the play was about.

It was called “The Who & The What.”  Obviously, the title didn’t offer any clues.  Turned out, the play was about a Muslim woman who was writing a novel about Mohammed as an ordinary seeker with a charismatic personality, rather than a prophet.  Her Mohammed had doubts about Christianity, got some answers via automatic writing, and even wondered himself if his answers were true.  He battled his own shortcomings; and like any seeker, he didn’t know truth from falsehood.

I suddenly felt as if I were watching my life on stage.  She spent four years writing her book… it was nearly twenty years ago that I first opened a word document for a book that I’ve not published.  Her family was horrified with what she was doing… been there too.  She argued that she loved to write and this was what she cared about… so did I.  Her family told her to use her writing ability on something else.  So did mine.  Quite frankly, the actress even looked like me with shorter hair.  It was easy for me to over-identify with her character.  It looked like pure synchronicity.

 

Synchronicity

I couldn’t wait to find out what happened to her as if she held my future in her hands.  I promise, I’ll tell you the ending later.  But first let’s talk about synchronicity.

I was very much into synchronicity in my old life.  I used divination tools to make choices. I even doused to find the well location for my previous country home.  I often looked for signs and symbols to show me the way, and I was delighted when I saw those interesting number patterns.  It happened frequently.  But one day, the magic stopped; I couldn’t understand why.

It took awhile to realize that synchronicity had morphed into something new.  For most people, synchronicity is about following outer signs and clues as if they’re looking for a lost treasure.  That makes good movies, but it doesn’t lead us to freedom.  It also generates excitement (which is an emotion); the illusion counts on us following our emotions.  Following emotion pulls us right to false desires.  False desires always come with hidden problems.  In addition, we’re never satiated because our true desires go unfulfilled.  We must give up the false to get the true; and hardly anyone is willing to do that.

 

Freedom

I wanted freedom.  I wanted to be my True Self.  I now understood that the world was the reflection of my OWN mind.  The True Self plus beliefs equals our reality.  Therefore, if I corrected my mind on any subject, by letting go, results or validation showed up in my life, my body, or my world.  After the internal change, came the external change.  It made sense.  It was exactly how life should be because it is inherently fair to everyone.   True synchronicity is a validation system, not a guidance system.

I now knew how to live the way cause and effect was designed.  To find the truth about anything, I’d let go; then I’d find the validation that proved I’d slain the false dragon.

After this discovery, I wasn’t interested in psychic readings, divination tools, or manifestation courses anymore.  I didn’t need more beliefs.  I had all the answers I needed inside of me.  Sadly, I looked arrogant and wrong to others.  How dare I to know my own answers?  They had no way to “serve” me.  Holy shit, I realized that all those people that appeared to be helping me actually thrived on fixing me.

Causes aren’t outside; they’re always inside our minds.  So why in hell would we think that our answers are outside of us?  Probably because we’re taught that God is outside — the false God is outside in the form of authority figures.  As we move to freedom, we know we’re the creators of our life.  We don’t listen to other people’s false advice — sometimes that pisses them off.

 

The Not-So-Happy Ending

In the play, the protagonist tried to ignore the hatred (disguised as caring) from her family, but she couldn’t; she didn’t know how to let go.  She musters up enough willpower to find a publisher, but her book doesn’t sell.  I was still watching my story.  Most garden club blogs have more readers than I do today.

As the play ended, I felt angry because the main character listened to her family’s worthless advice.  She decided that they knew best.  She gave up.  One should not expose Mohammed as normal.

I started walking home.  As I let my thoughts go, I realized that woman was me when I started writing this blog.  But she’s also me every time I expose a little more of the status quo as impotent and false.  Fear always arises to tell me that the illusory dragon is just too fierce.  It doesn’t get easier because I’m tackling different subjects.  Each time, I must let go, write what I’m inspired to write, and then the validation comes.  Writing isn’t my purpose; writing creates a reason to find courage and to test my ability to let go.

The growth of this freedom-loving community has been organic.  I don’t market, so the people who read my blog and participate in my mentorship program are truly the cream of the crop.  They’re here to receive validation for what they already know to be true.  When we stop looking for synchronicity as guidance, we become synchronicity as validation for others on their way out.  I’m grateful for the life that has unfolded as I’ve continued to write about what makes life worthwhile for me — initiation and freedom.  I wish I could tell that Muslim woman what she’s missing.  I wish I could help her let go so she could see that she was right.

 

Understanding Conspiracy Theory in the Illusion

Hero in an illusion

By Cathy Eck

 

Illusion Traps

I write this blog to expose the mental traps of the illusion.  I know them because I got caught in them myself and found the way out.  We’re all innocent victims of an illusion that was created a long time ago.  Jesus said that his perpetrators didn’t know what they were doing.  He was right.  They were playing their role in the illusion.

Conspiracy theorists do the same thing that I do — they expose.  But they’re not changing anything because they’re making a big mistake.

Conspiracy theorists focus on action.  They generate emotions in their listeners.  But they don’t resolve those emotions.  So they commit the same error as religion.  They make us afraid of the little man behind the curtain by convincing us that he has power.  That’s their error.  False beliefs have no power.  

Exposure is necessary.  We must first see a belief before we can let it go.  The conspiracy theorist is telling us someone else’s imaginary story.  But sadly, they make the story more real.  We should treat anyone’s illusory story like we treat a movie, but we don’t.  We fight their war or support their programs.  We take sides when neither side is worth taking.  We go into fear, panic, and terror.  We become even more obedient.  Conspiracy theory makes us believe the illusion more — not less.

When we believe another person’s illusion, whether it’s a religious, political, or even family illusion, we become blind and stupid.  Our intellect loves reasons and explanations.  Conspiracy theorists provide seemingly logical reasons for things that feel bad.  Religions have offered the same useless service.  But neither expose or fix the MENTAL cause of our problems.  An illusion, like a movie, can’t harm us unless we believe it.  We don’t need any more people who convince us that something false is true.

The first person to unconditionally love their opponent will always win.  True trumps false every time.  It’s hard to get to unconditional love when you’re being flooded with information about how despicable someone is.

 

An Example

Probably the biggest conspiracy is the evil illuminati.  People say there’s a secret group controlling the world.  Illusory games are about getting the most people to give their creative power away to a belief system.  In good and evil, people give their power to the minions of the old man in the sky.  In win-lose, they give it to the illuminati  — or some other little-man brotherhood.  The religious hate the brotherhoods and vice versa because they’re battling for the same minds.

We give our mind to leaders by believing they have power or authority.  We give our mind to them by accepting their beliefs as true.  We give our mind to them by giving our money to their programs, fighting their battles, and retelling their history.  The false Gods don’t care if we love them or hate them.  They only care that we believe them.

Conspiracy and religion both focus on actions — what someone did.  To get to the True Self, we must clear beliefs and ignore actions.

Our mind falsely tells us that the effects prove the beliefs are true when they’re actually proof that we believed the system was the truth.

Conspiracy and religion are on opposing sides of the same illusion, that’s why religious people go crazy over conspiracy.

If we play a role in an illusion, we’re an actor.  We can only be a true hero when we discover and live from our True Self.

 

The Illusion of Goodness

As our minds have evolved, people have learned to project both sides of duality outside while standing comfortably in the false center looking like a God.  The false center looks balanced and good.  Barack Obama is playing this role now.  He doesn’t know why the democrats and republicans can’t just get along.  Both sides are the reflection of his own split mind; but no one, including Obama, realizes that.  He thinks he’s a victim.

George Bush projected his inner terrorist (evil doers) outside of him while he watched 9/11 in a completely nonplussed state.  He was the good guy — whole and complete.  His shadow was attacking his own people.  He wasn’t concerned that people were dying in his illusion.  He was watching his illusion play out on the big screen of life, and he was the good guy — the hero and God.

Conspiracy theorists went wild after 9/11 because they wanted to know the cause.  The cause was George Bush’s Fundamentalist Christian belief in evil.  The conspiracy theorists were too busy looking at actions to see the mental cause.  No one said, “Hey let’s drop the belief in terrorism.  It’s a lie.”  When we think of terrorism, it feels terrible because it’s false.  Evil is always a FALSE projection. But George Bush is an authority; and when an authority says “Be afraid,” the sheep obey.

Conspiracy theorists tried to fix the situation.  They said, “Hey the enemy is in America.”  On the mental level, they were right.  George Bush was the leader of America; and he believed in terrorism.  So technically the cause was in America.  But the cause wasn’t in his physical actions, it was in his mind.

 

The Answer

We need to go back to the way our emotions were designed.  When we feel emotions, we stop.  We look at what we’re thinking or hearing in that moment.  We realize it’s false, and we let it go even if everyone in the whole world believes it.  Conspiracy theorists expose the hiding place of lies.  If we let those lies go, they lose power quickly.  If we can unconditionally love the liars, the little men quickly drop off their big high pedestals.

When we let go, we no longer remain caught in the stories of others.  We stop playing roles in other people’s illusions.  We take back our power as the directors, writers, and actors in our own story; we’re free.

 

 

 

Facing Our Fears the Initiate’s Way

Facing our fears

By Cathy Eck

 

Facing Our Fears 

There’s a popular book called, “Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway.”  I’ve never read it, but I’ve heard plenty of people quote it.  The title says it all.

The underlying premise of “doing it anyway” is that our fears (or any emotions) have no purpose except to annoy the hell out of us. We need to get rid of them; and if we want to achieve anything in life, we need to will our fears into submission.  Personally, I think that’s an arrogant assumption.  We were all born with emotions; they obviously have a purpose.

So what should we do with fear or any other emotion?  How were we designed?

 

Initiate’s View of Facing Our Fears

The initiates saw facing our fears in a very different way.  When you understand their point of view, life gets much easier. Initiates didn’t differentiate between emotions.

Try this experiment.  Think of a situation that scared you, and feel the emotion in your body.  Now think of something that made you angry, and feel the emotion in your body.  Now think of something that excited you, and you’ll find the same emotion in your body. You might feel the emotions in a different place or with different intensity, but the feeling of all emotions is virtually the same.

The label that we place on our emotions is an intellectual decision based on the circumstances.  Our emotions don’t have labels.  So taking off the label is the first step to using our emotions correctly.  Emotions aren’t fear, anger, grief, or shame.  They are a signal that our mind needs correcting.

As you know from my other articles, emotions were considered a signal to the initiate that they were thinking wrongly (falsely).  The mind was seen as a container of thought. While we’re all connected as one at the level of the truth (True Self), our false selves were designed to be individual and separate. This was so we could all create uniquely.  Each of us could have different ideas and beliefs and experience different lives.  But as you know, people started to control what others believed.  Humans started to fear and believe authority and accept other people’s beliefs as their own.  We also accepted the belief, “If it’s true for them, it’s true for me.”  Consequently, people became connected (or one) at the false self level.  Big mistake!!!

Emotions were simply a sign from our True Self to let go of the belief that was causing the emotion.  So, from the initiates’ perspective, keeping a belief, ignoring or facing our fears, and doing it anyway was a prescription for suicide.  The initiates understood that beliefs are the cause of our life experience.  The effect is the emotional warning that such cause (belief) is leading us down the wrong path; and if we ignore that emotional warning signal, we may not like the outcome.

To complicate things more, we often think that our emotions are caused by others.  Often they are, but it’s because we believe what they’re saying.  So our emotions are still caused by us.  But retraining our mind takes effort because we were trained to believe others and obey them, especially authority figures.

 

What Do We Do With Emotions?

This sounds incredibly strange at first.  Only your True Self can understand it.  Facing our fears makes sense to our false self; it equates letting go with dying or disappearing.

It took me a long time to figure this out because my own false mind kept replaying its faulty tapes.  But I realized it didn’t hurt to try.  And when I tried it, I liked it.

Our emotions tell us when a causal thought is false.  Most of what normal people think is false.  They’d be emotional all the time so they reverse their internal system creating psychological reversal, causing them to appear unemotional.  They are mentally wired to win in the illusion, not live authentically.

If you let a causal thought go, the related emotions disappear. Imagine that you’re talking with someone who makes you very angry. The anger is caused by the fact that you believe what they said; they were simply spouting off their beliefs.  If another person tells a complete lie, you won’t get emotional unless you believe their lie.  Our bodies are designed to be magnificent lie detectors. People in power messed with our signaling systems so they could lie, and we wouldn’t know it.  Other times we’re feeling emotion as an effect of what we thought or judged about the other person.  Most people think that the emotion confirms that their judgment of the other is correct.  It’s actually proof that their judgment is false. It doesn’t matter what the person has said or done in the past, our minds are wired to help us let go of judgments and see the True Self in everyone.

 

Thoughts Matter

Most people are other directed.  To heal our minds, we must become inner directed.  The ancient Greeks said, “Know Thyself.”  They meant know your thinking — your mind.  Jesus said, “It’s not what goes into the mouth that defiles a man, but what comes out of the mouth.” He wasn’t talking about food choices or vomit.  He was talking about words.  Our words come from our mind, our thoughts, our beliefs.  Using our emotions as our guide frees our minds from beliefs and purifies our words.

Our beliefs create our reality.  When we listen to our emotions and let our beliefs go, our minds becomes free and our bodies become calm.  We have returned to the mental state from which we were born. The initiates called this being reborn of a virgin.  We begin life again, but this time we know how to stay free.

 

People also believe that life is a struggle, but that’s wrong too. If we do the right struggle by becoming mentally free, we don’t have to do the physical struggle.  Read more here.