Slavery and Freeing Our Minds

Statue in Cuenca, Ecuador

By Cathy Eck

 

Traveling in the Feminine Role

I’m back home reflecting on my nearly three months in Ecuador.  When most people travel, they either go as tourists, which means they see the sites and stay in places that are sanitized from reality; or, they go in a service, ministry, or business capacity.  Tourist and service are both masculine roles.  In masculine roles, we have choices and power (even influence) over others and our situation.  In traditional feminine roles, we have little or no influence.  We must observe and let go of whatever comes at us.  Traveling in the feminine role is useful for freeing the darkest parts of our mind — especially our inner slavery.  It’s an inner, rather than outer, adventure.

In a country like Ecuador, everyone shares the same point of view.  They practice the same religion, and their culture has been molded into one common perspective.  They have no reason to question their perspective.  You’re either an insider or an outsider.

I accepted my feminine role as an outsider.  No one there even knew what I did.  I wasn’t trying to change minds; I was simply trying to free my own mind.   We tend to blindly accept beliefs when we’re in the feminine role because of our training as young children.  By willingly taking on a feminine role, we can see, discriminate, and let go of the automatic mental programs that accepted the beliefs of others without discriminating first.

 

Slavery

When I got home, this quote by Ezra Pound was on my Facebook wall.  “A slave is one who waits for someone to come and free him.”  Powerful quote!  

Physically everyone in Ecuador was free; yet mentally, no one was free.  We can’t see mental chains; most people train themselves to no longer feel them.  They don’t notice the smallness of their prison cell because others have the same cell.   They label their chains a fact of life — the truth.  

When acceptance lacks the desire for change, it’s not acceptance; it’s apathy.  Apathy keeps us stuck in slavery; apathy places hope in a savior.  

I grew up in a town with conformity of beliefs, much like Ecuador.  It was filled with apathy masking as acceptance.  Things usually came easier to me because my desires didn’t have to travel through a huge labyrinth of beliefs.  Then I married one of the insiders; over time, his cultural and religious beliefs infected my mind.  Everything became more difficult for me as his beliefs took root in my mind.  I kept weeding — attempting to remove his beliefs.  I just couldn’t find the causal root.  There was something in my mind that caused me to blindly believe him over and over again.  I looked everywhere for someone that could erase his beliefs — kissed a lot of frogs that weren’t princes during that time in my life.  I was stuck in slavery, looking for someone to rescue me.  No one did because they were slaves too.  Their techniques could provide relief from the effects; but they couldn’t eliminate the beliefs — the cause.

When I discovered letting go of beliefs, I was overjoyed.  I could now free my husband from his mental slavery too.  But he was looking for a physical savior.  My truth sounded crazy; he thought his beliefs were the truth.  “What, my problems aren’t real?  You think I created my problems?  You think my beliefs aren’t true?” he said again and again.  Over time, problems tend to have payoffs.  People bond around problems.  To expose their illusion feels unloving.  His family believed they were given a burden by God to carry together; and I was unwilling to share that burden so I was bad and unloving.

I hated their judgment of me.  I wasn’t bad or unloving; I was trying to free them.  I constantly tried to defend myself.  But proving their beliefs wrong meant holding on to their beliefs.  My freedom required letting go of their beliefs, not proving them wrong.  Right-wrong, win-lose, good-evil all keep us stuck in mental slavery.  Only by realizing that a belief is powerless and false, and letting it go, do we achieve real freedom.  We don’t have to correct beliefs; we only have to stop fueling them.  Let them go.  Without fuel, they die a natural death.

Ecuador tested me to stay free of beliefs that were very familiar.  Even with beliefs as thick as mud, I usually managed to let go.  Whenever I fell for a belief, I could feel my emotions closing in on me; I’d immediately go to work on my own mind.  I didn’t try to defend myself.  I didn’t try to prove them wrong.  I simply  took responsibility for my error and dug myself back out of the mental quicksand.  This time, I didn’t become a slave in their illusion.  I passed my own initiation test.

I observed the causal patterns within my mind that caused me to believe others in the past.  In almost every case, I didn’t want to be judged, I tried to defend myself, or I didn’t want to follow their rules.  In order to prove them wrong, I needed to accept their belief as real.  Now I was at war — the inner battle of good and evil that never ends.  The more I tried to fight their belief in my mind, the more real it became.  I was keeping myself enslaved in their world.  Only I could free myself.

Freedom is about knowing your OWN mind so well that others can’t tarnish it.  Freedom is about discriminating with such mastery that no one can trap us in their illusion.  Freedom is being our True Self anywhere and anytime.  Escaping the illusion requires thinking from true and false and micromanaging our own mind while allowing others to think whatever they want.  The other’s perspective was real for me only because I believed them.  They didn’t enslave me: I enslaved myself.  Therefore, I could also FREE myself and so can everyone else.

 

Eliminating Right and Wrong Through Win-Win

Jesus and food

By Cathy Eck

 

Win-Win Thinking Instead of Right and Wrong

Win-win thinking isn’t easy to apply.  Most humans believe that if everyone thought like them, the world would be perfect.  Win-win thinking is about letting go of our beliefs, even if we aren’t really wrong by appearances, social protocol, or religious standards.  It’s about resisting the temptation to force others to accept or support our perspective of right and wrong.  When we force others to think like us, even if we speak the truth, we get a false self connection with them.  When we let go, we move into a True Self connection; that’s what we really want with everyone.  A True Self connection is our natural state of unity; a false self connection is possession.

A few days ago, I was out taking a walk.  Two of my housemates apparently got into a discussion while I was gone over the right and wrong of drinking wine.  Both of them are Evangelical Christians so you wouldn’t expect them to disagree.  The woman said that drinking is wrong because her pastor says so; Jesus drank only grape juice.  The man said that Jesus drank wine and even made water into wine.  The woman then countered that if Jesus made it, it was special wine, not like the wine we buy at the store.  By the time I returned, they were no longer fighting.  I didn’t know anything about the disagreement.

Soon I learned what transpired while I was gone because each side made comments that showed the argument was still bothering them. My perspective wasn’t even within the scope of the argument so I didn’t get involved.  However, comments about the argument kept arising in conversation; I realized that it was time for me to step back and look at the situation from win-win.  There was clearly something for me to learn.  I couldn’t just ignore the argument even if I wasn’t a participant; I had to make sure my mind was clear of right and wrong.  In that way, I could be a clear influence that might help them resolve their conflict more easily.

 

Grape Juice Argument

The grape juice argument is clearly win-lose.  She was saying that if you drink wine, you’re a sinner.  She was wielding her superiority position over the other by saying she was the right one; and he was wrong.  Naturally, this didn’t bring out the best in her opponent.

This was a familiar situation for me.  I’d often been viewed as wrong by others who had strong beliefs.  Their rightness depended on my wrongness.  They wanted me to submit to their point of view and admit they’re rightness.  I could see that people with beliefs assume you are opposing them if you just don’t share their belief.

 

Wine Argument

The man who voted for drinking wine had the natural win-win position.  The woman could choose juice and not be wrong in his perspective.  However, I learned later that he was trying to coax the woman to have a glass of wine.  So he compromised his naturally more expansive and win-win position by trying to get her to let go of her position and join him.

I’d been here too — often with loved ones.  I’d try to push them to let go, and I got caught in their illusionary battle over right and wrong.  Now there were two drowning minds in the sea of limitation.  I remembered that win-win means allowing the other to have their beliefs and suffer the consequences of them.

 

Expansion is the Goal

The goal of initiation was to let go of all beliefs.  Initiates didn’t care if others had beliefs because they didn’t believe anything that wasn’t true.  They didn’t accept limitation or the notion of right and wrong.  They suggested letting go, but never forced others to do so.

When people have a strong belief, they go looking for support.  They often want to force the other to support their point of view.  If we want support for the truth, we are holding truth as a belief.  When we downgrade the truth to a belief, it has no power.  We stop feeling the need for support.  

 

Eliminating Right and Wrong

When we get down to the basics, people have a right to do whatever they want to themselves.  Neither the man or the woman’s beliefs were harmful for the other if they each followed their own beliefs.  In a world where beliefs still exist, this is often the best possible outcome.

Ideally, if the people with the most limiting beliefs always let go and joined the more expansive perspective, we’d soon find ourselves all living in paradise. But not everyone wants to let go at this time.  So we must let go of our belief that other people’s beliefs can harm us or limit our life experience.  We tend to fear people with stronger or more limiting beliefs because we’ve all had people impose their beliefs on us in the past.  We’ve felt our world get smaller when others forced their beliefs on us.

If we recognize the beliefs of others as false, they won’t affect our life.  We don’t have to accept the beliefs of even one other; and we can let go of those we’ve already accepted.  Eventually, those with the least beliefs will lead the best lives.  When that happens, we won’t have to encourage anyone to let go.  They will see the obvious benefit and motivate themselves.

Bottom line…my housemate’s argument was absurd.  The very person they fought over said, “Listen and understand! It is not what goes into your mouth that makes you ritually unclean; rather, what comes out of it makes you unclean.”  Jesus didn’t care what people drank.  He cared what people said or believed.

Sadly, my housemates’ disagreement created separation; in truth, they were two friends who loved each other enough to expose beliefs that kept each of them from freedom.  They just don’t realize that yet.

 

Eliminating the Masculine and Feminine Roles

masculine and feminine roles

By Cathy Eck

 

Roles Aren’t True

In the last few posts, I’ve explained the masculine and feminine roles within the illusion.  Remember, roles hold the illusion together.  There’s no such thing as roles to the True Self.  Roles are real; they do exist in the illusory world.  However, they aren’t true.  This is good news; it means that we can let roles go.

The false self depends on roles; it has endless tricks to get people into roles where it can win, dominate, and be good or right.  If we aren’t aware of the purpose of roles, we fall prey to them.  We end up losing without even knowing we were competing; we submit to others who aren’t true leaders, or we look bad or wrong.

Our goal in initiation is to get back to the time before we got stuck in roles.  Of course, we received our first role the moment we were born — daughter or son.  Many people never escape that role.  They’re still submissive to their parents on the day they die.  Thus, they never live their own life.

 

Breaking Free of Roles

Recognition:  The first step is recognizing that we’re stuck in a role.

Masculine or feminine:  It’s important to determine whether we’re playing a masculine or feminine part.  Sometimes, it’s obvious.  Other times, we aren’t sure and must look for subtle clues.  Our body gives us clues through pain, disease, or symptoms.  Actions also speak louder than words.

Ghosts:  In feminine roles, we often feel oppressed.  But the oppressor or controller isn’t always who we think.  False minds don’t want us to find the real cause.  

My ex-husband believed I was controlling him, but I wasn’t.  I wasn’t willing to accept his beliefs as true, and to some false selves that can seem controlling.  But I wasn’t demanding or needy.  In fact, as I let go, he came to have so much freedom it was like he wasn’t married; but still he insisted that I was controlling him.  Eventually, I could see that it was his mother’s voice that was dominating him, not mine.  He just couldn’t see through his own veil of beliefs.

Roles are Mental:  The roles we see in the world are the effect of the roles we hold in OUR OWN mind.  If we feel controlled by someone, that’s because we still hold controlling authorities from our past in mind.  My ex-husband felt controlled by his own inner feminine (formed by his mother).  Whatever I said or did passed through that filter and tainted his hearing and vision.  He never heard me; he heard his mother’s voice replaying old tapes.

Make roles about roles, not about people who play them:  When we cast someone in a role, we’re holding them hostage.  My experience as a character in my ex-husband’s illusion created the desire to help others who feel stuck in someone else’s illusion to escape.  I never wanted another to go through that pain and confusion.

Step Back:  People playing the masculine role seldom have an incentive to let the role go.  They’re usually winning, looking good, and getting to be right.  Of course, their victories are illusory; but the world believes them.  They get approval, attention, and rewards from their roles and labels.  We can escape their illusion once we understand how to let go of beliefs.

We must realize that the roles that others play in our life exist as potentials in our mental drama.  We appear to be victims in the illusion; but we aren’t.  We’ve simply accepted beliefs that allow the roles to perpetuate.  Most of those beliefs come from religion, cultural traditions, or social conventions.  They’re beliefs that most don’t even question.

For example:  “I should listen to others.  Emotions are bad.  I should be nice to my authorities.  I can’t tell another that their belief is false.  If it happened to them, it could happen to me.  I can’t correct authority.”  In my case, the main belief that kept me stuck was a feminine role — a false perception of wife.  With each belief I let go, the false authorities in my mind lost more power until I could no longer play the false wife role.

Do the Process:  Once we find the belief, we’re only half way there.  Often people stop when they find the belief because of another belief that says, “Now that I found the cause, I’m free of the belief.”  This is common in the new age and creates projection, not release.  Denying a belief, excluding ourself, or choosing a new belief is NOT letting go.

To drop the belief, we must recognize the pain it has caused.  We must witness and release the emotion the belief generated, and we must realize the emotion is saying the belief isn’t true.  It may have been real in our past; but it wasn’t true.  The belief isn’t just false for us.  It’s false for everyone.  This is often hard to do.  If we’ve been pressed underneath an authority’s illusion for decades, we don’t feel like letting them off the hook.  But it’s worth it.

When we’ve completely eliminated a belief from our mind, we don’t experience it in the world anymore.  Now we can help others let go because we can discriminate again.

We must let go of any beliefs that say we need to believe others, especially authority.  False selves will do their very best to convince us that their beliefs are true.  The false self fears death.  Exposure is its kryptonite.  It tries hard to stay hidden beneath an acceptable mask.

Wash, Rinse, and Repeat:  If the stain doesn’t come all the way out,  keep letting go until it’s gone.  In this work, a belief is gone when you no longer see evidence of it.  It’s gone when you don’t fear it.  It’s gone when you know it’s false.  Persistence, honesty, and courage are the qualities that will take you all the way.

Help, I’m Stuck in Someone Else’s Illusion

Stuck in someone's illusion

By Cathy Eck

 

Ties that Bind

For the last two decades, I’ve been connecting the dots that link our stories, beliefs, minds, and physical experiences.  Prior to my research, I felt this link intuitively but couldn’t explain myself.  People thought I was an idiot because I wouldn’t believe their illusion was true.

I looked bad to others because I went against the grain of society.  But, I wasn’t a bad person.  I know that many readers of this blog feel the same way.  Fitting in isn’t an option; we just can’t make our minds small enough to fit into the tiny box that most people call normal life.  But often we unknowingly allow their limited perspective into our minds, and we feel like an alien that must join them or rebel.

Initiation, fortunately, isn’t about joining or rebelling.  It’s about letting go.

I’ve gotten emails from people from less civilized countries asking if I could remove a curse or get them out of someone’s mind.  It seems more obvious to those we call uncivilized that humans get stuck in the minds of others and can’t get out.  Clairvoyants describe this as cording.  They’ll say that they see an etheric cord between a person and their mother or witch doctor.

 

Roles

In other articles, I’ve discussed the masculine and the feminine roles within the illusion.  A witch doctor or a mother plays a masculine role because they have authority.  Feminine roles, like child or patient, have no authority within the illusion.  We all start out as children playing a feminine role.  If the person in the feminine role has a more expansive perspective than the person in authority (masculine role), they feel stuck in someone else’s small illusory view of the world.  Most find it easier to obey the authority than to fight them.  They accept the illusion as the truth and make the best of it.  Fortunately, not everyone is so submissive or life on this planet would be unbearable.

The world we see is a projection of our minds — our beliefs.  I know it doesn’t look that way.  But when you let go of beliefs and see the changes in your world, it becomes obvious.

If we’re submissive to another person’s authority, then we see their projection.  Powerful leaders figured this out eons ago; this is how one person can control the masses.  They get the masses to believe their beliefs.  And it seems people are willing to believe just about any ridiculous belief system.  This is especially true if the people believe the worst lie of all: that something that feels bad can be true.  If people are emotionally reversed to believe lies that clearly feel horrible, they will serve the masters for thousands of years without the authority even lifting a pinky finger.  Sound familiar?

People who belong to religions, see their religious leader’s projections.  As citizens, we see the projections of our political leaders; we even fight their wars.  If we’ve turned our mind over to educators, we see the world they teach us to see.  We also see the projections of the leader of our family, who sees their leader’s projections.  This is how we get stuck in someone else’s illusion.  It’s complex mental web of beliefs.

 

Removing the Cord

It seems impossible to escape because we didn’t create the illusion that imprisons us; it exists in the mind of our authority figures.  But I’m going to share with you the biggest secret of all.

To escape another’s illusion, you must recognize that every slave shares common beliefs with their master.  Every victim shares common beliefs with their abuser.  An authority can’t put you into their illusion without first selling you their beliefs, often with fear and force.

Since we borrowed the beliefs, we can let them go.  But we have to face the fear that caused us to accept the belief.  Once we know how to let beliefs go, our freedom is assured.  We can break open our prison door and take back all our power.

 

Two Sides of Beliefs

All beliefs are dual and have a good and evil side.  The two sides of the belief are like two sides of a coin.  You can get rid of the coin, but you can’t get rid of one side of it.  People try to be good which only makes evil stronger.  Religion lied — its totally designed to keep us stuck within the illusion by telling us to chase good.  It has no exit ramp.  Religious and spiritual people say that the more you move to the light the bigger the evil that chases you.  That’s how it looks in the illusion.  Increase good and you automatically increase your enemy in equal measure.

We’re back to our old standby, the triangle process.  To move up to the top of the triangle, we must get rid of both sides of the bottom of the triangle — not just the bad side.

So while many new agers tell you to take out your magical scissors and cut your magical cord and burn it in your magical fire, that is complete bullshit.  To fix any problem, we must find and correct the cause.  Regardless of how it looks, the cause is always in our own mind.

If we let go of the beliefs that we share with the person in authority, we slowly set ourselves free.  We can’t exist in their illusion if we don’t share their beliefs.  It just isn’t possible.

We’re often afraid to let go of our good because we fear we’ll be bad.  But the opposite of light and good is actually false.  If our goodness and light is true and real, we can’t let it go.  If our goodness and light is false, we’re better off without it.  The only way to end evil is to get rid of its twin — good.  When you get rid of the false good and the fluorescent light, you end up with the truth.  You are free.