Time: Good or Evil

Right place and right time

By Cathy Eck

 

Time — Hijacked by the Illusion

I’ve known people who stopped wearing watches because they hated time but then drove everyone crazy by constantly asking for the time.  Their behavior created the appearance of freedom; but it’s actually harder to ask someone for the time than to just look at our watch.  Some rebel against time by showing up when they want.  Those of us who aren’t rebelling against the clock, waste our time waiting for them.  People like to make time the bad guy when it’s really our beliefs about time that are the problem.

Many teachers talk about transcending time.  They’re usually the same ones that like to float above their reality.  I once got an email from someone wanting to know if I could help him time travel so he could be with his lost lover again.  People try to outsmart or manipulate time because they view it as a prison.  Time is a constraint; but it doesn’t have to limit our freedom if we keep it in the realm of first-cause creation.

Nature shows us first-cause time.  Day and night and the seasons are natural, but equal, constraints.  If we’re in tune with the earth, we’ll know when to plant or harvest.  We’ll find our rhythm in the earth’s cycle. If we synchronize with Mother Earth’s clock, we won’t be near the ocean when the tsunami arrives.  You see this with animals.  No one needs to give a beluga whale, a grey squirrel, or a red robin a calendar or a warning signal.  But humans have something that animals don’t…false minds.  Our false minds destroy our natural connection to the planet.  In fact, our false mind tells us that it will keep us safe when it actually put us in danger.

A long time ago, we fell; and our prize was a brand spanking new false self/mind.  Our seeming fall could have been a graceful trip down the river to a more creative material world.  We simply gained a cool conscious outer perspective.  We could now divide our thoughts into opposites, musical notes, and colors.  We could hold memories and ideas in mind and manifest them in the material world.  This was the coolest thing ever invented.  We each had a mind of our own.  We were all capable of first-cause creation — created mentally in the image and likeness of the Creator.  Time and space were just part of our tool box.  They made life interesting.

Time and space created different points of view depending on our location.  Stories were extracted out of the night sky; and different people saw different animals, superheroes, Gods, and Goddesses.  This became astrology, which is a function of the location and time that we’re born.

 

Second-Cause Creation

Second-cause creation made story more interesting with drama and judgment.  Some personality qualities were good and some were bad.  Some actions were good and some bad.  Some people had good astrological charts and some had charts that sucked.  We also added the elements of authority, roles, and evil.  Controlling space and time was now used to gain power over others.

Second-cause creation utilized history (his story) where time and events became very specific and intricately linked.  We were told to memorialize dates from the past.  We couldn’t just naturally let go of the past anymore.  We were told when to work and when to play.  And since we held on to the past, the past kept repeating.  Our future was now driven by what we held in mind — our memories and rigid beliefs.

We were seduced into giving up our independent notion of time because we were given planned gatherings, festivals, holy days, and holidays.  Those were our rewards.  Such fun times were used for the same purpose that a rapist grooms his future victim.  The victim loves the candy and attention, but doesn’t realize that the excitement they feel means that something bad is coming.  The non-holidays came to feel like punishment because that’s when we had to do the hard work.

Ancient astrologers/astronomers were called Wise Men.  They worked for the royals; they could read the stars.  They decided who would rise to power and who would be a slave.  They wrote the stories of the illusion.  They said that the stars determined our fate, not our thoughts.  We were no longer the creator of our life.  We now had a role in a grand story that we were told God wrote, when it was really written by the Wise Men.

Religions created calendars to synchronize people.  Controlling time helped to control people.

 

Returning to First Cause

Rebelling and throwing out calendars and clocks isn’t the answer.  We simply have to get back to first-cause thinking about the calendar — use it for convenience and coordination.  It’s a tool, not a God to worship.  We have to recognize that our mind creates our life, not our star signs or “the man.”  A calendar can give us a useful construct, but the date on the calendar should not tell us what to do, what to say, or how to be.  We are free when we do what we’re inspired to do everyday.

Breaking free of the traditions, rituals, and organized events of the illusion can be quite a challenge.  We can look like a real party pooper if we don’t do the inner work first.  In my experience, as my mind returned to first-cause regarding the calendar, people just worked in harmony with me.  I didn’t have to make a grand statement that time was evil.  Coordinating became pretty natural.  I didn’t have to fight the calendar to the death.  I just started living as if every day was a holiday.

We only need to remove our beliefs about time from our mind.  Then time serves us instead of us serving time.  Prisoners are said to serve time; and when we live in the illusion, that’s exactly what we’re doing.

Who’s Writing Our Story?

Happily Ever After

By Cathy Eck

 

One of the best ways to learn about life is to study stories.  Reading fiction, devouring biographies, and immersing myself in movies has taught me so much.  But to mine wisdom from stories, we must discriminate between true and false, feel our emotions, and understand roles.

Story writing mirrors what goes on within our minds during the creative process.  The True Self is the father and the physical world is the mother; the child is our story (the effect).  In order to have interesting stories, it’s necessary to go beyond the purely win-win nature of the True Self.  The mother does this by dividing thought without judgment (called first-cause creation or wisdom).  Second-cause creation happens when a false masculine role divides thoughts in a judgmental way — win/lose, good/evil, etc.  This is referred to as knowledge.  A perfectly crafted story starts in the True Self, filters through the knowledgeable false self, and emerges into the physical world.

 

Desire

A story falls flat if the protagonist doesn’t want anything.  Some protagonists have a True Self desire like finding unconditional love, peace of mind, or freedom.  But other protagonists have desires such as serving their country, revenge, or getting rich.  These are stories without an exit from the illusion.  However, occasionally what looks like a false outer desire is actually a metaphor for the part of the person’s True Self (inner desire) that they think they’ve lost.  Ancient stories are nearly always this way, and companies like Disney are masters of this formula.

If we have a strong desire, we contain the necessary feminine wisdom within to fulfill that desire (alchemical marriage).  But often, we look to masculine knowledge/beliefs for the answer (labeled as two men sleeping together in the ancient world).  Desire and fulfillment are side-by-side until we introduce beliefs/knowledge.

 

Beliefs

A great story is a dance between unrelenting desire and the obstacles that keep it from being fulfilled.  Beliefs give birth to obstacles.  The more beliefs we have, the more obstacles between us and our desire.  It’s a simple formula.  But if the obstacles are too complex, we’ll give up.  The ultimate giving up is dying.

One could make a strong case that the purpose of life is to be dropped into a physically oriented world where everyone wants us to play a part in an unsatisfying collective production instead of playing the lead role in our own production.  Following authority figures and accepting their beliefs casts us into a role in the collective story; it keeps us from living our story.  Until we wake up…

 

First Act

Our unrelenting desire is formed early in our story.  Something in life goes off track, or we accept a big belief system; now we have a desire to get back to our True Self.  This is called the inciting incident.  We might have a huge life-changing loss, or we might have a slow deterioration of our desire until it appears unattainable.  When the desire has lost it’s spark, we’ve abandoned our personal story.   We’re lost in the illusory maze.

Once we write off our desire, our story changes from an interesting screenplay with a strong theme to a long, dull ridiculously dramatic soap opera.  That’s the illusion.  We go from drama to drama without any real conclusion.  Drama can even become addictive since it relieves boredom; and the illusion is very slow and boring.

 

Second Act

In the second act, we meet obstacles created by the beliefs we accepted from authority.  We thought the illusion was going to be fun; it’s actually filled with problems and suffering.  Our false self was meant to be a creative container, but now it’s filled with knowledge and beliefs.   We fit it and even accept what is… UNTIL… we come to a cliff, and our enemy is right behind us — we must j-u-m-p.  We must let go in order to live; part of our false self must die in order for our body to continue to live.  This is often the theme of a great exit story.  Death or facing death forces us to let go.

If we won’t drop our beliefs, we’ve got a serious story problem.  We’re stuck in the second act.  We’re seeking, which is trying to find something within the illusion that only exists outside of the illusion.  Sound familiar?   We’ll try to change the illusion’s story to something nicer or create false exit doors.   But, only the author of the story can change it; they have the masculine role.  We might even pretend to be satisfied, but we aren’t; acceptance is often apathy in disguise.

Take the Jesus story.  Christians massacred the real ending, which was that we all find the Christ (True Self) within; and they changed it to Jesus returning.  But he never does.  Even if he did, they’d kill him because they hate the True Self.  Jesus, to a Christian would look like the part of themselves that they view as evil — the part that won’t obey their rules.  The people who read my blog have often played the role of Jesus to a believer; and the believer crucified them.

 

Third Act

As we move toward our True Self by letting go, we gain the masculine role in our lives.  We realize that all the characters in our life are actually in our OWN mind.  We must ask:  Which characters advance our story?  Which ones are nothing but an obstacle?  The obstacles have to lose their false power (become supporting cast) or leave the story.

Imagine that you’re a really lost character.  You might invent a wise helper character to play with, like Merlin to Arthur.  Or you could create a transformative experience, like Buddha.  Or you could find the mysterious blog that shows you how to let go of your beliefs and unlock your desires.  You see if you’re here, you’re working on that third act; and now you have the tools to create a great ending — a real, eternal happily ever after.

Storytelling or History: What’s the Difference?

Footprints in the Sand

By Cathy Eck

 

Storytelling Versus History

I enjoy stories very much.  I love to read them, to write them, and to watch them on the big screen.  But I don’t like history at all.  History is usually presented by the winners; it’s masculine-dominant (his story, not her story) and fact driven, not character driven.  In short, it’s food for the intellect, the false self.

The difference between storytelling and history has become blurred in people’s minds because our educational systems emphasize history over storytelling.  We can learn a lot by studying the difference between storytelling and history.

If we want to write a story, we first develop characters and maybe a plot or a story idea.  We give the characters a false-self perspective, including a back story, preferences, and beliefs.  Then we turn the characters loose and let them interact.  If the characters don’t like the results they’re getting, they’ll hopefully have a change of mind.  If the characters don’t change their mind, the story eventually becomes predictable and boring.  If the characters don’t grow, viewers will stop feeling sympathy for their troubles.

We see these things clearly on the big screen, but often ignore them in our own lives.  Suffering isn’t natural; it’s the consequence of being unwilling to expand our perspective and grow.  Suffering comes from holding on to what we no longer need.  Mental hoarding, just like physical hoarding, is destructive.

 

Life is Storytelling

We’re all living a potentially great story whether we know it or not.  Two decades ago, the Story of “The Legend spontaneously popped out of my unconscious.  That began my exploration into the nature of storytelling.  I could see that “The Legend” was like an undercurrent in my life.  Fairy tales, myths, and religious stories sit in our unconscious as causal forces in our life.  This is why religions and cultures are built on a foundation of storytelling.  We’re controlled by the stories we hold in mind as true.  If we share a common foundation of story with another, we’ll have similar beliefs and see the world through homogeneous eyes.

Modern video games take storytelling to a new level.  I used to watch my children play them, moving from level to level.  If their character screwed up, they’d say, “Oh, I died.”  They’d restart the game.  I felt as though I was watching a miniature version of life.  You either make it to the next level in your storyline, or you die.  The difference is that the gamer realizes he’s responsible for his fate.

 

His Story

History is literal.  There’s no room for individuality or interpretation.  It’s simply the reporting of facts — names, dates, and physical events.  History is always one-sided; usually the winners write history.  As we’ve become more left-brained or intellectual, we’ve forgotten the cause and effect relationship in life.  We fail to consider that every event has a belief-related cause behind it.  We accept the winner’s false-self projection that their enemy is evil and deserving of punishment.

Today, people share their personal stories in historical form.  They think they’re storytelling, but they aren’t.  Great stories allow for change; and great storytellers allow their characters to transform.  People have labeled the oldest stories mythology because they find so many versions of the old stories.  Old stories changed as the characters changed.  History put an end to that; history keeps us stuck within a false, collective mindset.

 

The Key

The true storyteller knew that he created every single character, even the evil ones.  The historian only identifies with one character — the one they label good or right.  

The historian acts as if he or she is either a hero or victim.  They’re telling the story to get sympathy, attention, or approval.  If they get such rewards, they’ll continue to tell the story to keep it alive.

Often we get stuck in another person’s story; we feel like we can’t get free.  We feel bad if we expose another as cause in their drama because we’ve been trained to feel guilty for revealing the cause of history.  We aren’t supposed to point out that the Emperor is naked.

 

Freedom

Freedom requires owning all the characters in our story and seeing that they fit together like a puzzle.  The victim and perpetrator/hero are opposites who have divided thought in the same way (see the triangle process); and the evil that the hero fights is simply his or her shadow.

The psychologist Fritz Perls popularized Gestalt therapy.  Perls studied people’s dreams.  He required them to see themselves as every character and even every essential item in the dream.  In this way, they could step back and see their whole mind; they could see themselves as cause.  When we see our whole mind, we see the mental cause of our problems.  Then we can change our mind more easily.

 

We’re All Storytelling

Many have said that we’re all storytelling.  We invent a story; then ideally we direct, produce, and star in it.  But when we don’t own our mind, we just play a walk-on part in someone else’s drama.  When we follow the false mind (which we acquired from others) over our heart (True Self), our own story remains unlived and untold.  We don’t grow or change.  Life becomes boring, and we feel without purpose.

This happens when we accept masculine and feminine roles; and we place ourselves in a feminine role to another.  Dropping roles that don’t bring us joy is key to returning to our own original story.

Screenwriters say that the audience wants an inciting incident (usually a fall of sorts) in the first ten minutes.  From the perspective of story, we plan our fall into the illusion.  You probably lived that part of your story.  But what happened after that.  Did you learn?  Did you grow?  Did you change?  Did you let go of your “evil” shadow?  Did you love?  That’s what makes a story great.  And most important, did you get that precious and rare happily ever after?

Your Unique and Valuable Story

Unique and perfect
By Cathy Eck
“Always remember that you are absolutely unique. Just like everyone else.”
-Margaret Mead

 

Uniqueness

I love the above quote.  About a month ago, I pulled my “Freedom Astrology” work off the shelf.  It’s really got me thinking about uniqueness.

Freedom astrology is nothing like traditional astrology.  It evolved from my understanding of ancient storytelling and wanting to understand how one gets their unique perspective on life.  I realized that I could look at someone’s astrology chart and craft a unique story.  Each person’s story was completely unique like our fingerprints.  In addition, the stories transcended time, offering an eagle’s eye view of their life.

 

We’re All Storytellers

We’ve shared stories for thousands of years.  That’s why we love stories so much; we’re all telling a story with our life whether we know it or not.  But the stories people tell in social circles about their trip to the doctor or their fight with their spouse aren’t real stories.  Here’s why.

The first stories came from the stars — nomads lying on the desert sand with nothing to do at night invented characters and stories.  As time went on, the stories became more and more evolved.  The major characters became patterns for normal ways of being and interacting.

These star stories provided a framework for people’s lives.  Like a house blueprint, the story provides the overall structure.  A house blueprint is changeable, and it doesn’t describe the colors, decorations, or furniture.  In the same way, one’s unique star story is malleable.

Our story is part of our false self, and we can let it go completely — that’s complete freedom.  But we accept our star story with the desire to complete it.  And when we let go of all the beliefs we’ve borrowed from others, the story does make sense; we usually want to live it to completion.  It’s our reason for being.

 

Stories Aren’t Cast in Stone

Religions cast stories in stone structures to make them last beyond their normal lifespan.  Stories were designed to be flexible and temporary so we store them in our false self.

Once people became power-hungry, they decided that the leader’s story should dominate the lives the entire kingdom forever.  The notion of the personal story was replaced by the group story.  No one can live a story like the writer, so this way of viewing life made sure that the leader would be the most successful and powerful person.  Christianity did this with Jesus’ story — no one can be Jesus like Jesus.  But Jesus would also have a really hard time being you.

 

The Fall

The original stories had a beginning that was perfect and Eden-like (Act I).  Then there was a fall (Act II), and last they resurrected themselves and came full circle (Act III).  You might recognize this as Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey or the three-act play.

Western religion falsely started our lives with the fall (Act II).  They told us that Adam and Eve were in Eden, but we weren’t.  When a story starts at the wrong place, it keeps us stuck.  It erases our memory of perfection causing us to think our desires are ridiculous or imaginary.  Religion also made the resurrection part of the story (Act III) unachievable for us mortals.  If we were never in Eden and we can’t resurrect ourselves from the illusion, guess where we stay stuck forever?

When people read their star story, they’re struck by the fact that Act I and III are there.  This creates a huge perspective change.  Everyone can do the same thing by accepting Eden as their original starting place (Home) and realizing that we’re meant to return Home in this life.  Doing so expands your perspective like nothing else can.  It exposes your false beliefs.

All three acts of one’s star story come from the natal astrology chart based on birth time and location.  I see the different acts or perspectives by changing my point of view.  As I go into the fall part of the story, I see the beliefs that pulled the character into the illusion and feel emotions arise in my body to the point of huge discomfort, then as I move into the resurrection or return to Eden, the beliefs and emotions go.

In the end, I feel unconditional love for the person.  That’s proof that I’ve completed the cycle.  I see them as free and perfect.  It reminds me that what we don’t like in another is only the result of viewing them from a fallen perspective.

 

Don’t Accept What Is

Religion and the New Age have sold the notion of accepting what is.  Absolute bullshit!  There is no one that can’t get Home in one life based on what I’ve seen in these stories.  Religion blocks that by making beliefs the truth and convincing us that we were never in Eden and won’t be returning.

The number one criteria for returning to Heaven on Earth is being unwilling to accept less than perfection in your life, to constantly challenge the status quo.

 

Boring Reality Stories

People make events into their stories, which is why their stories are so boring.  The star stories have characters and events that represents patterns of thought.  We’re all taking mental journeys that produce physical effects.  Likewise each person we encounter in life is an aspect of our mind.

The point of life on earth is to complete our story and get back Home.  It doesn’t matter if you’re the poorest person on earth or homeless.  It doesn’t matter if you never went to school.  It doesn’t matter if you’ve gotten completely off track.  Everyone has the same chance of success when we’re playing the right game.  There’s no competition.

Everyone can play and win.  The notion that everyone is equal and unique with a unique story-driven experience is powerful.  It opens up the possibility that everything can become right again for everybody.  That  just makes me smile.

 

Here’s more on the Power of Story.