Turning False Good into True Good

True good versus false good

By Cathy Eck

 

False Good or True Good

False goodness is a big trap on the road to freedom.   What people consider good according to social standards isn’t real goodness because it has an opposite.  It’s based on blindly following social rules.  Consequently, many people look good when they aren’t good; often those that look bad are much closer to their True Self.   We see and hear what’s on the surface; we feel what’s hidden underneath.  False goodness should always produce emotions.  It’s our signal that what we’re hearing or seeing is false.

Many leaders, marketers, preachers, gurus, teachers, and inspirational speakers know the power of the false good mask.  You might even have friends or family who have a good mask.  You actually do them and yourself a favor when you stop falling for their act.  But often we fear what lies below the mask, so we refrain from exposing their shadow.  In my experience, people usually treat false good people much better than they treat those who are truly good because they’re afraid of the masters of the false good mask.  Most people have a deep fear of good people that they ignore because it makes no sense.

If we’re truly observant, we’ll see that what society labels good is the removal or fixing of emotions, which we think happens by fixing the problems (effects).  Mom feels lonely, so we go visit her.  Our boss is worried about our low numbers, so we work harder.  We’re taught that emotions are bad.  If we eliminate another’s emotions, we’re good.

But that’s the giant error of the illusion.  Emotions are the messenger that points to wrong thinking (beliefs).  We’re trained to shoot the messenger and ignore the causal beliefs.  Fixing mom’s loneliness or our boss’s worries isn’t our problem.  We aren’t the cause of their emotions; their beliefs are.

 

An Example

Our friend, Jane, feels ugly.  She’s put on twenty pounds since her divorce.  Stress lines cause her to look older.  She believes no one will love her again.

Sally is her friend.  Sally listens to Jane and sympathizes with her.   Jane likes the attention of Sally’s sympathy.  So they bond over Jane’s problem.  Sally has been trained to be nice so she says, “Jane, you don’t look bad.  What’s not to love about you? You’ll find love again.”  She tells Jane what Jane wants to hear.  She might also give Jane some beauty tips.  Or perhaps she offers to do a makeover for her.  Sally appears good because she temporarily removed Jane’s emotions.

Sally’s behavior is socially correct.  But she doesn’t help Jane one bit.  In order for Sally to inspire or fix Jane’s emotions, Sally has to hold Jane’s problems and beliefs in her mind as true.  She’s actually feeding Jane’s false self while appearing to be good, nice, and supportive.   If she gives Jane advice, she’s feeding Jane more beliefs.  Likewise, giving Jane a makeover will cause Jane to feel good for a day or two, but it won’t cure Jane’s false belief that she’s ugly.  Only letting go of the false causal belief will cure Jane.  Then she won’t need Sally to inspire her or help her feel good.  And therein lies the problem.  When we fix the causal belief, we don’t need others.  Codependence disappears.  We’ve got no one to serve.

Sally has been trained that to be kind and to serve is good and righteous.  She feels good when she fixes Jane’s problem or offers advice because she tells herself that she made Jane happy.  She didn’t make Jane happy.  In truth, Sally covered up Jane’s emotional indicator.  She helped her to look away from the cause so now it’s unlikely that the problem will ever go away.

Of course, Sally does wish Jane well.  She did what she was trained to do; she was taught that good people inspire and serve others.  Real service and true good eventually puts the server out of a job.

When we open our eyes, we realize that what society labels good is actually harmful.

This understanding cures us of self-help gurus and expensive experts.  It isn’t anyone’s job to inspire or fix even one other.  But we can all help others to find their own inspiration and wisdom by pushing them to let go of their causal beliefs and by letting go of the beliefs we hold in our mind about them.

 

The Escape

More people are trapped by good than bad.   If we’ve gotten stuck in someone’s heroic mission, bought into their get-rich-quick scheme, or play the black sheep in our family, we have to find the beliefs in us that keep us stuck in their illusion.  We probably won’t convince the person with the good mask to free us.  Ask yourself: “What you think you need or want?  What are you hoping to fix?  What emotions are you trying to get rid of?  What do you think they can do that you can’t?”

If we fall for get-rich-quick schemes, we have a belief in lack.  If we’re desperate for a teacher or healer, spent lots of money on the psychic hotline, or have an addiction to self-help books, we believe that we don’t know the answer or can’t heal ourselves.  If we hold on to family or friends that mistreat us, we fear being alone.  Hidden beliefs are wrapped in emotions so it’s never comfortable to dive into them.  But when we see the beliefs and let them go, we’ve eliminated the cause.  We no longer need the product or service.  The solution will actually look worthless because it is.

We’re often labeled rude or uncaring when we stop blindly obeying the socially-defined good rules.  Those who win with the social system, have to make us wrong to keep themselves right.  But when we heal this confusion within ourselves, we become truly good and authentic — our own false good mask disappears.  Then we never fall for the illusion’s goodness trick again.

New Age, Self-Help, and Conspiracy Theory

Exposing Beliefs and Conspiracy Theory

By Cathy Eck

 

I spent this past weekend with a small group of amazing women who are totally committed to freedom.  They all displayed the kind of courage, radical honesty, and willingness to let go that really does change the world.

Each of these women had done their fair share of time in the New Age movement, dabbled in self-help, and even tasted the bitterness of religion.  The acceptance of New Age and self-help techniques seemed to repair the damage caused by religion.  It allowed them to feel balanced, but not free.  So we took a good hard look at how opposing belief systems keep us stuck.

 

His Story in My Life

I used to own a big private library.  I acquired my first self-help book about a year after I married a Catholic Italian.  Not having any strong beliefs myself, I saw beliefs as personal and not really that important.  I certainly wasn’t going to allow beliefs to get in the way of love.  But people with beliefs feel bonded with like-minded people; so I felt pressured to honor my husband’s beliefs.  I presumed that I was just keeping peace by giving in.  However, I was slowly giving his beliefs power in my own mind.  I was developing a yin for his yang false self.

With each Catholic and cultural belief that I honored, I acquired another self-help book.  I balanced his religious and cultural beliefs with other beliefs that appeared to neutralize the charges.  I accepted the self-help author’s projection of their beliefs because it felt like I was fixing my mind; but I was just putting more garbage into it. You can’t fix beliefs with more beliefs. Two wrongs don’t make things right; they make us stuck.

If I was positive, I wasn’t humble, obedient, and good.  I’d try to convince my husband that he was wrong.  But that didn’t work, so I’d obey his false god for awhile.  But then I wasn’t positive.  My mind was a fucking mess.

Everything that I write about on this site and Gateway To Gold were born out of my intense desire to free my mind.  I didn’t want balance — I wanted freedom.  I decided I would either get completely free or die.  But I would not create another false belief system to fix the false beliefs I had accepted. That meant that I had to discover how to let go.

 

How It Works

Any concept in the illusion has two sides; the True Self doesn’t have an opposite.  The New Age and self-help movements copied a very old trick invented by religion.  They take something from the bottom of the triangle and move it to the top (see above).  Now the True Self must move to the bottom.  What used to be true is now dual and false.

The triangle process will always get us to the truth.  If you want unconditional love.  You must see that our society put romance, caretaking, or two halves of a whole at the top of the triangle so that we’ll strive for that.  They define love by what you do.  Then they put hate and unconditional love at the bottom.  I can’t tell you how many times I’ve truly loved someone unconditionally, and they thought I was hating them because I wasn’t agreeing with them or I didn’t do what they considered love.  They couldn’t feel my real love because they were looking for a gift, words that supported their false self, an action, or sex.

 

Conspiracy Theory

Conspiracy theory exposes this shift in the triangle.  People who detect conspiracy usually have a good sense of smelling the false.  But they go too far.  They turn what they see into a purposeful conspiracy.  In truth, people have no idea what they’re projecting because they’ve accepted the false triangle as the truth.  When we’re lost in the illusion, we always project an enemy.  We always think we’re good or right when we’re actually false.

Look at 9/11.  This was clearly George Bush’s projection.  He’s an Evangelical Christian who believes with all of his little pointy heart in good and evil.  He also sees himself as good, and his definition of good lives at the top of his Evangelical triangle.  His false God and his evil doers live at the bottom of his illusory triangle.  Evil shows up for him in the place where he isn’t winning — oil.

This was only his illusion, but he was the leader.  Our problem began when we believed his illusion.  Before every conspiracy type of event, there’s a grooming period where the authority sells their beliefs, usually with fear.  Once enough people accept the beliefs, the event occurs because we manifest it.  Everyone involved in 9/11 had the same false view of the world — it can’t be any other way.  The way to avoid these situations is to stop believing illusions, even if they come from authority.  We must remember how to discriminate between true and false.

The conspiracy theorists said 9/11 wasn’t real.  It was reality but not truth; it could only happen in the illusion.  Nothing in the illusion is true; it’s only the projection of a leader’s own enemy.

Conspiracy theory solidifies the illusion if we think we have to fix it, fight it, or if we think it was purposeful.  Once the conspiracy theorist exposes the illusion, their work is done.  If we let go, the leader’s projection boomerangs back to them.  We don’t have to do a thing.

We can look cold-hearted when we don’t empathize with people caught in illusory tragedy; we can look unsupportive if we don’t believe the latest self-help/New Age scheme.  But what we don’t let go will continue to manifest.  Balancing belief systems does no good.  In fact, the self-help/New Age movement created more chaos, more conspiracy, as people projected their evil and negativity on to others under the guise of spirituality.  We’ve tried it all, and it hasn’t made the world any better; now we must let it all go.

Bridging the True and False Worlds by Letting Go

The Bridge

By Cathy Eck

 

The Bridge

To get from one side of the river to the other, we need a bridge. Likewise, to get from one side of perception to the other side, we need a bridge.  In any aspect of our lives, we can see the true world in the distance — no rules, no problems, no disease, creativity, joy, and freedom.  Then we have our current reality that was created by our beliefs.  When we get honest about where we are and where we know we belong, a bridge of pure thought appears.

Most people believe that crossing a bridge requires thinking of the destination or creating a plan.  They visualize, affirm, and effort hoping to drag their asses across the bridge.  They fight their current reality, created by their long-standing beliefs. Letting go of our beliefs seems counterintuitive because we think we have to create a thought bridge when we only have to reveal the bridge that already exists.

People step on bridges all the time.  Someone gets a great idea for the design of a new house. They step on the bridge.  Then they look at their bank account. They think about all the stuff they’d have to move.  They realize it will be difficult to find the beautiful piece of land that they saw in their vision.  So they step back down off the bridge and tell themselves to be happy with what they’ve got.

Normal thinking causes us to either turn away from true desires or to will them into submission with great effort.  If we want to get across the bridge effortlessly, we must learn the art of letting go.

 

Don’t Look Back

A great story about crossing the bridge to our True Self is Lot’s Wife leaving Sodom and Gomorrah.  She’s told by God to not look back.  This is good advice if you understand it.  She’s supposedly leaving her sin behind.  We usually associate sin with bad deeds; but in the ancient world sin meant wrong thinking or missing the mark.  Sinful or wrongful thinking causes you to miss your target destination.

Let’s return to our dream home example.  The dreamer sees the image of the home vividly in mind.  If it’s a True Self vision, it will feel great.  But they won’t be thinking about looking good or throwing wild parties to impress their friends.  They won’t feel excited; the vision will feel peaceful and right.

They step on the bridge to their new home.  Crossing the bridge isn’t about doing; the bridge is made of pure thought.  As they step on the bridge, thoughts arise from their false self that tempt them to look back or run back.  When those thoughts arise, they should feel very bad.  The emotions are telling them that their thoughts (or sin) are keeping them from crossing the bridge.  So they must let them go.

Our false self doesn’t want us letting go.  It tries to hold us back.  So it projects our beliefs on to others to confuse us and cause us to hold on.

So friends tell our dreamer that their home idea is too expensive.  The dreamer reads a special report on why people should never build a home exactly like the one they envisioned.  They think, “Oh my God, that is a sign,” and start to look back.  Fortunately they remember the art of letting go.  The next day the special report is exposed as fraudulent.  Their children hate the idea.  Do they turn back?  Their mother says the dream is a waste of money.  Do they turn back?

Trolls are appearing under their bridge and building a toll booth. Their false self is working overtime to pull them back.  They get a physical disease.  They lose their job.  This is what a true desire does; it forces us to let go of our beliefs because you enter the kingdom of the True Self naked — meaning no beliefs.

A true desire can’t be fulfilled with a vision board or a shit load of affirmations.  It requires a very sturdy pure thought bridge that is crossed by continuously letting go of the anchors (beliefs) that hold us in the false self’s illusory world.

This is why no one crosses the bridge to the True Self.  It’s the loneliest bridge on earth.  The minute we start that walk, the illusion within our own mind keeps trying to get us to look or turn back.  If we do, we turn to stone, meaning that we can’t reach our destination.  We stay stuck in the illusion.

 

The Game

A healthy way to stay on course is to see crossing the bridge as a game.  First, most games are not a matter of life and death so it lightens our perception.  Second, children love to play games.  Many childhood games are metaphors for getting lost and then finding our way — think “Hide and Seek” or “Pin the Tail on the Donkey.”  When we take crossing the bridge too seriously, it’s painful.  When we make it a matter of life or death, it’s horrific.

The people who want us to stay in the illusion appear to be our dreaded evil enemies.  In the ordinary human mind, difficult or angry people are seen as enemies or pains in the ass.  We fight them and oppose them.  We ignore them and manipulate them.  And we stay stuck in the illusion with them eternally — that is hell.  Remember good and evil are two sides of the same illusion.

If we see them as allies exposing our beliefs, we get across the bridge much faster.  In fact, they’re exactly what we need for success in crossing the bridge because they show we exactly what needs letting go.  They show us our sins, our beliefs.  When we see them as our reflection and refuse to break the mirror by letting go of what we see, our seeming enemies actually push us right across the bridge to freedom.

 

Which One of Us is the Idiot? Resolving Right and Wrong

The best books are those with no beliefs.  The empty book

The Bible is like an empty book. What we see inside is a reflection of our own mind.  If our mind is fixed on right and wrong, that is what we see within its pages.

By Cathy Eck 

 

How Do We Know If We Are the Idiot?

A Facebook post inspired this article.  It points to a mind trap that kept me stuck for years and still trips me up from time to time.  It is easily resolvable once you see the trick.

The post had a photo of a Bible; underneath it were the words:

“I believe everything this book says, and I don’t care if you call me an idiot.”  

Right and Wrong?

Another Face of Good and Evil

This Facebook post reflects the current stance of the Fundamentalist movements today.  They feel that their faith is being challenged by nonbelievers.  They are sure they are right; and everyone who doesn’t think as they do is wrong and abusive.  So many people are realizing that religion has simply not worked.  They are eliminating the middle man and doing their best to live from a place of love.  They label themselves spiritual rather than religious.

When we make that shift, the old status quo comes out spitting.  It is like the bully on the playground who hides the fact that he feels powerless.  The bully’s power rests in getting you to accept his powerlessness by convincing you that you are the bad guy, the misfit, the outcast.  The bully projects their imaginary opponent on to you and hopes you’ll accept their projection.

This is where we get tricked if we aren’t wise to their game.  You see, what this Facebook post really says is, “If you don’t believe as I believe, then you think I’m an idiot.”  She is talking to herself explaining her view of the world to us.

We won’t get sucked in to her perspective if we can see that this is all in her mind.  It has nothing to do with us.  She’s stuck in two minds, but she only identifies with one of those minds, the believer.  She is fighting an imaginary battle of right and wrong with an enemy that she has projected.  Her enemy thinks she’s an idiot.  It also keeps her stuck in her own illusion.

We clearly don’t want to enter her world.  So we have to avoid the temptation to give her what she wants, which is to label her an idiot or get angry at her projection.   If she gets us to go there, she’s got the power.  We prove her illusion right, and we won’t do very well in her world.

 

The Right and Wrong Power Game

This is a frequent power strategy in the illusion.  The winners of the illusion do this masterfully, and they rule the world.  The goal of the false self is to exalt itself within the illusion.  It believes that it is right, and you are wrong.  It is good and you’re evil.  If it can get you into the illusion in this way, it wins and you lose.  Guaranteed!

The first time I saw this was in a Catholic church.  The priest gave a sermon on judgment.  Since I didn’t perceive him as an authority, I could see that he was talking to himself.  The congregation that he pretended to talk to were just his own projection; the people he judged.  But everyone else saw him as an authority so they all believed what he said.  They saw themselves as judgmental and felt bad about themselves after the sermon.  He was reinforcing the belief that the church planted in them long ago, which was that they were sinners.  I didn’t have that planted belief; so he looked like the fraud that he was to me.

I wish I could say that I didn’t fall into the same trap in my life, but my own authorities did the same number on me.  This is how we all fall into the illusion.  But we can dig our way out when we resolve right and wrong within our own minds.

 

Resolving Right and Wrong

Last week I watched a PBS special on Abraham Lincoln.  They said that during the Civil War, Lincoln faced a deep dilemma.  He saw two opposing sides, and both thought that God wanted them to win.  Both saw the other as the evil enemy.  Who was right in God’s eyes?  He struggled and struggled with this moral issue.

This is the dilemma of the world right now.  We all seeing opposing forces everywhere and don’t know which is right and which is wrong.  When everyone looks good, who is telling the truth; who is lying?  Who is good and who is evil?  Who can we trust?  These are questions that have the potential to push us to freedom.

When I heard about this moment in Lincoln’s life, I resonated completely; and I knew how powerful that experience must have been for him.  When we have a moment where two opposing sides both sound plausible, we have our moment where the truth can shine through.  But we must recognize that both sides are false opponents fighting their own inner battles.  The truth has no opponent; you can’t find it in duality.

Lincoln had to step out of religion and politics and get to what mattered, which was freeing the slaves.  For me, freedom is always the key.  Every time this sort of situation comes in my life, my mind, I have to recognize that if I oppose their belief, I’m an idiot in equal measure.  I’m stuck in their right and wrong world.

But if I allow both sides to be wrong (including my side if I’m involved in the conflict), the truth rises right out of the darkness.  It is just like parting the Red Sea.  The conflict disappears and only the truth remains.

 

The triangle process is very helpful in deciphering the truth hidden under right and wrong.