Intention: Win-Win (Compassion) or Win-Lose

Compassion

By Cathy Eck

 

Win-Win

As an entrepreneur, I read lots of business books.  When I finished one, I’d go to Barnes & Noble to get another.  One night, I stopped at B&N to get my latest fix.  I noticed a book on the display that said “Win-Win” on the cover.  I didn’t buy the book or even look inside it.  But I loved the sound of those words — win-win.

I bought another book and left the store.  But I couldn’t get win-win out of my mind.  I thought, “I’m going to start living my life that way.  If something isn’t win-win, I won’t do it.”  I didn’t realize that I’d just opened a gateway to compassion…one of the most important keys to initiation.

The next day, during a restroom break at work, I was washing my hands; and I dripped soap on the sink counter.  Those soap droplets caught my attention.  I wondered if just leaving them on the sink was win-win.  After all, we had a maid.  But then the soap would stay there looking messy until the maid came.  I also sensed an attitude of superiority in me as if I was too important to clean.  That didn’t feel win-win.  How could I possibly be more important than the woman who cleaned this restroom?  It really wasn’t win-win to pass the responsibility for my mess on to the maid even if it was technically her job.

Eventually, I pulled down some paper towel and cleaned up my mess.  But I hadn’t just cleaned the counter.  I’d also cleaned something in my mind.  I realized that when I reached that win-win place of thinking over this stupid little thing, I felt a deep calmness that I’d not felt since childhood.  It was way beyond anything I’d felt with meditation.  Meditating quieted my mind; but I was letting go of my shallow false masculine perspective, which freed my mind.

Back at my desk, I picked up a sales contract.  Suddenly it didn’t look win-win.  I called the potential customer and offered to make changes in his favor.  I wasn’t playing games anymore; I treated him the way I would want to be treated.  Again, I felt that peace.

This experiment started with a physical focus — doing that which was win-win.  But it shifted into something much bigger — letting go of any thought that wasn’t win-win.  That, I’d learn, is the meaning of compassion.  Compassion is what tames the false masculine.

 

Intention

About ten years later, people started to write books on the power of intention.  But there was no compassion in their intention setting.  They were thinking an intention before they did something like “Send me that which is for the highest good.”  It sounded nice, but they were washing their hands of responsibility — letting the universe decide what’s good for them.  Unfortunately, the universe doesn’t act as our fair and just concierge; we get what we believe.  This allowed the person to look compassionate without being compassionate.  Compassion doesn’t happen until we let go of beliefs.  It purifies our mind when we let go of the false masculine’s judgmental win-lose, good-evil, or right-wrong thoughts.

Others set intentions like, “I intend to win this race,”  or “I intend to lose twenty pounds this month.”  They were willing the future into submission for their benefit — another talent of the false masculine.

My intention to live from win-win caused me to go deep into my mind and to question my own thinking.  I was letting go before I even understood letting go.  To really get to win-win on any subject, I had to consider everyone that might be affected by the situation — the true application of the Golden Rule.  Letting go of the false masculine beliefs and judgments transformed my false physically-oriented perspective into the true, pure mental perspective of life.  Of course, when my mind was right, top of the triangle with no opposite thoughts, my behavior followed.  I couldn’t imagine harming another.

 

Compassion

Later, I decided to do my Ph.D. Dissertation on the initiation story of Jesus, and I used this same technique.  Unlike Christians, I didn’t want to copy Jesus’ actions; I wanted to understand, and find in myself, the mind of Jesus.  I’d take a Bible quote that didn’t make sense such as, “The meek shall inherit the earth.”  I started with the win-lose interpretations that I’d been taught:  “You have to be submissive to get to heaven.  You get rewarded for giving others what they want.”  None of the thoughts that popped into my mind felt win-win.  They didn’t produce that calmness or compassion.  So I kept dropping every belief that arose and kept digging for the truth.  You see, the truth wasn’t in some guru or in the ethers for channels to pick up; it was in my mind resting quietly below all of my false knowledge.

After letting go of many thoughts about this quote, I dropped into that now familiar place of win-win.  Jesus was talking about the mental, not the physical.  He was already in that compassionate place when he spoke.  When we let go of our beliefs and knowledge, our mind becomes meek, quiet, and pure.  We can’t imagine fighting or willing in order to get what we want.  And yet, our meek mind is extraordinarily powerful because our mind is so clear and creative.  We easily get whatever we focus our mind on — we inherit the earth.

I repeated this process for thousands of hours until I decoded the path of initiation from the story of Jesus.  He was a compassionate dude; and it wasn’t because of what he did but because of how he thought.  Then I saw it everywhere — initiation was embedded in many ancient myths and legends.  You can’t see it until you get the right perspective.  Real freedom, real peace, and real power are revealed when we exercise compassion and let go until our thinking becomes completely win-win for everyone.  That’s how we bring heaven back to earth.

God’s Slave and Religious Extremism Exposed

God's Slave

By Cathy Eck

 

God’s Slave

I recently saw a phenomenal movie at the San Diego Jewish Film Festival called “God’s Slave.”  I doubt that it will ever get wide distribution so my commentary is going to include a spoiler alert.  It wouldn’t have ruined it for me to know the entire true story.

It seemed like a crazy coincidence to see this movie just after my father sent me some Republican propaganda, which of course explained how Muslims deserve to be hated and feared.  The writer was clearly caught in his extreme fear of terrorism.  I told my dad that I neither hated nor feared Muslims.  The discussion ended at that point.

 

Hate and Fear

Hating and fearing others actually perpetuates the illusion.  This is why Jesus said not to judge others and to love your enemy.  It’s not spiritual advice.  It’s practical.

Our false mind tells us that hating, judging, fighting, or criticizing our enemy will somehow make things right.  But that doesn’t work and never has.  When we hate or judge someone, we’re in our false masculine mind focusing on our own projection.  When we love our enemy or let go of our beliefs about our projection, it disappears.  Love and truth are the most perfect healing forces, they dissolve what’s false and leave what’s true.  You can never go wrong with unconditional love.

Fear of the false God made him into the illusion’s superstar.  Fear generates emotion; the illusion feeds off of emotion.  When people stop fearing God or fighting over who’s God is the real God, the whole thought form will dissolve.

My dad’s ridiculous email started off with a very strange line.  It said, “Muslims believe Allah, a moon God.”  Now I don’t know if Allah was originally a moon god or not, and it’s not important.  The person writing the email was Christian; Christians have a fake God too, but they think their God is true.  Jesus was considered a Sun God.  Yahweh was most likely a sky/storm God.  But calling Allah a “moon” God got me thinking.  The Muslim religion is a religion of submission — that’s a feminine quality, like the moon.  If we hate and fear anything in the feminine role, we get fear and hate back.  The feminine is reflective, like a mirror.  So how can you blame the feminine?   You can’t.  What this Christian email writer was saying, without realizing it, was that Christians have created a mean ass projection, a big enemy; and they won’t let go.  They’d rather fear, die, and fight their own reflection.  How stupid is that?  It’s real stupid, but the Christian church has been doing that for ages.

The correction to this problem is so easy.  However, this is the problem with the false masculine role.  It sees it’s reflection in the feminine role; and then blames the feminine.  It breaks the mirror when all it has to do is let go.

 

Religious Extremism

In “God’s Slave,” the main character’s parents were murdered as a young child.  He becomes a slave of the system, and they groom him to become a suicide bomber.  He’s told that the best life comes after suffering, which is not any different than the Christian notion of heaven after suffering on earth.  He’s told to go live a normal life until he’s called.  This is also no different than Christians waiting for the call.  And he’s told that being a martyr is the ultimate.  Of course, Jesus was a martyr.  So it quickly becomes apparent that Christians and Muslims share the same ridiculous beliefs.  Let go of these core beliefs, and the battle ends.  You won’t fight when you don’t believe in suffering, when you know who you are, and when you realize Jesus was an initiate, not a martyr.

Eventually, the protagonist gets the call.  By this time, he’s married and has a child who he loves very much.  He’s got a sweet, compassionate side to him.  But he’s a slave to his handler, his authority, who is a slave to the false God.

He leaves his wife and child and reports for duty.  They have no idea that he’s about to become a martyr.  He’s strapped with explosives and gets in a car filled with explosives.  He is to drive to a synagogue.  But when he reaches the synagogue, which is filled with people, he’s stopped by a young child who is standing in front of his car and won’t move.  He gets out of the car, picks up the child, and hands him to his father.  And in that compassionate, caring act, his brainwashing cracks; he remembers his own child, who is about the same age.  He remembers love; and he aborts the mission.

His handlers are going to kill him as punishment.  They say he has disappointed Allah.  He calmly replies, “No Allah didn’t ask me to kill, you did.”   That’s the realization of someone who has seen the illusion for what it is.  They realize that they’re being controlled by humans, not God.  It’s the key to freedom and the gateway to heaven on earth.

 

Life as a Movie

Each of our lives is like that movie, and we have been brainwashed by our handers to believe the movie we live in is true when it’s really just an illusion.  We’re all slaves to other humans who call us into roles.  But love and compassion cracks our programming.

Like the suicide bomber, our mind was programmed to think we’re being punished or rewarded by God.  We break free when we realize that humans are controlling us, punishing or rewarding us — not God.  We aren’t free until we say “No” to our handlers and take back our free will.  Then we can use the power of truth and unconditional love to dissolve the illusion that has imprisoned us.  We can start allowing our own True Self to write the script for our life.  The protagonist of “God’s Slave” was not killed; he was free.

Roles: When the Feminine Pretends to be Masculine

Masculine or Feminine

By Cathy Eck

 

Confusion of Roles

Roles become very confusing when they’re not played as designed.  I’ve written about the masculine who pretends to be feminine — an authority figure who projects out an enemy, like Bush/Obama projecting Osama Bin Laden and Muslim extremism.  The leader pretends to be a victim of their own evil projection.  They want support/service/sacrifice from followers in order to slay the evil dragon.  If the followers succeed, the leader becomes a hero.  It’s a very old archetype.

This leader needs blindly obedient followers to slay his dragon.  We see such a person in the movie, “American Sniper,”  the true story of Chris Kyle, known as “The Legend” for his large number of kills.  Controversy has erupted over whether Chris Kyle was a hero or a predator.   Both labels are right in the illusion; both put Kyle at the bottom of the triangle.  If there’s a real enemy, then he’s a hero.  If there’s no enemy, then he’s a predator in the illusion.

Soldier is a strange role.  We believe a soldier is highly masculine.  Just try not to think of masculinity while watching Bradley Cooper play Chris Kyle.  It’s difficult!  However, soldier is actually a feminine role; soldiers salute, take orders, and blindly obey authority.  They’re feminine to the higher rank (who are feminine to their superior).  Soldiers only become masculine when they kill.  As observers, we get tricked by this role shift because we’re trained to look with physically-oriented eyes.

 

Roles Clarified

The original definition of roles made sense.  The masculine role followed the ideal of the sun and unconditionally gave.  The feminine role unconditionally received (like the moon or earth).  A person in a true masculine role would only think or speak the truth.  Their feminine side would be calm and receive original, creative ideas.

But a false masculine projects an illusion based on beliefs, which creates a fantasy, horror, or drama.  Those who are feminine followers to the false masculine leader, and honor their belief system, are no longer creating their OWN life.  Consequently, they’re either highly emotional or highly suppressed.  Only the person at the top of the pyramid — the supreme handler — has the script.  For most people, that supreme leader/handler is the false God — the imaginary leader of the illusion.  His constitution is the Old Testament.

 

Feminine Pretends to be Masculine

Remember, the false leader is an authority holding a masculine role but pretending to be feminine, a victim of someone or something outer.  This false leader pretends to be innocent; but that’s because we’re trained to ignore the fact that they projected their OWN enemy.

Any follower of a false masculine is playing a feminine role.  Look closely at Chris Kyle.  If you take out his back story, he appears to be a macho man — an expert marksman —  a killer of evil extraordinaire  — a hero.  But the movie, “American Sniper,” doesn’t ignore the back story.  He’s not masculine at all.  He’s feminine pretending to be masculine.  

Kyle’s story starts at birth, not at enlistment.  His dad rewarded him for his shooting skills as a young child.  He wanted dad’s approval and ignored his strong emotional signal screaming that killing wasn’t right.   He lived in Texas and attended a Fundamentalist church.  He quickly became feminine to his dad and religious authorities.  His dad tells him that he’s a protector, like a sheep dog; he buys the label because it sounds good.  By the time 9/11 occurred, he was one angry dude with a feminine, obedient mind.  From the physical perspective, he was masculine.  But from the mental perspective, he was completely feminine.

We fall into this quicksand because we confuse the physical and mental perspectives.  The True Self lives in the mental realm; the false self is physically focused.  From the mental, True Self perspective, we are NEVER an authority over another.  We can lead others for a common purpose, but we can’t be their ultimate authority.

Anyone who believes in the false God, is an expert of knowledge, or teaches information that has been pre-chewed by those in the illusion has a feminine mind.  Their position of authority doesn’t change their mindset.  They aren’t harmful unless we make them our authority.  I might take a class in Photoshop from a Photoshop expert to become a better user.  I’m glad s/he exists because the knowledge is useful; but I don’t let him/her tell me what to do with Photoshop.

Many people notice that the highest leaders appear to be feminine to some hidden hand, which is called God by some and the illuminati or big business by others.  If we could dissect the authority’s mind, however, I think we’d find that they’re actually following mom and dad’s illusion most of the time.

 

Level Confusion in Roles

When we follow any other human, we enter their fallen perspective because only our false self is outer directed.  A true leader will always point us back inside.  They won’t take our power even if we insist on giving it to them.

The calm demeanor of false leaders is often mistaken for the calmness of the True Self.  But false calmness is actually the result of the leader’s ability to project emotions on to followers.  We see the leader’s true colors when we refuse to serve their cause or fight their enemy.  The false masculine leader blames, guilts, and shames until we accept their beliefs and do their dirty work.  The say they’ll lead us to the promised land, but they actually spin us around in the desert forever.

To unravel this mess, we must clean up our own mind.  We have both of these false masculine characters within our false mind resting at the bottom of the triangle; often they’ve brought us rewards.  Sometimes, we fear the responsibility of leading our OWN life.  We fear making mistakes or not having answers.  But the only authority that is fair, harmless, and doesn’t err is our own True Self.  No one else can offer us better advice.