Problems: The Gift that Keeps on Taking in the Illusion

It's not what we do, it's why we do it.

By Cathy Eck

 

Problems?

My dad was an engineer.  He loved to take things apart and put them back together.  He loved fixing things.  When we would break something, he was thrilled.  He got a chance to fix something.  He often said, “There isn’t anything that can’t be fixed.”  I loved those words, but I didn’t like problems.  In fact, I hated them.

While he was clearly talking about the material world and stuff, I heard his words on a completely different level.  His words fueled my quest to fix my mind and my body, even when others said it wasn’t possible.  His words provided a valuable reminder as I took my own mind apart that it could be fixed.  I thought I’d have to put my mind back together once I got all the pieces spread all over the floor.  But most of the pieces were unnecessary.  They weren’t keeping my body running or making my life better. They were just causing problems.  These unnecessary mental components weren’t true or necessary for joyful expression; they were simply someone else’s worthless beliefs that were like parasites.  They sucked the life out of me while giving nothing in return.

My dad was passionate about fixing things; he used his passion to help us out when needed.  But, he didn’t break things just to fix them.  If he couldn’t find anything to fix, he used his talents creatively by finding things to build.  He enjoyed the bottom of the triangle illusory state of fixing and breaking if the opportunity arose to play there, but he used it in a way that didn’t harm others.  He showed me that the illusion can be a sort of playground if we don’t take it seriously or force it on others.

 

Fixing and Breaking

The bottom of the triangle isn’t bad if used in a win-win way (directed by the True Self).  Old buildings must be destroyed before a new one can be erected.  Likewise, we destroy our false mind so we can rebuild it.  If we know the difference between True and false and creating from First (win-win) and Second (win-lose, good-evil) Cause, we can live outside the suffering that most people consider normal.  We avoid creating problems, and we can help others leave their problems behind if they ask for help.

As long as people break things, we’ll need people who fix them.  Nevertheless, we must understand how to use our talents properly on the way out of the illusion.  On the way into the illusion, we project our beliefs on to others and then fix the effect of our projection in the others.  We retain unwanted beliefs, often for financial gain.

I first noticed the power of win-win when I worked in technology. Someone would call me for tech support, and I’d just talk with them.  Often I had no clue what their problem was, and I sure as hell didn’t know the answer.  But they did.  If I talked in the correct general direction, they solved the problem themselves.  My clients were all becoming computer experts. They became confident that they could fix their own problems.  That made my job really easy.  I could focus on creating new ideas and products instead of fixing other people’s problems.  We were both happier.

This only works if we can see our creative potential, and if we don’t believe that we need customers for life.  I think dentistry is the worst example of second-cause creation.  They tell their patients to come in every six months so they can look for the problems that they expect to find so they can fill, drill, and bill.  I recently read a study that said people with the best teeth often don’t go to the dentist much.  Made sense to me.

Dentists, and other service people, don’t have to walk away from their professions; there’s a proper transition toward freedom.  First, they become a dentist that expects to find perfect teeth.  They do that by letting go of their knowledge and labels for problems; they recognize that problems come from beliefs and many of those beliefs are perpetuated by them.  In accounting, they’d call their expensive dental schooling a sunk cost.  It has no future value so you just write it off and move on.  They slowly wean their clients off of them and follow their creative inspiration to a better life.

 

The Lesson

With my dad, we were willing supporters in something that brought him fun.  Fixing stuff is clearly part of the illusion, but it was a fun, first-cause part of the illusion for him.  We didn’t need to break things to please him.  Often he involved us in the fixing process, contributing to our self-sufficiency and confidence that “Anything could be fixed if it happened to break.”   His knowledge wasn’t bad because it was directed by his True Self.  He still fixes things in his community for a cookie or beer, but only if asked to do so.

The dentist (and most fixers) make knowledge (expertise) more powerful than wisdom (truth).  He or she projects problems by believing that they’re true.  When I was little, I screamed when taken to the dentist.  I noticed they often had ugly or highly repaired teeth.  I felt their convoluted energy as they projected their flawed point of view on me.  Their beliefs got them bad teeth, and now they wanted me to have them too.  That’s second-cause creation; it’s how we perpetuate the illusion.

As we move through the path of initiation, we’re letting go of second-cause creations, beliefs, and memories.  They weren’t necessary parts of our mind or our life so we won’t miss them.  They were problems that only existed in the illusion — they appeared real but weren’t true.  After we trash these unwanted and unneeded components of our mind, we see that they created unnecessary detours and problems in our life.  We won’t ever make that mistake again.

What If I Like My Beliefs? What Do I do With Annoying Believers? Etc.

apple a day

By Cathy Eck

 

Beliefs and Believers

Beliefs aren’t really a problem if we truly understand that they’re all false. Believers of all sorts fear other peoples’ beliefs; they think the others’ beliefs can affect them.  Beliefs can’t affect us unless we believe them.  Really!  Likewise, prophecy only affects people who accept it as true.

This wisdom makes life inherently fair.  But believers do need opposition to take their imaginary punishments.  For a long time, I feared believers; that fear cast me into unwanted roles within their illusions.  Once I no longer believed them, they lost their false power over me.

People with strong beliefs challenge us during initiation.   They show us what we still believe.  That’s a valuable service.  We also get to practice not judging them for having beliefs.  They’re living a false illusion; but they aren’t bad.

Beliefs die a natural death without human fuel.  Consequently, believers hate when we ignore them; but too often we argue with them.  Arguing puts us on their false level.  We lose when they say we offend them.  We’ll lose if they trigger doubt in us by pulling out an out-of-context Bible verse.  Many Food Police would reel me in with their charisma as they talked about their bullshit belief of the day.  Believers are always armed and ready to defend their beliefs.

Resist their pull to battle; it only gives them power.  Just realize that their beliefs are false and let them go.  In this way, you stay in power.  You see, us nonbelievers aren’t psychologically reversed like them, we feel the emotions that they should feel since they just lied.  But they believe they spoke the one-and-only truth — they feel nothing.  In most any battle, the emotional person loses.  Chances are, that will be us.

However, if we discriminate and let go, the emotions we feel leave us and return to their source — the believer.  If we stay in our True Self, said believer must deal with their own emotions.  If we’re wise, we give them what they fear most — unconditional love.  Pure love dissolves anything false.  It’s the most powerful weapon in the universe.  I never attack a believer; but if they attack me, I shoot them with love.  They hate it.

 

What if We Can’t Let Go?

There’s no belief you can’t let go.  However, letting go often takes time.  What if you’re in an urgent situation, like a health crisis?  You can feel lost between two worlds.  The best and safest thing to do is to honestly admit that you don’t believe you can let go right now; follow your beliefs to the letter.  Do whatever you believe will result in healing the effects.  After the crisis is over, let go around that subject until you release the causal belief.  Regardless of what you’re told by experts, the problem will disappear and not return when you no longer hold the causal belief in mind.

My biggest surprise around letting go, and what comes as a shock to people I mentor, is that any situation that we didn’t fix at the cause earlier in life will come up again in initiation.  If we had a physical problem earlier in life, it’s wise to look at the beliefs that caused that problem while our health is still good and our mind clear.  If we had relationship problems that we fixed with therapy or boundaries, get ready!  People often get upset when they regain the weight they once lost through dieting and exercise.  They fixed the effect, not the cause.  We’ll probably meet these problems again, but now we’ll know how to let go.  This time, we’ll remove the cause.

 

Can I keep my religion?

Of course. You won’t be completely free, but you can keep it.  I recommend that anyone with a tradition, practice, or religion, which they believe they want to keep, should live it fully, honestly, and completely.  Do it exactly as prescribed.  Don’t cheat.  In that way, you’ll see it for what it is.

When you practice a tradition, practice, or religion selectively, you’re not really following the tradition.  You pick up all of the beliefs of that tradition, yet don’t follow the protocol — that’s dangerous.  Many people make up their own rebellious rules or beliefs — not realizing that their modifications have no power against the fundamentalists’ beliefs.

If you live any belief system fully without cheating and still like it, then keep it.  But don’t become a zealot.  Even if it works for you, it’s still a belief system; it’s unfair to force others to accept your beliefs.

 

Challenging Beliefs

Many of us were taught to never challenge another person’s beliefs.  It’s certainly not good to argue over beliefs since we get the cooties of the person we argue with.  But we must challenge the beliefs within our own minds.

If another person has beliefs, and they’re happy with them, then I just make sure that I don’t believe them and infect my mind.  However, if they ask me to listen to their problems, to help them fix their problems, or to take care of them in some way, then that’s a request for help.  I give them support by helping them find their causal belief and let that belief go.  I’m not a caretaker.  If they don’t want their belief challenged, then they can fix their own problem.  I won’t fix their effects.  Jesus demonstrated this by “letting the dead bury the dead.”  In other words, those in the illusion can take care of the illusion’s problems.

Generally, I’ll only help another clean up their mess if they let go since I know the problem won’t happen again.  When people are forced to take responsibility for the effects of their beliefs, they often choose to let go.  My methods sound cruel to some, but they’re not.  In my experience, when I hold people to the truth, they often rise to the occasion.  When I rescue someone who’s drowning, I usually drown with them.

The True Self is Simple; Complexity is False but Interesting

Truth versus Lies (Beliefs)

By Cathy Eck

You Don’t Need to Learn the Truth,

You Only Need to Let Go of What Hides It

When I was in business nearly every day someone yelled, “KISS” (keep it simple stupid).  People in intellect-driven fields, like accounting and technology, often make something really simple into something very complex.  Complexity costs money.  Often it’s born from someone trying to prove their personal superiority at the expense of the team or company.

Those who could keep it simple were valuable.  They could move a team of diverse people though a project and get it done without problems.

 

Preachers and Teachers

I’m often reminded of this when I listen to intellectuals explain their view of consciousness.  They see sacred geometry, worm holes, and parallel universes.  It’s cool, and I love to read about their perspective.  I enjoy their lectures and love that they shared them with me.  But I see it as their perspective.

At one time, I’d accept other’s perspectives as THE truth, often because they were convinced that their perspective was the absolute truth.  I’d stuff their perspective into my already cluttered mind.  Later, I realized that their perspective wasn’t completely true.  Often cognitive dissonance traversed their broad canyons.  Most perspectives are a blend of true and false — that’s human perception.

Right-brained people see divine images of Gods and Goddesses or the cosmos; they hear channeled beings.  That’s all cool too; and it produces amazing art and stories.  But once again, if we turn it into THE truth versus their truth, we create confusion.  The truth that we all share, uniquely expressed, plus our beliefs create our life perspective (our reality).  I don’t dislike beliefs.  But, I abhor when someone makes their beliefs the truth.  That causes every problem in the world; it keeps people in prisons of misery.

 

KISS Equals Freedom

I learned from my business years.  I keep my ideals for this website lean and simple.  When our intellect isn’t engaged, letting go is easier.

First, I want everyone to have the ability to find their truth, their wisdom, and their creative genius inside.  That’s a human right.

Second, I want to expose beliefs that people have sold as the truth so that they no longer hurt people.

Third, I want to empower people to “JUST SAY NO” to other people’s beliefs if they don’t enhance their life.  I want people to know they can let go and how to do it.  That way, if they want to, they can clean up their mind and live their perfect life.

 

Simple Works

I offer simple analogies and techniques because when you tear open the mind, you find that it’s simple.  Learning and memorizing made our minds so damn complex.  If we feel emotion when we think something, it’s false.  How can anything be more simple than that?  It’s the false mind that added masculine/feminine, projection, and psychological reversal so that we’d get confused about what is true and what is false.  It’s the false mind that said that beliefs are true even though they feel bad.  When we add complexity to our mind by filling it with beliefs, we make ourselves rigid and ordinary.  We cover up our True Self.  Complexity breeds problems and then solves those same problems.

The processes that I suggest are simple, but don’t discount them.   We’re often afraid to let go of our knowledge because we think we’ll become grunting cavemen.  But that hasn’t been my experience at all.  Our false mind tells us that it’s giving us what can only come from our True Self.  Our false mind lies because it’s afraid of dying or being exposed.

 

Which is more beautiful?

Looking at a rose or reading the biological description of one.

Which is more loving?

Holding the person you love or studying their biological anatomy.

Which is more real?

The Army’s beliefs and emotions or the number of people and date that he killed them.

When we intellectualize something, we move away from the essence of it.  We become incapable of true love or being our authentic Selves.  Hurting others becomes easy.

That’s what society has done.  It’s tried to explain everything with logic.  In doing so, it has lost the simplicity, the beauty, and the love that’s natural.  We don’t need to know every line in a play; we just need to know our part.  But we’ll think we need to know and control everything if we can’t trust the other people on the stage.  We’ve become more knowledgeable and less trusting because knowledge can’t be trusted; it isn’t wisdom.

Knowledge is becoming worthless as it should be.  We’re living at a time when we can let computers store the facts and data, while we focus on being ourselves, being creators and innovators, or being true lovers.  People go to workshop after workshop to learn what’s true when they have a perfect discrimination system inside that they don’t use.  There are classes on how to hook our soul mate, but why?  If the soul has a mate, can’t it find the damn thing?   We see our True Self as weak.  Thanks religion.  We must realize how stupid we’ve become since we’ve accepted knowledge and let it go.

The intellect isn’t bad.  I’m still an intellectual person, but I know when to pull on the reigns and stop the horse from going the wrong way.  When a belief is hurting myself or another, I let it go.  When a belief has to be held together with duct tape to work, I let it go.  When a belief keeps me from a dream that feels peaceful and calm and right, I let it go.  When another demands me to think like them, I let them go.  It really is simple.

Beliefs can be fun and creative so long as we never forget that no matter how cool beliefs might be, they aren’t true.  And if they no longer serve our needs, we can let them go.

The Awkward Phase On the Path To Freedom

Awkward Phase

 By Cathy Eck

 

Awkward Phase

When I was little, I’d often find myself caught in some stupid habit or pattern of thought.  My mother would say, “Ah, don’t worry about it.  It’s just an awkward phase.”  What might have become an obstruction to my freedom, like OCD or a serious addiction, left about as easily as it came.

Those are great words to remember on the quest for freedom because it often seems like one big awkward phase.  The reason for this is that when you start to choose freedom (the True Self), the remnants of your false self show up so that you can let them go.  But often they look very real, important, and true.  Usually they involve others.  Let’s look at some areas where awkwardness shows up on freedom road.

 

Traditions

Let’s pretend that your family had a tradition of Uncle Joe dressing up like Santa and bringing gifts to the children every year.  Now you’re an adult; you’ve not believed in Santa for a long time.  All the kids are gone, but Uncle Joe still dresses up.  It no longer makes sense. It’s awkward.

But even worse, now that you’ve decided to live from your True Self, you find that you can’t lie anymore.  Lying obstructs our freedom; it feels bad — yes, even so-called white lies.  Uncle Joe isn’t Santa.  The tradition that once looked fun now looks abominable.

In time, every tradition looks wrong from the eyes of the True Self.  Traditions are just beliefs on a schedule.  Traditions serve the false self.

So you’re in a quandary.  You don’t want to ruin what others think is fun; but to pretend Uncle Joe is Santa, you have to honor beliefs that now look ridiculous.  Awkward!

 

Love, Heroes, and Care Takers

People who live with both feet planted in the illusion love heroes and often shine way too brightly in a crisis.  For twelve years, I lived in a rural Virginia town and never saw an auto accident; my friend saw them all the time.  She loved getting in there to help.  I started to wonder if she was helping or causing the accidents.

Love is defined in the illusion as rescuing people from their problems, honoring that they’re victims with no responsibility, and care taking or serving without whining.  Now do a 180 and head for freedom, and you realize that all suffering is the product of the beliefs we’ve borrowed.  You can’t bear to watch someone suffer, victimhood looks like a jail cell, and you abhor problems.  But what do you do with the problem lovers and victims in your life?  Awkward!

Then there is the flip side where you mess up and create some crap in your life.  You know you’re responsible, and you just want time alone to work it out and clear your mind.  But friends and family all want to help you.  They start to feel sorry for you, and you want to kill them.  Very awkward!

 

Intentions

The illusion is all about what you do and what is right and wrong according to the illusory rulebook you’ve chosen to follow.  Now you board the freedom train, and you recognize that intention is what really matters.  Your friend is whining about her bad child for the tenth time this week.  But you can see the truth.  Her story is contributing to her child’s behavior.  Social conventions say a friend is a good listener.  But you want your friend to have a great relationship with her child so you suggest that she drop her story.  Your friend gets very mad and says you’re rude.

Now who is really the rude one?  Is it more rude to bombard your friends with all your problems and victim stories; or is it more rude to say, “I think  you’d be better off if you dropped that story?”  Awkward!

Then there is the flip side where your friends are all talking about American heroes, war, their beloved political party, and pride in America.  They’re funneling tons of fuel into the illusion, and you say nothing.  They call you unpatriotic and say you don’t care about your country.  But you understand that they’re contributing to more war and problems for the country.  You don’t want to contribute to that.  So you look bad again.  Awkward!

 

Emotions

You work very hard on your mind and more and more you realize that if you are thinking something that generates emotion, it isn’t true.  So when your family or friends piss you off, you go to work on yourself.  They start to think they’re perfect.  They never cause a problem anymore.

But then you do something that causes them emotion, and they blame it on you.  They still think that others cause their emotions, and they have no intention of letting what they see in you go.   Even worse, most of the time you didn’t do what they thought you did.  They just caught a glimpse of their own reflection.  Now just try to explain that you didn’t do what they’re sure you did.  Super awkward!

 

The Cause

None of these situations are fun.  In fact, they often make you feel like moving to a remote deserted island.  You feel like the world is just too crazy to live in.

What causes these awkward moments is that in the illusion, we’re trained to see though the eyes of other people or other beings like the old-man-in-the-sky God.  When we move toward freedom, we start to see the world through clear eyes.  However, we still remember how others saw us before.  We’re meeting the past moments that caused us to adopt someone else’s rulebook and abandon our True Self.  Old fear arises that we’ll be judged, humiliated, or punished.  But that can’t happen if we just remember to let go.

What looks like an awkward moment really is one more opportunity to gain freedom.  As long as we remember to let go, it really is just a phase.