God’s Slave and Religious Extremism Exposed

God's Slave

By Cathy Eck

 

God’s Slave

I recently saw a phenomenal movie at the San Diego Jewish Film Festival called “God’s Slave.”  I doubt that it will ever get wide distribution so my commentary is going to include a spoiler alert.  It wouldn’t have ruined it for me to know the entire true story.

It seemed like a crazy coincidence to see this movie just after my father sent me some Republican propaganda, which of course explained how Muslims deserve to be hated and feared.  The writer was clearly caught in his extreme fear of terrorism.  I told my dad that I neither hated nor feared Muslims.  The discussion ended at that point.

 

Hate and Fear

Hating and fearing others actually perpetuates the illusion.  This is why Jesus said not to judge others and to love your enemy.  It’s not spiritual advice.  It’s practical.

Our false mind tells us that hating, judging, fighting, or criticizing our enemy will somehow make things right.  But that doesn’t work and never has.  When we hate or judge someone, we’re in our false masculine mind focusing on our own projection.  When we love our enemy or let go of our beliefs about our projection, it disappears.  Love and truth are the most perfect healing forces, they dissolve what’s false and leave what’s true.  You can never go wrong with unconditional love.

Fear of the false God made him into the illusion’s superstar.  Fear generates emotion; the illusion feeds off of emotion.  When people stop fearing God or fighting over who’s God is the real God, the whole thought form will dissolve.

My dad’s ridiculous email started off with a very strange line.  It said, “Muslims believe Allah, a moon God.”  Now I don’t know if Allah was originally a moon god or not, and it’s not important.  The person writing the email was Christian; Christians have a fake God too, but they think their God is true.  Jesus was considered a Sun God.  Yahweh was most likely a sky/storm God.  But calling Allah a “moon” God got me thinking.  The Muslim religion is a religion of submission — that’s a feminine quality, like the moon.  If we hate and fear anything in the feminine role, we get fear and hate back.  The feminine is reflective, like a mirror.  So how can you blame the feminine?   You can’t.  What this Christian email writer was saying, without realizing it, was that Christians have created a mean ass projection, a big enemy; and they won’t let go.  They’d rather fear, die, and fight their own reflection.  How stupid is that?  It’s real stupid, but the Christian church has been doing that for ages.

The correction to this problem is so easy.  However, this is the problem with the false masculine role.  It sees it’s reflection in the feminine role; and then blames the feminine.  It breaks the mirror when all it has to do is let go.

 

Religious Extremism

In “God’s Slave,” the main character’s parents were murdered as a young child.  He becomes a slave of the system, and they groom him to become a suicide bomber.  He’s told that the best life comes after suffering, which is not any different than the Christian notion of heaven after suffering on earth.  He’s told to go live a normal life until he’s called.  This is also no different than Christians waiting for the call.  And he’s told that being a martyr is the ultimate.  Of course, Jesus was a martyr.  So it quickly becomes apparent that Christians and Muslims share the same ridiculous beliefs.  Let go of these core beliefs, and the battle ends.  You won’t fight when you don’t believe in suffering, when you know who you are, and when you realize Jesus was an initiate, not a martyr.

Eventually, the protagonist gets the call.  By this time, he’s married and has a child who he loves very much.  He’s got a sweet, compassionate side to him.  But he’s a slave to his handler, his authority, who is a slave to the false God.

He leaves his wife and child and reports for duty.  They have no idea that he’s about to become a martyr.  He’s strapped with explosives and gets in a car filled with explosives.  He is to drive to a synagogue.  But when he reaches the synagogue, which is filled with people, he’s stopped by a young child who is standing in front of his car and won’t move.  He gets out of the car, picks up the child, and hands him to his father.  And in that compassionate, caring act, his brainwashing cracks; he remembers his own child, who is about the same age.  He remembers love; and he aborts the mission.

His handlers are going to kill him as punishment.  They say he has disappointed Allah.  He calmly replies, “No Allah didn’t ask me to kill, you did.”   That’s the realization of someone who has seen the illusion for what it is.  They realize that they’re being controlled by humans, not God.  It’s the key to freedom and the gateway to heaven on earth.

 

Life as a Movie

Each of our lives is like that movie, and we have been brainwashed by our handers to believe the movie we live in is true when it’s really just an illusion.  We’re all slaves to other humans who call us into roles.  But love and compassion cracks our programming.

Like the suicide bomber, our mind was programmed to think we’re being punished or rewarded by God.  We break free when we realize that humans are controlling us, punishing or rewarding us — not God.  We aren’t free until we say “No” to our handlers and take back our free will.  Then we can use the power of truth and unconditional love to dissolve the illusion that has imprisoned us.  We can start allowing our own True Self to write the script for our life.  The protagonist of “God’s Slave” was not killed; he was free.

The Host Parasite Relationship

Host Parasite relationship

By Cathy Eck

 

The Host

I never thought much about the notion of hosting until visiting Ecuador for a few months. I considered the woman who owned the home I stayed in to be my host.  Ironically, I started having problems with my internet provider during that time; of course, they were my “hosting” company.  The odd thing was that my hosting company was perfect until I went to Ecuador.  Clearly an old belief was coming up for releasing.

I decided to review my memories around hosting in general.  Many memories surfaced, and all were the same situation with different people.   I’d meet someone in my home or a neutral place, and we’d get along great.  Then they’d invite me to their home where they were the host.  Now I couldn’t stand them.  I felt as if they gave me food and wine in exchange for the whining that I would endure until I could politely escape their house of horrors.  One of these people even said to me, “Now you’re on my turf.”

The host role is a masculine role.  The true masculine host gives unconditionally.  The false masculine host looks like it gives when it actually takes like a parasite; it gives conditionally.

 

Host and Parasite

The word host has an opposite or a complement, depending on how you look at it — parasite.  Wikipedia says, “The host and parasite exert reciprocal selective pressures on each other, which may lead to rapid reciprocal adaptation.”

Humans shouldn’t be adapting to each other’s false selves.  Sadly, most relationships have a fragile quality to them.  Everyone behaves like tightrope walkers focused on holding the delicate balance.  People adapt to the most fragile ones; and everyone is secretly miserable.

A whining host behaves like a parasite, sucking the life out of its guests.  As a false masculine, they establishes the tone of the experience for everyone.  The false masculine commands the power and control of the masculine role while also receiving the benefits that belong to the feminine role.  Consequently, people seek the spotlight in the home or the stage.  They get the power, and they get the attention and/or money too.  They often label that win-win.  Those of us in the feminine role label it lose-lose.  We have no power; and we receive things we don’t want.

My internet hosting company pretended to serve me.  But they sent me crap that shut down my computer and websites.  I felt that I had to protect myself from my own host.  Ah, I was now seeing the pattern.  I felt the same way when visiting these hosts — like I needed to protect myself.  Since I’m not a fan of wrapping myself in white light, I wanted to find out how I ended up in this situation over and over.

Power in the illusion requires getting others to submit to or follow the leader’s beliefs so they can get what they want.  If you look at royalty, they give nothing; they have all the power, and boy do they receive.

Both of my hosts wanted me to listen to their self-inflicted problems and feel sorry for them.  I was supposed to marinate in their crap and not hold them responsible.  I had to pretend the cause of their problem was a mystery.  I had to pretend that they were a victim.  As a good guest, I was supposed to follow this social norm.  It was time to let that go.  I’d had enough.

 

The Escape

We generally feel powerless in the feminine role.  We’ve been trained that we can’t or shouldn’t get the masculine host to change.  But I’ve discovered that when I completely let go of my feminine role in any drama (including my emotions), the scene does change.  When I let go of my feminine role in my relationship with the host, I moved beyond roles (or into a True Masculine place from their point of view).  Now I only had to make sure that I didn’t judge or label them.  I had to make sure that I was speaking truthfully, not grabbing the stage.  Frequently, the host would relax; and our conversation became light, creative, and fun.  They became a proper host.

If they just wanted power and control over me (or still thought they did), they’d try to see me as the problem — a parasite.  They wanted their beliefs or drama validated.  They were now feeling the emotions that they were previously projecting out by whining.  The angst was where it belonged, with the whiner (parasite pretending to be a gracious host).

I’d often get trapped at this point because they thought that I was causing their emotions.  If I didn’t say anything, they’d often say, “Are you doing something to me?”  Often I’d doubt myself.  Was I the cause?  We live in a strange world where we believe we can say horrible things without paying a price.  And when held accountable, people blame the listener or questioner for the emotion they feel.

When I encounter new belief patterns, I go back into my memory and replay old situations with my new understanding.  I see the memory as it was; but this time, I also let go.  I don’t take in what the other people said; I see their beliefs as just beliefs — powerless, untrue, and certainly not who they are.  I watch as the situation changes in my mind.  It has to.  Of  course, it’s perfect in my mental workshop; but my repaired memories become my new history.  This sets the tone for my future real life exchanges.  Yes, we can change the past.

Eventually, in my mental workshop, I saw that the human opposite of host wasn’t parasite; it was guest.  The host now unconditionally gave; and I, the guest, joyously received.  Ironically, once I did this inner work, my Ecuadorian host fixed up my room.  She started to give to me in many ways.  And my internet hosting company took responsibility and fixed their problem.

Fire, Passion, and Desire

Calaveras Big Tree National Park

By Cathy Eck

 

Calaveras Big Trees National Park

I recently took a day trip to Calaveras Big Trees National park in California.  The park is home to some of the remaining giant sequoias — the world’s largest trees.  These trees are so amazing.  When you’re underneath them, you feel the same calmness that you feel from a wise elder.  The largest sequoia is 275 feet tall and 36.5 feet in diameter.  The oldest tree lived for 3200 years.

The most enlightening fact that I learned about the Big Trees was that they need exposure to fire at certain times in their life cycle in order to thrive.  Before humans arrived, fires were started, mostly by lightning; those fires might burn uninterrupted for months at a time.  The first people to arrive in this area, over 12,000 years ago, understood this cycle; they adapted to it.  They realized that the fire improved their own food supply, gave them better materials, and opened travel routes.  But modern humans build permanent houses; we obviously don’t want our houses destroyed.  So we put out the fires the giant trees need to survive.

These long-living trees aren’t harmed by the fire.  The fire burns out the competition for water and sunlight.  Without the fire, the forests become unhealthy and overcrowded.  The forest rangers are now looking for ways to create small controlled fires.  In this way, they can keep the trees alive and not destroy the nearby houses and other buildings.

 

Fire as a Symbol

Fire has always been associated with the sun for obvious reasons.  Since the ancient people viewed the sun as the perfect metaphor for God, because it gave light, warmth, and was unconditional, fire came to represent God or pure divine energy.  Fire also symbolizes the energy of passion and desire.  And it’s equated with emotions that flow outward such as anger, hatred, jealousy, and rage.  Fire is yang and assertive in nature; it’s masculine energy.

If our desires comes from our True Self, our fire is in balance; we offer our best to others and the world.  On the other hand, if we’re passionate about achieving false desires and winning at the expense of others, our fire is burning out of control.

Likewise, when beliefs fill our mind that restrict our true desires or passion, our fire can’t burn.  We drown our fire with the water of emotion.

 

The Message of Fire and the Big Trees

If the giant sequoia does thrive and live a long life, they’re among others trees; but they stand alone, independent.  Likewise, codependence, and the emotions that go with trying to please others, often restricts our own growth.  Their weeds choke out our life force.

Too often, people feel responsible for another’s emotions.  The truth is that our emotions are the feminine reflection of our own masculine mind.  When we join another in sympathy, we usually strengthen their beliefs and drown with them.  We put out our fire trying to put out their fire.  In truth, they just might need a long-burning fire to destroy their weeds.

If we’re emotional or overly sensitive, it’s time to look very hard at our desires or trim back our beliefs.  Sadly, some religions and philosophies prescribe just the opposite.  They tell people to trim their desires and believe their beliefs.  In this way, they pour water on our fire.

 

Level Confusion

The metaphor of the giant sequoia trees is ripe for level confusion.  The typically physically-focused person would look at the sequoia’s need for fire and relate it to people.  They’d say, “Yes, this is a message that when population is too big, we suffocate each other.”  They’d take it as proof for the survival-of-the-fittest theory.  They’d suggest getting rid of the little people so the big ones can thrive.  They’d even condemn people for building permanent homes.

Symbolism is harmful and ineffective when it is interpreted at the purely physical level. It causes people to see others as the problem.  Then the problem can’t be solved.  Symbolism unites only when we apply it to our minds.

Symbols, just like emotions, always point inward.  They show us what to let go, not where to go or what to do.  For the trees to grow very old and very large, they need the support of fire.  If their life force (fire energy) is strong, they’re not consumed by the fire, they’re nourished by it.  Mythology often talks about disasters destroying people and places.  But it also talks about the connected ones (who had the fire of God within) and knew what was coming.  They either had the power to endure it or the foresight to move out of the way.  When we don’t have pure inner fire, we can’t endure the outer fire.  Our beliefs or weeds steal too much of our life force.

Fire is assertive.  When our fire is from the True Self, we’re a contribution to the earth.  We give more than we take.   Our unconditional True Self burns away the beliefs that keep people sick, suffering, or enslaved.  The giant sequoia isn’t suffering or sacrificing as it grows; it is just doing what comes naturally.  It’s inspired from within so nature removes what could harm it from without.

Weeds (or beliefs) take far more than they give.  They keep us from reaching our true potential.  Beliefs block our true fire, our real power.  Like the weeds, they take all the nutrients and give nothing back.  When they arise, with their powerful flood of emotion, we must face them, not fear them.  We must let them know that they are false, and they have no power.  Each time we do that, we are purified by the fire of truth and wisdom.  One day, we’re the tallest tree in the forest — not by force of will but by force of nature.