Understanding Conspiracy Theory in the Illusion

Hero in an illusion

By Cathy Eck

 

Illusion Traps

I write this blog to expose the mental traps of the illusion.  I know them because I got caught in them myself and found the way out.  We’re all innocent victims of an illusion that was created a long time ago.  Jesus said that his perpetrators didn’t know what they were doing.  He was right.  They were playing their role in the illusion.

Conspiracy theorists do the same thing that I do — they expose.  But they’re not changing anything because they’re making a big mistake.

Conspiracy theorists focus on action.  They generate emotions in their listeners.  But they don’t resolve those emotions.  So they commit the same error as religion.  They make us afraid of the little man behind the curtain by convincing us that he has power.  That’s their error.  False beliefs have no power.  

Exposure is necessary.  We must first see a belief before we can let it go.  The conspiracy theorist is telling us someone else’s imaginary story.  But sadly, they make the story more real.  We should treat anyone’s illusory story like we treat a movie, but we don’t.  We fight their war or support their programs.  We take sides when neither side is worth taking.  We go into fear, panic, and terror.  We become even more obedient.  Conspiracy theory makes us believe the illusion more — not less.

When we believe another person’s illusion, whether it’s a religious, political, or even family illusion, we become blind and stupid.  Our intellect loves reasons and explanations.  Conspiracy theorists provide seemingly logical reasons for things that feel bad.  Religions have offered the same useless service.  But neither expose or fix the MENTAL cause of our problems.  An illusion, like a movie, can’t harm us unless we believe it.  We don’t need any more people who convince us that something false is true.

The first person to unconditionally love their opponent will always win.  True trumps false every time.  It’s hard to get to unconditional love when you’re being flooded with information about how despicable someone is.

 

An Example

Probably the biggest conspiracy is the evil illuminati.  People say there’s a secret group controlling the world.  Illusory games are about getting the most people to give their creative power away to a belief system.  In good and evil, people give their power to the minions of the old man in the sky.  In win-lose, they give it to the illuminati  — or some other little-man brotherhood.  The religious hate the brotherhoods and vice versa because they’re battling for the same minds.

We give our mind to leaders by believing they have power or authority.  We give our mind to them by accepting their beliefs as true.  We give our mind to them by giving our money to their programs, fighting their battles, and retelling their history.  The false Gods don’t care if we love them or hate them.  They only care that we believe them.

Conspiracy and religion both focus on actions — what someone did.  To get to the True Self, we must clear beliefs and ignore actions.

Our mind falsely tells us that the effects prove the beliefs are true when they’re actually proof that we believed the system was the truth.

Conspiracy and religion are on opposing sides of the same illusion, that’s why religious people go crazy over conspiracy.

If we play a role in an illusion, we’re an actor.  We can only be a true hero when we discover and live from our True Self.

 

The Illusion of Goodness

As our minds have evolved, people have learned to project both sides of duality outside while standing comfortably in the false center looking like a God.  The false center looks balanced and good.  Barack Obama is playing this role now.  He doesn’t know why the democrats and republicans can’t just get along.  Both sides are the reflection of his own split mind; but no one, including Obama, realizes that.  He thinks he’s a victim.

George Bush projected his inner terrorist (evil doers) outside of him while he watched 9/11 in a completely nonplussed state.  He was the good guy — whole and complete.  His shadow was attacking his own people.  He wasn’t concerned that people were dying in his illusion.  He was watching his illusion play out on the big screen of life, and he was the good guy — the hero and God.

Conspiracy theorists went wild after 9/11 because they wanted to know the cause.  The cause was George Bush’s Fundamentalist Christian belief in evil.  The conspiracy theorists were too busy looking at actions to see the mental cause.  No one said, “Hey let’s drop the belief in terrorism.  It’s a lie.”  When we think of terrorism, it feels terrible because it’s false.  Evil is always a FALSE projection. But George Bush is an authority; and when an authority says “Be afraid,” the sheep obey.

Conspiracy theorists tried to fix the situation.  They said, “Hey the enemy is in America.”  On the mental level, they were right.  George Bush was the leader of America; and he believed in terrorism.  So technically the cause was in America.  But the cause wasn’t in his physical actions, it was in his mind.

 

The Answer

We need to go back to the way our emotions were designed.  When we feel emotions, we stop.  We look at what we’re thinking or hearing in that moment.  We realize it’s false, and we let it go even if everyone in the whole world believes it.  Conspiracy theorists expose the hiding place of lies.  If we let those lies go, they lose power quickly.  If we can unconditionally love the liars, the little men quickly drop off their big high pedestals.

When we let go, we no longer remain caught in the stories of others.  We stop playing roles in other people’s illusions.  We take back our power as the directors, writers, and actors in our own story; we’re free.

 

 

 

New Age, Self-Help, and Conspiracy Theory

Exposing Beliefs and Conspiracy Theory

By Cathy Eck

 

I spent this past weekend with a small group of amazing women who are totally committed to freedom.  They all displayed the kind of courage, radical honesty, and willingness to let go that really does change the world.

Each of these women had done their fair share of time in the New Age movement, dabbled in self-help, and even tasted the bitterness of religion.  The acceptance of New Age and self-help techniques seemed to repair the damage caused by religion.  It allowed them to feel balanced, but not free.  So we took a good hard look at how opposing belief systems keep us stuck.

 

His Story in My Life

I used to own a big private library.  I acquired my first self-help book about a year after I married a Catholic Italian.  Not having any strong beliefs myself, I saw beliefs as personal and not really that important.  I certainly wasn’t going to allow beliefs to get in the way of love.  But people with beliefs feel bonded with like-minded people; so I felt pressured to honor my husband’s beliefs.  I presumed that I was just keeping peace by giving in.  However, I was slowly giving his beliefs power in my own mind.  I was developing a yin for his yang false self.

With each Catholic and cultural belief that I honored, I acquired another self-help book.  I balanced his religious and cultural beliefs with other beliefs that appeared to neutralize the charges.  I accepted the self-help author’s projection of their beliefs because it felt like I was fixing my mind; but I was just putting more garbage into it. You can’t fix beliefs with more beliefs. Two wrongs don’t make things right; they make us stuck.

If I was positive, I wasn’t humble, obedient, and good.  I’d try to convince my husband that he was wrong.  But that didn’t work, so I’d obey his false god for awhile.  But then I wasn’t positive.  My mind was a fucking mess.

Everything that I write about on this site and Gateway To Gold were born out of my intense desire to free my mind.  I didn’t want balance — I wanted freedom.  I decided I would either get completely free or die.  But I would not create another false belief system to fix the false beliefs I had accepted. That meant that I had to discover how to let go.

 

How It Works

Any concept in the illusion has two sides; the True Self doesn’t have an opposite.  The New Age and self-help movements copied a very old trick invented by religion.  They take something from the bottom of the triangle and move it to the top (see above).  Now the True Self must move to the bottom.  What used to be true is now dual and false.

The triangle process will always get us to the truth.  If you want unconditional love.  You must see that our society put romance, caretaking, or two halves of a whole at the top of the triangle so that we’ll strive for that.  They define love by what you do.  Then they put hate and unconditional love at the bottom.  I can’t tell you how many times I’ve truly loved someone unconditionally, and they thought I was hating them because I wasn’t agreeing with them or I didn’t do what they considered love.  They couldn’t feel my real love because they were looking for a gift, words that supported their false self, an action, or sex.

 

Conspiracy Theory

Conspiracy theory exposes this shift in the triangle.  People who detect conspiracy usually have a good sense of smelling the false.  But they go too far.  They turn what they see into a purposeful conspiracy.  In truth, people have no idea what they’re projecting because they’ve accepted the false triangle as the truth.  When we’re lost in the illusion, we always project an enemy.  We always think we’re good or right when we’re actually false.

Look at 9/11.  This was clearly George Bush’s projection.  He’s an Evangelical Christian who believes with all of his little pointy heart in good and evil.  He also sees himself as good, and his definition of good lives at the top of his Evangelical triangle.  His false God and his evil doers live at the bottom of his illusory triangle.  Evil shows up for him in the place where he isn’t winning — oil.

This was only his illusion, but he was the leader.  Our problem began when we believed his illusion.  Before every conspiracy type of event, there’s a grooming period where the authority sells their beliefs, usually with fear.  Once enough people accept the beliefs, the event occurs because we manifest it.  Everyone involved in 9/11 had the same false view of the world — it can’t be any other way.  The way to avoid these situations is to stop believing illusions, even if they come from authority.  We must remember how to discriminate between true and false.

The conspiracy theorists said 9/11 wasn’t real.  It was reality but not truth; it could only happen in the illusion.  Nothing in the illusion is true; it’s only the projection of a leader’s own enemy.

Conspiracy theory solidifies the illusion if we think we have to fix it, fight it, or if we think it was purposeful.  Once the conspiracy theorist exposes the illusion, their work is done.  If we let go, the leader’s projection boomerangs back to them.  We don’t have to do a thing.

We can look cold-hearted when we don’t empathize with people caught in illusory tragedy; we can look unsupportive if we don’t believe the latest self-help/New Age scheme.  But what we don’t let go will continue to manifest.  Balancing belief systems does no good.  In fact, the self-help/New Age movement created more chaos, more conspiracy, as people projected their evil and negativity on to others under the guise of spirituality.  We’ve tried it all, and it hasn’t made the world any better; now we must let it all go.