Labels: The Seeming True Self Destroyer (Part II)

Pride humility judgment tolerance

By Cathy Eck

 

Victimhood and Victories

Labels create invisible prisons.  Sometimes the cell walls are imposed by others (discussed in Part I).  But often, people hold on to labels even though they’re destroying or imprisoning themselves.

Individuals and cultures hold on to victories and victimhood affecting their perspectives.  We’re all victims of the illusion — perpetrators and victims are just roles relabeled victor upon winning and victim upon losing.  Both hold on to their labels; therefore, history repeats itself.  Battles on all levels are simply the meeting of opposing beliefs.  The one who is least emotional will win.  The True Self can’t lose because at that state of mind, we have no beliefs or emotions.

The victorious hold on to their superior label because they perceive it gives them power.  Too often, the perks of victimhood are just too delicious.  The victim often becomes the perpetrator when they won’t let go because they perpetually punish the victor in their mind.

 

Heroism

True heroism is beyond labels.  Fighting a war or doing what most believe impossible is heroism in the illusion.  In truth, letting go takes far more courage and compassion, but you’ll never be labeled a hero for letting go.  A hero requires an enemy.  There are no enemies outside the illusion.  Batman isn’t needed without the Joker.

The illusion rewards and disempowers us at the same time.  We applaud someone who says: “I’m a recovering drug addict.”  At the same time, they’re told they’ll fight that battle for life.  Habits exist because the cause persists.  We didn’t create the cause; we simply believed the illusion just like everyone else.

Positive labels, like hero or survivor, feel good until we realize that good labels are false and have no lasting power to protect us.  Positive emotions keep us trapped just like those we label negative.  We love rags-to-riches and hero stories.  But to maintain the hero label, we must keep the poverty or opposition in our mind as a potential. One day the opponent or problem we thought we defeated could gain enough strength to return.  Letting go provides the safety that we think we can only get from heroism and winning.

 

Pride

Pride creates seductive labels that are often hard to let go.  A good example is the American bumper stickers that say, “My kid’s an honor student.”  Parents love them; most kids hate them.  Next grading period the kid doesn’t make honor roll.  Now they have to look at that fucking bumper sticker everyday and remember how they were special because of something they did, not who they are.

Titles are another form of label.  Doctor, General, Queen, or Pope are professions, but people use the titles to define superiority and inferiority based on knowledge, position, or pedigree.  The titles don’t belong outside the office.  We aren’t our jobs.

One who fears pride tends to avoid saying anything good about themselves.  They develop false humility that keeps them artificially small.  There’s nothing wrong with saying, “I got the Nobel Peace Prize.”  Everyone will be happy for us unless they have jealousy issues.  But if years later, we introduce ourself by saying, “I’m John, Nobel prize winner,” at a cocktail party where it’s out of context, then pride has come to stay.  Pride causes us to hold on to labels instead of letting them go and discovering who we really are.  When we make our career, college, team, nationality, or children’s accomplishments matter more than who we are, we’re screwed.

 

Judgments

Judgments are permanent labels.  Judging another creates false superiority by placing us in the masculine role.  But superiority is illusory.  The judge is just as locked in the illusion as the person they’re judging.  The pair now have an unhealthy false-self connection.  Judges are certain they’re right; some hold the other on the hook forever.  They choose false-self rightness over being their True Self.  The True Self views opposition as false and powerless.  There’s no need to punish or forgive; letting go is all that’s necessary.

It’s never too late to let go of judgment.  People have freed me of judgments without saying a word.  I could feel it.  When we hold another on the hook, we hold ourselves on the hook.  When another won’t free us, we feel that they’re in our mind or body.  The emotions feel endless.

Those emotions will leave if we recognize the judgement against us was false.  But we won’t do that if we fear the judge might be right.  We might need the judge.  Or we maybe we think our emotional connection with the judge is love.

Someone who constantly labels us with, “You are…” doesn’t love us.  Judging isn’t love.  We’re simply a good projection screen for them so they don’t have to own, fix, or suffer the consequences of their beliefs.  We’re an enabler if we allow them to continue to project on us.

When we let go of our feminine role in their life, we see that.  This took me so long to learn this lesson.  If the judge wants the truth, they’ll hear us.  If not, we’ll join the ecstatically joyous divorcees’ community.  We’ll realize we’d rather be happy and homeless than spend another day working for an authoritarian ass.  We’ll leave our religion for a breath of fresh air.  When we escape our handlers, we catch a whiff of the heaven on earth that the handler promised but never delivered.

“The false masculine role always tells us that we’re doing to them what they’re actually doing to us.”  Most people are on the receiving end of that giant illusory error because they’re stuck in false feminine roles.  The false masculine role has become far too proficient at the projection of labels.  Don’t wait for them to change.  Step out of the role as their mirror by letting go.  When there’s no one left to project on, the game will end.

 

 

 

What We’ll Do To Get Rid of Our Emotions

Emotions

By Cathy Eck

 

Releasing Emotions

People hate to let go of their seemingly good emotions, like excitement, hope, or pride.  “What would life be without excitement?,” they ask.  To get off the bottom of the triangle, however, we must let go of all the causes of emotions.  Excitement and anger are equally damaging effects of false beliefs.

When confronted with the notion of letting go … Actors fear losing their acting ability.  Artists think they’ll lose their creative edge.  People who believe they’re good fear they’ll lose their empathy.  Those addicted to romance believe emotional chemistry is love.  People fight to keep their emotions while simultaneously hating them.  The illusion falsely promises that it’s giving us what we can only get by letting go.

There are so many techniques to get rid of the emotions generated by our false beliefs.  Techniques like the Release Technique, EFT, and anything else that eliminates the emotion without removing the causal belief are popular.  But they don’t fix the cause unless you happen to let the belief go.

The false masculine eliminates unwanted beliefs that cause emotion.  They get it half right, and it would work if they had no psychological reversals.  They totally believe their view of life is the right view.  They forget to do the win-win test.  Karma might be win-win for a guru since he’s certain he has none.  But it imprisons billions of people.  The apocalypse might look win-win for Christian Bible Thumpers, but it sucks for the rest of us.  The false masculine holds themselves superior to the rest of the world.  In their eyes if we were all like them, earth would be perfect.  Can you see their delusion?

 

So Misunderstood

Emotions are so misunderstood.  Many take substances to eliminate emotions.  They keep jobs they hate or stay in bad marriages because the anger and pain they feel by staying where they are is less than the guilt, shame, poverty, or loneliness they believe they’ll feel if they leave.  

Some people create pain to get rid of their emotions, WTF?  Lisa Ling, reporter on Oprah’s channel, did a special on BDSM, Bondage and Discipline (BD), Dominance and Submission (DS), Sadism and Masochism (SM).  When asked why they wanted to be dominated, beaten, and chained; the people said, “It feels good.”  They believe they’re releasing emotions.  Cutting is another way of trading emotions for pain.  

People use sports for emotional release.  They scream at their televisions or use their emotions as fuel when they play.  I used to run.  I pounded the pavement in anger and thought that was healthy.  Sex without love is a sport if desired, rape if undesired by one participant.  Neither sex nor sports are bad; but they’re not meant to be emotional release techniques.

People fight over stupid things or beat their children for emotional release.  They justify it as discipline; but in truth, they just want to release their emotions.

Some vomit their emotions into creative work which is a false-self creativity.  Artistic expression lives in the True Self.  Creative ideas require us to go through the darkness of the false self.  That’s why many great artists become crazy, manic, or suicidal.  But what if they could let go?  They could enter the darkness without a scratch.

 

Good Emotions?

The most ridiculous way to get rid of emotions is to relabel them good.  We feel waves of excitement when something good happens only to be disappointed when we don’t get what we want.  This produces addictions to food, drugs, cigarettes, alcohol, parties, adventures, drama, workshops, healers and psychics, sex, religion, etc.  Life in the illusion creates the downward wave quite nicely.  We go to others or substances to pull us back up.  

Caretakers give outer care as well as a strong emotional projection.  People feel better when they serve because shit flows downhill.  Our unconscious masculine hates emotions; and it looks for victims to project its fears on.  People give to charity to feel prideful or eliminate guilt.  Charities represent the manifestations of our fears — the thing we want to see fixed in the world before it happens to us.    

Many spiritual teachers and religious leaders use talent or knowledge to claim the false masculine role and stay there.  They project their false feminine on followers.  They often don’t realize that they have God complexes, not God, in their masculine mind.  They believe they have the right to judge and punish their opposition — their own shadow — that would be us.  Most of us fear people with God complexes so we don’t challenge them.  If we do, we get what we expect — punishment, humiliation, or death.  This is why we’re often silent about things that truly matter.

In truth, emotions are all the same.  Labeling them keeps us stuck.  Emotional release techniques only create more confusion.  If we follow our emotions, they’ll  take us to the causal belief.  Once we understand this, freedom becomes possible.  Emotions go away naturally when we let go of the cause.  Our mind is a beautiful, organic system that leads us to the perfection that the illusion claims to be humanly impossible.

Letting go is compassionate.  I wanted to learn how because I didn’t want to project on others.  I didn’t want to explode on others.  I didn’t want to reflect their baggage.   I didn’t care to run anymore.  I just wanted to love and free others.

When tempted to seek emotional release or feed an addiction, first stop and ask yourself:  “What thought or problem am I trying to eliminate?”  Follow your emotion by witnessing it.  We listen and let go when we discover the causes.  As we practice letting go, we stop playing the “Pass the Emotions” game.

Even for those of us who practice witnessing our emotions and letting go, it isn’t fun when they arise.  But emotions are the guide on the path to the True Self — Heaven on Earth.  If you want that destination, you must take the path that goes there.

 

The Agony of Psychological Reversal

Psychological reversal

By Cathy Eck

 

Understanding psychological reversal is key to freeing our mind.  We’re all psychologically reversed in the areas of our life that don’t work perfectly.

 

What’s Psychological Reversal?

Years ago, I took a muscle testing class.  There was one woman in the class that creeped me out.  Lucky me; the instructor paired me with this creepy woman.  I was going to discover why she felt creepy.

When I asked her to think of a happy time, her arm went limp; she looked sad.  Then I asked her to think of a negative event in her life; she smiled brightly and got as strong as a bull.  I was sure I was doing something wrong; so I called over the instructor.  He said, “No you’re doing everything right.  This woman has extreme psychological reversal.  She gets strong in painful situations and weak when things are going well.”

Well I’ll be damned.  I never thought such a thing existed.  Then I realized that I’d seen mild cases of this all my life.  People who “shine in a crisis” or “smile while they suffer” are common.  Often, we label them heroes.

 

Psychological Reversal Begins…

My son was scared as hell on his first roller coaster ride.  At the time, I didn’t know about letting go.  I remember watching his mind work.  He was feeling strong fear, and he was trying to sooth the emotion with words like, “This roller coaster is reliable.  Others have ridden on it and lived.”  In that moment, I saw this normal thought pattern as backwards, false, and ineffective.

In hindsight, I should have asked him to dive into the fear and find the causal belief.  He would have let the cause go.  Then he would have ridden on the roller coaster with a calm joyousness.

We’re all highly trained to sooth, suppress, or numb emotions, and we resist going back and releasing the causal belief.  Our training keeps our false self in tact.  To end psychological reversal, we must break the normal pattern of thought.  The psychologically reversed mind views emotions as proof that their thinking is true.  It’s masterful at soothing the emotions with more thought.

Soothing fixes the problem for now.  Shining in a crisis fixes the problem in the moment.  But it doesn’t fix the causal belief.  Eventually, we’ll be soothing and shining again.  If we have deep psychological reversal and feel pride in our ability to shine in a crisis, we’ll never remove the causal thought.  We’ll fear losing our false purpose and superiority.

When we are not psychologically reversed, we notice that a thought doesn’t feel good, and we drop it.  Healthy, successful people do this naturally all the time.  Usually, they don’t even notice that they do it.

 

The Illusion Needs Psychological Reversal

Psychological reversal is key to making good soldiers, good slaves, and good subordinates.  Feminine roles in the illusion are about obedience and following.  The True Self can’t obey or follow someone who isn’t authentic, truthful, and loving (the true masculine).  The true feminine is about creativity, inspiration, and wisdom.  

When we make followers the good children or decorate soldiers for following orders, we create psychological reversals that are nearly impossible to break.  We create people who ignore their True Self and obey authority because they’re proud of being false selves.  We create people who willingly accept feminine roles that lead to their demise, destruction, or death.  

The false self of psychologically reversed people will fight to the death to make sure the True Self isn’t exposed because it fears annihilation.  The True Self is the enemy in psychological reversal because it won’t follow that which is false — it won’t obey false authority.  It questions them!

If we’re stuck and emotion isn’t moving or our body isn’t healing, the cause is often found in the emotions that we label positive.  Pride, excitement, romance, and hope are all emotions that are labeled positive.  However, emotions are neither positive or negative.  They’re just a signal that we’re thinking something false.  The emotions are a warning that we need to let go.

 

An Example 

Client:   My mother was abusive to me; I can’t forgive her.

Coach:  How does that feel when you think it?

Client:  Terrible

Coach:  So is it true?

Client:  Yes, it’s true. She beat me.

Coach:  It was your reality in the past.  But you aren’t being beaten now.  Your emotion right now is caused by labeling your mother abusive.  Labels aren’t true so they feel bad when we think them.

Client:  But it’s true.  She abused me.

Coach:  Her false self abused you.  In the past, you met her at her false self because you believed something that allowed her to abuse you.  She probably told you that you were bad and deserved punishment, and you believed her because she was your authority.  Then she delivered punishment.

Client:  Yes, she said I was a wise ass; I needed it beaten out of me.

Coach:  Are you a wise ass?

Client:  She thought I was.  I was speaking what I saw; she didn’t like what I said.

Coach:  So you were exposing reality that she wanted to hide.

Client:  Yes, that’s it.

Coach:  Does it feel good to keep the label wise ass?

Client:  Kind of.

Coach:  You’re proud of wise ass, but it isn’t the truth of who you are.  It didn’t feel good when she labeled you wise ass.  So let it go.

 

Client let’s go, and she realizes that her mother is no longer abusive so she’s not a victim anymore.  She’s no longer holding on to her label of wise ass.  Her pride  in being a victim and being a wise ass has disappeared.  Her psychological reversal is gone.

Her mind is now seeing the whole picture clearly, and she is calm.  She realizes that she was only abused because she fell out of her True Self when she believed her mother.  Now she is truly wise; and it couldn’t ever happen again.