Intention: Win-Win (Compassion) or Win-Lose

Compassion

By Cathy Eck

 

Win-Win

As an entrepreneur, I read lots of business books.  When I finished one, I’d go to Barnes & Noble to get another.  One night, I stopped at B&N to get my latest fix.  I noticed a book on the display that said “Win-Win” on the cover.  I didn’t buy the book or even look inside it.  But I loved the sound of those words — win-win.

I bought another book and left the store.  But I couldn’t get win-win out of my mind.  I thought, “I’m going to start living my life that way.  If something isn’t win-win, I won’t do it.”  I didn’t realize that I’d just opened a gateway to compassion…one of the most important keys to initiation.

The next day, during a restroom break at work, I was washing my hands; and I dripped soap on the sink counter.  Those soap droplets caught my attention.  I wondered if just leaving them on the sink was win-win.  After all, we had a maid.  But then the soap would stay there looking messy until the maid came.  I also sensed an attitude of superiority in me as if I was too important to clean.  That didn’t feel win-win.  How could I possibly be more important than the woman who cleaned this restroom?  It really wasn’t win-win to pass the responsibility for my mess on to the maid even if it was technically her job.

Eventually, I pulled down some paper towel and cleaned up my mess.  But I hadn’t just cleaned the counter.  I’d also cleaned something in my mind.  I realized that when I reached that win-win place of thinking over this stupid little thing, I felt a deep calmness that I’d not felt since childhood.  It was way beyond anything I’d felt with meditation.  Meditating quieted my mind; but I was letting go of my shallow false masculine perspective, which freed my mind.

Back at my desk, I picked up a sales contract.  Suddenly it didn’t look win-win.  I called the potential customer and offered to make changes in his favor.  I wasn’t playing games anymore; I treated him the way I would want to be treated.  Again, I felt that peace.

This experiment started with a physical focus — doing that which was win-win.  But it shifted into something much bigger — letting go of any thought that wasn’t win-win.  That, I’d learn, is the meaning of compassion.  Compassion is what tames the false masculine.

 

Intention

About ten years later, people started to write books on the power of intention.  But there was no compassion in their intention setting.  They were thinking an intention before they did something like “Send me that which is for the highest good.”  It sounded nice, but they were washing their hands of responsibility — letting the universe decide what’s good for them.  Unfortunately, the universe doesn’t act as our fair and just concierge; we get what we believe.  This allowed the person to look compassionate without being compassionate.  Compassion doesn’t happen until we let go of beliefs.  It purifies our mind when we let go of the false masculine’s judgmental win-lose, good-evil, or right-wrong thoughts.

Others set intentions like, “I intend to win this race,”  or “I intend to lose twenty pounds this month.”  They were willing the future into submission for their benefit — another talent of the false masculine.

My intention to live from win-win caused me to go deep into my mind and to question my own thinking.  I was letting go before I even understood letting go.  To really get to win-win on any subject, I had to consider everyone that might be affected by the situation — the true application of the Golden Rule.  Letting go of the false masculine beliefs and judgments transformed my false physically-oriented perspective into the true, pure mental perspective of life.  Of course, when my mind was right, top of the triangle with no opposite thoughts, my behavior followed.  I couldn’t imagine harming another.

 

Compassion

Later, I decided to do my Ph.D. Dissertation on the initiation story of Jesus, and I used this same technique.  Unlike Christians, I didn’t want to copy Jesus’ actions; I wanted to understand, and find in myself, the mind of Jesus.  I’d take a Bible quote that didn’t make sense such as, “The meek shall inherit the earth.”  I started with the win-lose interpretations that I’d been taught:  “You have to be submissive to get to heaven.  You get rewarded for giving others what they want.”  None of the thoughts that popped into my mind felt win-win.  They didn’t produce that calmness or compassion.  So I kept dropping every belief that arose and kept digging for the truth.  You see, the truth wasn’t in some guru or in the ethers for channels to pick up; it was in my mind resting quietly below all of my false knowledge.

After letting go of many thoughts about this quote, I dropped into that now familiar place of win-win.  Jesus was talking about the mental, not the physical.  He was already in that compassionate place when he spoke.  When we let go of our beliefs and knowledge, our mind becomes meek, quiet, and pure.  We can’t imagine fighting or willing in order to get what we want.  And yet, our meek mind is extraordinarily powerful because our mind is so clear and creative.  We easily get whatever we focus our mind on — we inherit the earth.

I repeated this process for thousands of hours until I decoded the path of initiation from the story of Jesus.  He was a compassionate dude; and it wasn’t because of what he did but because of how he thought.  Then I saw it everywhere — initiation was embedded in many ancient myths and legends.  You can’t see it until you get the right perspective.  Real freedom, real peace, and real power are revealed when we exercise compassion and let go until our thinking becomes completely win-win for everyone.  That’s how we bring heaven back to earth.

Buying Freedom or Earning Freedom

Freedom is earned, not bought

By Cathy Eck

 

Most people associate freedom with wealth or power.  There’s good reason for that.  The most joked about interpretation of the Golden Rule in the illusion is:  “Those with the gold make the rules.”

 

Buying Freedom

Recently, I saw a show on the History Channel about Billionaires.  They briefly addressed their mindset.  They said they have serious God complexes, and they believe they’re doing God’s work even if they’re robbing others blind or killing them.  They have a particular view of the world that they believe is true; and that view has them winning and most of us losing.

The show described this condition in several comical ways:  “Billionaires see themselves as the anointed landlords of the earth.  They see themselves as divinely appointed.  The world would stop spinning on its axis if they failed to exist.”

The show explained that billionaires look philanthropic and generous, but they have a motive with every dollar they spend.  Their charity is fixing what is wrong in their perspective of reality.  In other words, they’re fixing their own projection to perfect their OWN illusion.

The show even admitted that billionaires don’t want us vermin around; they’re now looking into a plan to build an exclusive floating island so they won’t belong to any country, won’t pay taxes, and will (in their mind) have achieved ultimate freedom.  But they’re living a lie; that’s not freedom.

 

Gaining Followers

Another illusory way to gain power and rule the world is to gain permanent followers for your perspective.  Religions, cults, and gurus create power for their beliefs through followers.   Luke Rhinehart wrote a book in the 70’s called “the Book of est.”  It described the mindset of est founder and leader, Werner Erhard.  Erhard borrowed ideas from eastern gurus and the infamous cult leader, L. Ron Hubbard.

“The est organization is not democratic (most American business organizations are not) but rather is authoritarian in the way that baffles many and antagonizes others. Warner Erhard expects staff members to be dedicated to serving est–which, because he and est are one and the same, mean serving him. Late in the fourth day of the training, the trainer explains that Werner is in essence a power source serving masses of people, and individual staff members supply Warner with additional power. The power flows up from graduates and staff, through Warner, out into the world. This is a perfectly reasonable way to explain the essentially Eastern phenomenon of a powerful being (usually a guru or spiritual teacher) attracting other powerful beings who nevertheless choose to channel their power through the leader” (Rhinehart, pg. 264-65).  

 

This is the way of the false god.  We’re so used to our reality being this way that we fall for the trick again and again.

Government authority uses a similar trick.  We send our power up to them believing they’ll take care of us.  People today are noticing that they aren’t doing a very good job of taking care of anyone but themselves.

Notice the flow of energy goes from the followers to the leaders.  This screams false leader; he will assure you that he has your back.  But the true leader operates from unconditional love; his/her energy flows like the sun to those below them in feminine roles.  True leaders constantly examine their projections and correct their own minds.  Lao Tzu said it best, A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: we did it ourselves.”

 

Earned Freedom

The freedom that we gain from letting go is earned freedom; it’s real and indestructible.  Just as it takes time and effort to become a billionaire or grow millions of followers, letting go takes time and effort.  But here’s the difference.  The billionaire and the cult leader must retain their superior masculine position.  They must constantly lobby for top dog if they want their beliefs and rules to control everyone’s experience.  They consciously or unconsciously realize that they have no power in the feminine role.  They’ll do whatever it takes to stay in the masculine role — steal, kill, torture, silence.  They’re doing the “false god’s” work.

Letting go moves us into the realm of the True Self, beyond roles, which is ultimately more powerful than any religious leader, guru, government official, or billionaire.  We really do control our life because their beliefs aren’t in our mind anymore.   We can’t experience what we don’t believe.  The false gods aren’t our enemies; they’re powerless.  They’re own false self is the vermin they want to eliminate.

If we don’t let go of their rules and beliefs in our mind, we’ll fall under their control.  This is why we’ve had great men and women who took risks, but ended up in prison or dead.  They believed they were fighting a real enemy instead of a cartoon.  The movie, “Divergent,” has some great visuals of the power of knowing something isn’t true.  Readers of my blog tend to recognize their “divergent” True Self,  which the movie defines as a mind beyond control.  Divergence requires persistent letting go.  As we conquer this aspect of our false mind, we won’t fear stepping out and speaking the truth anymore.

When we understand true freedom, we understand why it’s worth pursuing, and why it’s completely fair.  The wealthy person and the religious leader or guru are also bound by their own version of the false God.  By letting go, we move beyond their false illusion into real freedom, a place with no boundaries — the realm of our True Selves.

The best indicator of true freedom is that people work together and harmonize.  They don’t play status games.  Everyone is unique, valuable, and worthy.  In true freedom, people aren’t afraid of each other; they don’t harm others.  They’re too busy creating.  And while the billionaire and the guru do get to do what they want, they still fear the vermin outside the commune or mansion (their projections).  Their freedom is an illusion.