Motivation…Creation…It’s Not All About Doing

Nuts turn into giant oak trees.

By Cathy Eck

 

What’s Motivation?

I hear it every day from someone. I have no desires..no motivation…I’m lazy…bored with life. I don’t know what to do.

The curse of the illusion is hard work.  Some do hard physical work.  Others do hard mental work in order to figure out how to avoid doing hard physical work.  People who seek freedom are sick of hard work.  We discover letting go; then we turn it into hard work.

The freedom we desire is freedom from the physically oriented, fallen perspective.  When we fell into the illusion, we accepted lots of beliefs that made creating very hard and slow.  We became feminine to a false God (a slave driver).  We became slaves of his system.  Doing became boring, routine, and uncreative.

The popularity of motivational speakers, prosperity preachers, and life coaches is proof that people aren’t in touch with their natural inner motivation.  They pump people up and generate lots of emotion by telling them what they want to hear.

However, what we want to hear is usually the opposite of what we believe.  So their motivation wears off quickly; our established beliefs usually win in the end.

 

Reward and Punishment

As we let go, we’re all a lot like my oldest child, who was imprisoned in the educational system for six years before I set him free with unschooling.  He’d already become institutionalized.  He was accustomed to outer direction and rewards.  I asked him to look inside for his true desires. He had no fucking clue how to do that.  He begged me to tell him what to do, but I didn’t.  Eventually, his desires for outer motivation, direction, reward, and punishment died since he stopped feeding them.  He was left with inner motivation after about two years of tears.

Inner motivation is different from outer motivation.  The True Self knows the future, without going to psychics.  It’s not going to learn cursive writing unless it plans to be a calligrapher or old fashioned letter writer, but it will learn texting or typing.

The True Self hates spoon-feeding and memorization.  It wants to understand and experience everything.  But most schools ruin that innate desire.  Children learn to walk with very little assistance. They absorb the understanding from someone who already knows how to walk; then they figure it out.  They don’t read “Walking for Dummies.”

When my children wanted to learn something new, I’d point them toward the inventors and innovators in their field of interest — people who found their own wisdom.  I wanted them to trust their own ideas and to see that true desires always seem crazy to others because they’re not their desires.

Most people memorize and copy what others have discovered.  There’s no life force in that.  Beliefs, traditions, stories, knowledge, and rituals get passed down from generation to generation.  It’s old and dull.  In the beginning, such information was minimal and useful — like how to make fire.  Now we pass down useless knowledge, political persuasions, and antiquated religious ideas.

It’s habitual.  In ancient times, dead ancestors were labeled Gods.  Few people in the past have questioned their ancestral teachings.  People got used to being told things that felt bad or sounded illogical.   Sacrificing our desires for the sake of keeping the family and collective illusions alive became normal.  We stopped discriminating when we heard something from an elder, teacher, or expert.  After awhile, we’d believe anything.

 

Creation

To understand true motivation, we must understand the creation process. Creation starts in our mind as an original idea.  We think about the idea, and it grows.  Eventually, we desire to share our idea because sharing gives it life.  Then we’re inspired to action. The whole process is organic and enjoyable if no beliefs get in the way.  But invariably beliefs do get in the way, and we lose our motivation unless we let those beliefs go.

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If our desire is true, we’ll be inspired toward the next step and the next step; but we might not know the final destination.  We might not have support from our mother or friends, but we’ll find support in the form of validation, clarity, or insight.

Roles disappear.  No one can impose their beliefs on us if we know the difference between the truth and a belief.  The world is a mess because people think their beliefs are true.  Then they spew their beliefs on others because they think everyone needs their truth.  We already share the truth; we’re born with it.  Beliefs must remain temporary and personal.  They support, rather than dominate, creativity.

 

Action

The false self is action driven toward rigidly-defined goals. It seeks rewards and avoids punishment.  It avoids the creative process because it’s focused on end results and approval. The True Self’s ideas often look risky to the false self.  Beliefs about insecurity arise along with a lot of emotion.  If we don’t let those beliefs go, we’ll find our inspiration too difficult to follow.

The key to living from our True Self is to focus on our own mind.  The false mind is always  in other people’s business.  It believes that it gains status by mentally or physically pushing others down below it with it’s knowledge and conviction.  It fears others stealing it’s ideas; it’s competitive.  The false self judges, debates, and takes sides.  I know these things look normal; but normal people are deep in the illusion.

We must get to the place where we’re always watching our mind, discriminating, and letting go.  Eventually, it becomes automatic.  Our false self is blindly obedient.  It will be obedient to others unless we retrain it to be obedient to our True Self.

Yea, when we live this way, we’ll look lazy, unmotivated, or too happy.  Others will think we’re playing too much.  That’s their problem.  Finding our True Self and expressing it is what we all really want.  It’s finding the kingdom of heaven and eating from the Tree of Life again.

Motivation — Inner or Outer?

By Cathy Eck

 

How to Motivate Others

Until 1997, I owned a technology business.  I learned so many lessons from running that business — I’m incredibly grateful for the experience.  But one of the problems that really dumbfounded me was motivation.  I had employees and clients that were clearly internally motivated.  I only had to give them a little direction, and they were off and running.  On the other hand, I had employees and clients that didn’t make a move without external motivation.  Then I had to figure out what it was that motivated them  — money, time off, approval, or fear.

Wanting to understand motivation led me to enroll in a Master’s Degree Program in Transpersonal Psychology.  I thought perhaps more education would answer my burning question.  It didn’t.  But that school got me to the amazing library that was crucial for the research that I would do in the future.

I loved that school so much.  I realized that school could be a place of freedom and joy.  There were no tests; our teachers graded our speeches, papers, and projects.  There was no memorization; our grades were based on our ability to dig into something and see it with fresh eyes.  I was a duck in water and completely inner motivated.  That prepared me for what would happen next.

 

Free At Last

In 1999, my children decided that they wanted to unschool.  Unschool means learning outside of a school — it isn’t anti-education.  We’d moved to the country and visited all the available schools.  They didn’t like any of them.  A book had come to our attention called “Free at Last,” by Daniel Greenberg, a man who inspires me to this day.  He realized that children have internal motivation until we teach them external motivation.  In his school, “The Sudbury Valley School,” the children aren’t taught anything until they ask to learn it.  Sometimes they go for years without asking; but when they do finally ask, they learn at incredible speed because they’re motivated — one student learned six years of math in six weeks.  Obviously, these children also have enormous time to ponder life, explore passions, and just get to know who they are.

We decided to model Sudbury Valley at home.  My two younger children dove right in.  I could see what Daniel was saying.  When they didn’t want to learn something, it was impossible to teach them without force.  I realized why schools need so much discipline, rules, shame, and fear of disapproval to get kids to learn outside of their natural learning cycle.

My oldest son had been in a private school until the sixth grade.  He was already institutionalized.  He begged me to please tell him what to learn.  He couldn’t think for himself.  He couldn’t find his inner motivation.  It took about two years to decondition him, then he remembered his natural desire to learn.

 

My Real Lesson

I thought I wanted to learn how to motivate others.  What I really wanted to learn was how to support people in finding their inner motivation, their True Self.  I wanted to understand how I could nurture inner motivation in my children and myself.

To get to inner motivation, one must strip away all the external motivation.  We have to stop wanting what others have; and look at what really lights our fire.  Our True Self is the source of internal motivation, and it rarely pleases other people’s agendas.  It can look quite unsocial and rude when it simply doesn’t buy the beliefs of other people or join popular groups.  It knows what it needs, and it’s bored or uninterested in anything that it doesn’t need.

 

A few differences

The True Self is motivated by win-win; the false self is motivated by win-lose.

The True Self is what it is; the false self wants to fit in and be accepted.

The True Self is self-reliant; the false self wants support from others because beliefs have no power without attention.

The True Self is unique; the false self is a good clone.

The True Self leads; the false self follows and obeys.

The True Self enjoys the journey; the false self enjoys only the result.

The True Self loves to give its gifts; the false self loves to get rewarded.

The True Self has no fear and doesn’t see risk; the false self is fueled by beliefs and their related emotions.

The True Self does what feels calm and good; the false self does what relieves its emotions and satisfies its beliefs.

The True Self thinks about creating; the false self thinks about profits or marketing.

The True Self learns for fun and expansion; the false self memorizes and repeats.

The True Self loves when another succeeds; the false self is jealous or envious of others.

The True Self is motivated from the heart; the false self is motivated from the head.

The True Self is motivated from within; the false self is motivated from without.

The True Self is Daniel Greenberg; the false self is Bill O’Reilly.

 

Living From Inner Motivation

Most teachers simply offer more beliefs to stuff into our already clogged minds.  There are only a few Daniel Greenberg’s in the world that offer a space for the True Self to expand, explore, and invent.

My favorite Daniel story was about a kid who only wanted to fish.  He fished every day for years — no motivation for anything else.  His father wanted to take him out of the school.  He wasn’t learning anything.  Daniel calmed the father and said, “That child knows everything about fishing.  When he finds something else that motivates him that completely, he’ll excel at it.”  Eventually that child found computers.  After graduation, he founded a technology company.  Two years later, he had twenty employees.  He learned the thing that almost no one learns in school.  He learned how to learn, effortlessly and on his own.  And, most important, he learned how to follow his heart and live from inner motivation.

 

 

Inspiration vs Motivation: Initiation 102

The further you are from the center, the wilder the ride

By Cathy Eck 

 

Inspiration or Motivation

I became possessed by this topic nearly thirty years ago as a business owner.  Some rare employees loved their work and needed no motivation to do a stellar job.  Most did their jobs well but did better with incentives, and some couldn’t be moved with a forklift.  They were apathetic and had no motivation.  All problems came from the last group.

My curiosity prompted me to  enroll in a Master’s Degree program in Transpersonal Psychology (because I still thought the answers were outside of me).  I wanted to help this last group and eliminate our problems; but I also wanted to make sure that my children fell into the first group.  I realized that those who required no external motivation lived from the inside out — from inspiration.  The inspired ones were the happy ones.

Most of the world lives from the outside in.  Something good happens, and they are happy.  Something bad happens, and they are sad.  They are emotionally tossed about by the world, never able to stay happy for long unless they micro-manage their life.

I first noticed this watching my mother and her supposed love for football.  When her team won, life was good.  When her team lost, I wished I lived on another planet.    As a young child, I couldn’t understand how a football team could affect her moods in such a profound way.  Enjoying football is great; letting football ruin your day or week is insanity.  I wanted my dad to get her therapy, but my dad said she was normal.  “Normal, my ass,”  I thought.  The seed to understand the link between thoughts and emotions was probably planted in my childhood family room.

 

What About Passion?

My mother would have said that she was passionate about football and her team.  She was inspired to watch football, and she almost sounded reasonable.  But I later learned that inspiration doesn’t drag your ass around and make you crazy.

Even the best of psychology looks outside for the cause, so it is doubtful that therapy would have helped my mother.  They would have told her to pick a better team.

If people are out of work, it’s the economy’s fault.  If they are sick, germs, toxins, or an unhealthy lifestyle caused it.  Wars are caused by terrorists.  But the real insanity is that people go to speakers or clergy to get motivated or inspired.  No one says to themselves, “Gee, this might be backwards” because we are trained so well to think this way.  And don’t even get me started on the notion that God is outside of us handing out rewards and punishments like Santa Claus.

We are all born inspired.  Children don’t need motivation to learn to crawl or walk.  Plants don’t need motivation to pop out of the soil.  We are hard-wired for growth and exploration.  Inspiration handles life nicely until humans tell us to do what they want us to do; then we need motivation.  My conclusion, with my third group of apathetic employees was simply that they were in the wrong career.  I did them a favor; I fired them.

 

Initiation Reverses Our Direction

The initiates said that everything has a cause, and the cause is always in our own mind.  Even the person who just cut you off on the freeway couldn’t have done it without a belief in your mind (which might appear to be unconscious) that allowed him or her into your world.  This is why abusers groom their prey; they have to insert a belief in their prey’s mind for the abuse to occur.

There is always a causal belief for anything in our life.  It sounds crazy when you’ve never heard that before, and it is painful to go down this alley because we feel so responsible. We have to remember that we borrowed the beliefs that got us into this mess from others because we came to this earth as innocent children without discrimination. We didn’t do anything wrong.  At the same time, once we know better; we need to reverse the damage.

When I finally understood this, I found it sort of funny because I realized that in the beginning, it must have been extremely hard to get people not to follow their inspiration.  As I’ve worked on my own mind, I’ve seen tricks, traps, and blind spots indicating that our history was filled with instances of the collective false mind nearly losing to the True Self.  So the gamemasters had to install a patch in the software.  They had to invent yet another religion or create a new dictator or rewrite history in some bizzaar way to make sure that we didn’t figure out that we are powerful, unlimited beings who don’t have to do what they want us to do.  The elite, rich, and powerful of the world are nothing without the slaves that do their work for them.  When you realize that, you lose your motivation do serve them.

Quite frankly,  initiation would take an hour or a day if we didn’t have so much training in living from motivation.  Everyone is looking for answers out there, when the answers are inside of them.  It is the ultimate mental trick.  As we let go of beliefs, our focus moves inward to the center where life is calm and consistent.  When a wheel turns, if you are on the rim, you get a wild ride; but if you stand right in the center, you barely move at all.

Thus, initiates were described as calm, peaceful, and wise.  They didn’t display emotions.  But this wasn’t because they had slick poker-faced personalities.  They had no emotions because they had no beliefs.  They simply weren’t being tossed and turned by the chaos of the world.  They created their lives from the inside out, and lived from the center of the wheel.

 

Santa or Satan, same letters, and both are embedded in the illusion of Santa.