Who Am I? I’m A Creator, A Free Thinker…

 Who am I?

By Cathy Eck

 

Who Am I?

This is my last post for awhile.  I assure you that everything you need to get freedom is on this site and Gateway to Gold.  Reread old posts; what you perceive changes as you let go.  Challenge your thoughts/beliefs, even if your mind is telling you with absolute certainty that what you’re experiencing or thinking is true.  As you let go, you’ll answer life’s biggest question, “Who Am I?”

You didn’t arrive on earth wondering who you were.  You were curious and alive…a True Self.  You saw someone walking, you watched them, you took the risk, and you walked.  You heard people talk, and you learned to speak and matched words to objects, people, and experiences.  Learning and life were fun.

Recently, I heard on television that children’s brains are completely fired up until they start answering the question “I am…?”  They start creating a false identity, labeling themselves; and their brain appears to shut down.  Of course, we’re reversing that.

 

WTF?

People taught you to see what they saw.  You learned there was danger, suffering, problems, and disease.  You could get hurt, or you could hurt someone.  You learned to judge and compare.  This didn’t make sense, but you figured that those who came before you must know the truth.

You were given the knowledge of good and evil (the shit that caused us to fall).  Good now had an opposite…EVIL.  You learned to hate and fear other humans.

We see what we hold in mind…what we believe.  How do we get back to who we once were?   It seems impossible.  Their beliefs appeared to get stuck in our minds.  How did that happen?  We asked, and they answered.

“You were born sinful.  Your memories of perfection are imaginary…visions of heaven.  Go to church to make sure you get to heaven when you die.”  What a crock of shit!

Your character was slowly constructed.  You learned to be good and worthy so you could get a good-paying role in society and work hard.  “Life isn’t meant to be easy,” they say.

Knowledge consumed your mind.  Those who memorized the most knowledge got the best roles.  They’re called experts.  Creative thinkers sound strange.  Philosophers look lazy.  Artists starve.  Inventors can’t afford to create their inventions unless they please “The Man.”

Your pure thinking and true goodness was replaced by an illusion built of beliefs in which you were judged on your ability to blindly follow.  When you got to the point where you feared judgment enough, you turned away from your True Self.

A True Self is labeled evil by false selves.  The false self believes that creativity is for people with nothing else to do.  No one can see your thoughts anyway; it’s what you do that counts.  You conformed, but then you wondered, “Who Am I?”

 

Had Enough?

Maybe you attended workshops, saw therapists, and did processes and practices; yet you didn’t find the answer.  One day, you learned how to let go.  You let go of your beliefs regarding social protocol, religion, disease, problems, culture, and sin.  You released society’s rules from your mind.  You realized that others, even experts, had nothing to offer.  Slowly…you started to remember,  “I’m a creator.  What I think is what I become.”  

Your problems came from accepting beliefs and then fixing the effects of those beliefs.  You finally knew which way to go.

 

TRUE and FALSE

The illusion runs on good/evil, right/wrong, or win/lose.  The illusion is false…powerless.  It’s believed by nearly everyone…but it isn’t real.  It’s projected from our collective beliefs.  You arrived with the truth, and you didn’t lose it.  You can’t screw up letting go.  You can’t let go of truth.

 

EMOTIONS MEAN FALSE

Any thought/belief that has an emotional component is false, even if the whole world believes it’s true.  Your mind desperately wants you to believe that thoughts that feel bad are true, but you fight that temptation.  You let those thoughts go.

 

WIN-WIN

Holy Shit!  You aren’t a fucking sinner.  The more you let go, the more you despise competition, oppression, and domination.  You’d never harm another.  You won’t even judge another anymore.  You realize that a true thought is win-win for everyone.  No belief system can be true.  Belief systems separate us.

 

MASCULINE AND FEMININE ROLES

You realize that those who have masculine (authority) roles make the rules.  The judging God was actually a human being…a false, power-tripping leader who imposed his illusion, where he wins and we lose, on everyone else in the name of God.  You don’t want to even play good roles in the illusion — they always harm someone.

 

PROJECTION

Leaders in false masculine roles often look like True Selves because they project their judgments and the unwanted half of their beliefs on to people in feminine roles.  You now see and hear the false masculine’s incongruence.  The leaders see enemies, evil, suffering, poverty, and disease because it’s inside of them.  It’s not true; it’s their illusion…their reality.  Underneath their mask is a powerless human who’s lost.  They’re pawns of the illusion fixing their own projections.  We should ignore them, not follow them.

 

PHYSICAL VS. MENTAL PERSPECTIVE

We were programmed to see a physically-focused perspective of reality which blinds and confuses us. We look at the quality of people’s doing and ignore their thinking.  Sadly, false thinking looks normal.  True good comes from a pure mind.  When our mind is impure, we can look good by doing the right things; but we aren’t truly good.

 

LET IT GO

The illusion told us that it could give us what we already were.  The illusion only lies.

When we can no longer stand the illusion, we let it go.  As we let go of the judgments, labels, beliefs, and knowledge/expertise, we’re left with the truth.  We remember who we are.  We’re creators who bring our ideas to life for the benefit of everyone.  Keep letting go; don’t stop until you get to freedom.  It’s your birthright.

Dealing with Fragile Egos as Characters

fragile ego

By Cathy Eck

 

Fragile Egos

When someone holds their beliefs as absolutely true, they become a “fragile ego.” Fragile egos exist at all levels of society.  We have to let them break to get free.

Fragile egos send a clear message:  “If you obey me, I’ll reward you.  If you disobey, I’ll punish.”  They’re clones of the Old Testament false God (imaginary leader of the illusion) who believe they’re good people with the right to judge and punish.

Whoever disagrees with them is evil or bad.  Their biggest fear is exposure.  They lie and impose their beliefs on others in order to look powerful while hiding their belief that they’re weak.

The most dangerous fragile egos wear a nice mask causing them to look like a True Self.  They say and do what the illusion considers good; they generally look happy and calm.  They believe that what you do, not how you think, makes you good.  Good, by their definition gets rewarded.  That’s how the illusion works.

But the true world doesn’t work that way.  Rules and projection don’t exist outside the illusion, we manifest what we believe.

Underneath the fragile ego’s mask is an emotional storm; their actions aren’t congruent with their thinking.  They’re filled with rules and beliefs.  When we disobey or say, “No,” to their demands, their emotions roar.  They don’t see their OWN thinking as the cause of their emotions.  They blame the feminine role because their Adam-and-Eve based mythology gave them the right to.

The fragile ego projects their responsibility and emotions outward.  In fact, when we’re conditioned by fragile egos, we often become overly responsible.  We take responsibility for their emotions because they claim we’re the cause.  We aren’t.

 

The Wall

In mentoring, I call the eruption of the fragile ego, “hitting the wall.”  Letting go looks impossible.  Strong religious, scientific, or political views look absolutely true.  Arguing with the fragile ego does no good.  The fragile ego repeats its knowledge, rules, and beliefs like a robot.  It sees evidence that supports its thinking; it’s sure it’s right.

We only see evidence because we believe the cause.  We hold a really strong belief, but it’s still false.  If we let go of the causal belief, we’ll see different evidence.  When we try to challenge fragile ego beliefs in ourselves or others, psychological reversals kick in.  The thoughts clearly generate emotion, they’re not win-win, and they’re taking us away from freedom; but we can’t remember that the emotion means false.  Until we routinely catch this in ourselves, we won’t catch it in others.

 

They’re Characters

Our OWN fragile ego consists of voice recordings acquired from others who forced their beliefs into our mind.  We did feel emotions when we first heard their words; but we were afraid to challenge them.  Their words are NOW constantly squatting in our mind.

After letting go for awhile, we do come to know that the recordings are false.  And yet, people tell me that the fragile ego is still running their life.   They still behave as the fragile ego would want them to behave or say what the fragile ego would consider socially or politically correct.  They still can’t be themselves.

 

An Exercise

Imagine yourself in the center of your mind; see the fragile egos who have limited your life with beliefs, rules, and knowledge in the periphery of a giant circle looking at you.  They’re keeping you from leaving the circle.

Review old memories in your mind. Bring up fragile ego encounters from the past. Let the fragile ego characters slowly replay the scene.  Discriminate and let go as they talk.  Also let go of any judgments or reasoning that arises in your mind about these characters. Judgment on your part keeps you stuck to them.  You might never see them again; but when you clean up their character in your own mind, you won’t meet that same sort of person again.  Of if you do, you’ll stay powerful.

You can take this even further.  We tend to think that we must change the real life fragile ego characters or get them to stop judging us.  But many of them will never change or stop judging.  Are you going to wait until they change to live your life?  I hope not.

Step into their character within your own mind.  Speak their beliefs, and feel their emotions arise when they speak something false or judgmental.  Assume they can discriminate and let go, and do so.  It’s your mind!  These are your characters! You have the power to clean up their words in your mind.  In this way, we change the past.

See if this fragile ego still has power over you.  If so, ask yourself, “Why?”  Let go of the reasons that your mind gives you.  Clean up more memories.

You aren’t affecting the real life person in any way — good or bad.  When your mind is clear, they won’t bother you.  Their beliefs will only affect them.

Our false minds were meant to be creative containers, separate and distinct from others people’s minds, so we could all create independently.  We’ve never had the right to impose our beliefs on others.  We only do it because others did it to us.

When you realize that you don’t deserve their judgment, they don’t have power over you anymore.  When you understand that their rules are false, they don’t apply to you.  If they say that you’re hurting them, you don’t take it in.  In fact, I’ll often say to fragile egos, “You’re telling me what I should believe; how can I be hurting you?”

Fragile egos can be difficult.  But we can get through that wall if we take our rock hammer and chip away one belief or memory at a time.  Eventually, we’ll break through their highly tinted glass.  We’ll escape their influence without fighting them.  When we clean our OWN mind, they lose their false power.  They can’t harm us anymore.

 

Eliminating Roles — A Shortcut to Freedom

Masks we wear

By Cathy Eck

 

We’re All Actors

One of my greatest ah-ha moments came while listening to an interview of Forest Whitaker after his incredible performance in the “Last King of Scotland.”   Forest played the brutal Ugandan dictator, Idi Amin; and he really owned the character.  My insight came when he said that it took him three months to shed that role and get back to being himself.

Wait a minute, three months?  It took him only three months to shed Idi Amin and get back to himself?  Idi Amin had enough baggage to keep a million people busy letting go for years.

Why do people believe that letting go takes forever?  Shit, people in the east think it takes lifetimes.  They sit in the forest or a cave for decades, and they still don’t come out themselves.  If Whitaker can let go of Idi Amin in only three months, why can’t I let my roles go in three days?  After all, I’m clearly no Idi Amin.

The answer was very clear.  Forest Whitaker knows that he isn’t Idi Amin.  You and I, however, often believe that we’re the roles we play.  We often can’t tell if a belief that we carry in mind is true or false until we let it go.

Often we don’t know that a belief lives in our unconscious until a person or event exposes it.  Most people can’t tell the difference between their pleasant mask and their True Self so they don’t let go.  But we can’t let go of our True Self — letting go never causes a problem.  Freedom requires letting go of our entire false self — to return to a blank slate so we can write and direct the life script that we desire.

 

Roles that Bind Us

We’ve all believed and accepted many roles throughout life.  Roles can be fun if they’re temporary; ask any actor.  But when a role becomes permanent, it can be hell.  Roles can define us and keep us stuck.  We live as if we have a prominently displayed sign on our chest exposing our label.  People sense that label and treat us accordingly.

In addition, we’ve been trained to believe that we can’t let go of a role that another assigned to us, especially if that person was an authority.  It feels like they need to free us.

Relationships make stepping out of roles difficult because people think we’re insane when we let go of a belief that they still believe to be true.  Their reality proves them right, and people in the illusion confuse reality with truth.  They don’t realize that we’re not excluding them; and they can still believe whatever they want about their life.  No one has the right to tell another what to believe.  But relationships often form around common beliefs.  People think that we’re letting them go when we’re just letting go of a belief.

Some people expect us to show up in our mask; and if their expectation is very strong or if we are a people pleaser, it reinforces our role.

Letting go of a physical or mental diagnosis can be nearly impossible if the people in our life believe our label and treat us as having that label.  Healing is often much easier when you simply remove yourself from those who label you.

 

Living Without Roles

Imagine if you knew you were acting?  After all, you are.  If you’re being yourself, you wouldn’t play a permanent role, especially one you didn’t like.  You’d play a role and drop it when you had enough.  You’d drop it easily because you’d know you weren’t the role.

Dropping roles means dropping lots of beliefs at one time.  When we accept a label or role, we accept all the beliefs that are part of that acting engagement.   A great actor will study the character and adopt his or her state of mind.  Once the state of mind is accepted, the part flows naturally.  They appear to become the character by wearing the character’s mask.  But they drop the mask when it isn’t useful any longer.  If we’re resisting dropping our mask, it’s wise to see if it has a payoff.  If we let go of the payoff, the mask should come off more easily.

When we drop any label or role, we create a massive amount of space for our True Self to fill.  Ideally, we’d just be our Self and everything would be perfect.  But our world is in transition.  If we’re uncomfortable dropping the entire role, then we can just drop some of the beliefs that make up that role.  We can show up at mom’s, play the daughter or son role she assigns while witnessing our act and maintaining our sense of Self; then we can drop the beliefs that bothered us most.  Each time we visit, we can let go of the beliefs that arise and incorporate a little more of our True Self.  We can also let go of any belief in our mind that she can’t handle the shift and then let the cards fall where they may.

I used to feel guilty dropping roles, as if they were some sort of contract that I agreed to for life.  But they aren’t contracts; we do everyone a favor when we just be ourselves (although it might take them some time to realize that).

Too many people keep playing old outdated roles because they don’t have another way to be with people they love.  They don’t want to lose the person so they accept the role and resent every minute of it.  Conscious role playing is a temporary bridge to a new way of relating.

Letting go of labels and roles is the fast track to freedom.  It takes courage to drop roles completely.  And, as you can see by the example of Forest Whitaker, it takes knowing clearly who you are not and being willing to let that character go.

Storytelling or History: What’s the Difference?

Footprints in the Sand

By Cathy Eck

 

Storytelling Versus History

I enjoy stories very much.  I love to read them, to write them, and to watch them on the big screen.  But I don’t like history at all.  History is usually presented by the winners; it’s masculine-dominant (his story, not her story) and fact driven, not character driven.  In short, it’s food for the intellect, the false self.

The difference between storytelling and history has become blurred in people’s minds because our educational systems emphasize history over storytelling.  We can learn a lot by studying the difference between storytelling and history.

If we want to write a story, we first develop characters and maybe a plot or a story idea.  We give the characters a false-self perspective, including a back story, preferences, and beliefs.  Then we turn the characters loose and let them interact.  If the characters don’t like the results they’re getting, they’ll hopefully have a change of mind.  If the characters don’t change their mind, the story eventually becomes predictable and boring.  If the characters don’t grow, viewers will stop feeling sympathy for their troubles.

We see these things clearly on the big screen, but often ignore them in our own lives.  Suffering isn’t natural; it’s the consequence of being unwilling to expand our perspective and grow.  Suffering comes from holding on to what we no longer need.  Mental hoarding, just like physical hoarding, is destructive.

 

Life is Storytelling

We’re all living a potentially great story whether we know it or not.  Two decades ago, the Story of “The Legend spontaneously popped out of my unconscious.  That began my exploration into the nature of storytelling.  I could see that “The Legend” was like an undercurrent in my life.  Fairy tales, myths, and religious stories sit in our unconscious as causal forces in our life.  This is why religions and cultures are built on a foundation of storytelling.  We’re controlled by the stories we hold in mind as true.  If we share a common foundation of story with another, we’ll have similar beliefs and see the world through homogeneous eyes.

Modern video games take storytelling to a new level.  I used to watch my children play them, moving from level to level.  If their character screwed up, they’d say, “Oh, I died.”  They’d restart the game.  I felt as though I was watching a miniature version of life.  You either make it to the next level in your storyline, or you die.  The difference is that the gamer realizes he’s responsible for his fate.

 

His Story

History is literal.  There’s no room for individuality or interpretation.  It’s simply the reporting of facts — names, dates, and physical events.  History is always one-sided; usually the winners write history.  As we’ve become more left-brained or intellectual, we’ve forgotten the cause and effect relationship in life.  We fail to consider that every event has a belief-related cause behind it.  We accept the winner’s false-self projection that their enemy is evil and deserving of punishment.

Today, people share their personal stories in historical form.  They think they’re storytelling, but they aren’t.  Great stories allow for change; and great storytellers allow their characters to transform.  People have labeled the oldest stories mythology because they find so many versions of the old stories.  Old stories changed as the characters changed.  History put an end to that; history keeps us stuck within a false, collective mindset.

 

The Key

The true storyteller knew that he created every single character, even the evil ones.  The historian only identifies with one character — the one they label good or right.  

The historian acts as if he or she is either a hero or victim.  They’re telling the story to get sympathy, attention, or approval.  If they get such rewards, they’ll continue to tell the story to keep it alive.

Often we get stuck in another person’s story; we feel like we can’t get free.  We feel bad if we expose another as cause in their drama because we’ve been trained to feel guilty for revealing the cause of history.  We aren’t supposed to point out that the Emperor is naked.

 

Freedom

Freedom requires owning all the characters in our story and seeing that they fit together like a puzzle.  The victim and perpetrator/hero are opposites who have divided thought in the same way (see the triangle process); and the evil that the hero fights is simply his or her shadow.

The psychologist Fritz Perls popularized Gestalt therapy.  Perls studied people’s dreams.  He required them to see themselves as every character and even every essential item in the dream.  In this way, they could step back and see their whole mind; they could see themselves as cause.  When we see our whole mind, we see the mental cause of our problems.  Then we can change our mind more easily.

 

We’re All Storytelling

Many have said that we’re all storytelling.  We invent a story; then ideally we direct, produce, and star in it.  But when we don’t own our mind, we just play a walk-on part in someone else’s drama.  When we follow the false mind (which we acquired from others) over our heart (True Self), our own story remains unlived and untold.  We don’t grow or change.  Life becomes boring, and we feel without purpose.

This happens when we accept masculine and feminine roles; and we place ourselves in a feminine role to another.  Dropping roles that don’t bring us joy is key to returning to our own original story.

Screenwriters say that the audience wants an inciting incident (usually a fall of sorts) in the first ten minutes.  From the perspective of story, we plan our fall into the illusion.  You probably lived that part of your story.  But what happened after that.  Did you learn?  Did you grow?  Did you change?  Did you let go of your “evil” shadow?  Did you love?  That’s what makes a story great.  And most important, did you get that precious and rare happily ever after?

Honesty, Reality, and the True Self

Honesty and looking in the mirror

By Cathy Eck

 

Honesty Used Ineffectively

One of the biggest problems that arises in people who want to be themselves and free their mind is they’re usually really honest people.  Often their honesty gets them in trouble when trying to let go.  This was a mind trick that nailed my ass to the wall for a long time.

Let’s say you want to lose weight.  When you look in the mirror, you see reality.  You don’t like what you see, and your false mind honestly comments on what it sees.  Positive thinkers would say to look in the mirror and say, “I’m a skinny person,” 5000 times.  But you’re an honest person; that just doesn’t work for you.  It feels like lying.  In fact, it just makes things worse.  Since you can’t lie, and your reality is in your face, you feel hopelessly screwed by your own honesty.

The problem is that your beliefs have already created too much weight.  So how do you get behind the reality to let go of the beliefs?  What you must realize is that the beliefs you currently hold in mind in this very moment are the beliefs that got you to this point.  The good news is that as you look in the mirror, you’re probably feeling emotion.  That means that the beliefs are close to the surface of your mind.  The emotion will take you to the causal belief if you follow it.

The key is to change your mental focus from what you see to what you are thinking and feeling.  In that way, you can find the cause and let it go.

Our goal is to let go of any belief about weight that isn’t true.  If we can let go of all of the beliefs that we have about food, exercise, genetics, body type, or weight in general, then we won’t be able to create too much weight anymore.

Now I realize that I’ve picked a loaded topic.  Most of us can let go of food and exercise beliefs for a long time without running out of them.  We’ve accepted a hell of a lot of them; and if we’re honest, they all feel bad.  They can also be tricky to let go because we got most of them from experts.  But if we want freedom, we have to strip the power from the experts.  Our True Self is much wiser.

 

The Process

As we look in the mirror and see too much weight, we can feel the emotion arising.  Our honesty is dying to express itself.  If we’ve hung out in the new thought movement, we’ll want to put whipped cream on our honesty.  But don’t do it.  Whatever our mind is saying is just a belief; we don’t have to hide it or fear it because we can let it go.  This is really facing our fears.  Instead of decorating them, stuffing ourselves with some cake, turning on the television, or whining to a friend, we feel the emotion, witness the causal thoughts as they arise, and let them all go.

Let’s say that when you looked in the mirror you said, “I’m so fat.”  That comment clearly doesn’t feel good.  But you say, “That isn’t a belief.  It’s true.  I am fat.”  And therein lies the problem. Focusing on reality or labeling it solidifies the belief even more.  It makes it even harder to create change.

 

Honesty is Your Ally

Most people say, “You must deny what you see.  Cancel, cancel.”  That’s just fixing the illusion, and the illusion will come back later on.  We must remove the illusion to eliminate the problem completely.

We succeed if we turn our honesty on our mind.  This is what allows the situation to change.  Our biggest mental downfall, that perpetuates all problems, is that we’re all far too focused on reality.  We talk about reality; we warn people about reality.  But reality is caused by our beliefs.  Reality isn’t the truth.  Remember reality is our True Self, plus our beliefs.

We must stop commenting on what we SEE in the mirror; instead, we turn our ally of honesty on our mind.  Our mind says, “You look terrible.”  That comment clearly doesn’t feel good; so it isn’t true (meaning it isn’t who we really are).  Go into mind clean up mode.  Stay focused on the job at hand.  Our mind can continue to comment all it wants; but as it comments, we let go of every thought that doesn’t feel good.  In this way, we’ve begun the process of clearing our mind of all the beliefs that caused the excess weight.

As the beliefs go, we might spontaneously choose different food, find ourself taking up a sport, or just losing the weight without any action at all.  Our True Self will inspire us if any action is necessary for us.

 

The Goal of Life

The goal of life is not to prove reality right.  Anyone can do that.  The goal of life is to return to our True Self.  To do that, we must let reality know that we know it’s false.

This is the hardest switch for people to make in freeing their minds.  Almost no one does it.  It’s especially difficult when it comes to our body, our finances, or world events.  It drives us insane in relationships where we let go, and the other person keeps reminding us of reality.  But that’s why initiation isn’t for wimps.

Our false self thinks that we have to fix reality.  But reality is an illusion.  It makes no sense to fix a false illusion.  Eventually, one incredibly wonderful day, we no longer hold any beliefs in our mind.  Then reality and the truth are the same thing.

So be honest about what you are thinking, not what you see.  Be hard core in forcing your mind to drop whatever thoughts contain emotion.  Then you can turn anything around.

photo credit: jesuscm [2 weeks off] via photopin cc

Human Dream, American Dream, or Elitism?

Elitism or American Dream

By Cathy Eck

 

American Dream

Recently, people were asked, “What is the American Dream? Was their still an American Dream?”

Most people said that if you work hard, you get rewarded.  Others said that it was about having a job — any job.  Some said it was not being homeless.  The answers to the question had a pretty low threshold.  As a child, I was taught to believe that America was the land of opportunity, where dreams could come true.  But the notion that America is the land of dreams doesn’t make sense.

We’re told to think that we need outer freedom in order to have inner freedom.  That’s backwards;  inner freedom produces outer freedom.

The American Dream (or the human dream) needs serious redefining. The entire dream mentality is covered with win-lose mental vomit.  Those who have succeeded in fulfilling their dreams in the past came to hold an elitist mentality.  They felt that their accomplishment took them out of the illusion.  They got an exemption from reaping the shit that their own beliefs had sown.  They convinced us that they could pass that exemption on to their children.  And they became quite accomplished at projecting their beliefs on to others since their power caused people to believe any old thing they said.

Thus wealth, fame, or royalty carried with it an unspoken exemption from the ordinary problems of life.  It buys false power, but it doesn’t buy true freedom, peace, or joy.  The only love they get is false love and blind worship.  Lady Di did us the favor of exposing the illusion that marrying a prince is happily ever after.  Sorry Cinderella — the physical prince isn’t the answer.

 

False Freedom

Within the illusion, everyone feels powerless; what we think we want is to be heard and to have our rules followed even if they are selfish and harm others.  We want our religion to be the one.  We want our country to be the biggest and best.  We want everyone to say, “You are the ONE.”

But that’s not freedom.  Even the most powerful in the illusion are always aware that they could fall like Humpty Dumpty at any moment.  Elitism only has the power that others give it.  Strip away those worshippers, fans, and faithful followers; and they lose it all in the blink of an eye.

That’s why it often looks like there’s an elite conspiracy.  The winners want to keep their beliefs in power because that’s all the power they have.  They fear exposure more than anything else in the world.  Exposure is death to the false self.  We’re their worst enemy when we see clearly that the emperor has no clothes.

Real freedom happens when you let go of the illusion.  As you stop feeding it, it loses power.  At first it loses power over you; but then you help others; and it loses power over them.  Eventually, it loses power over lots of people; and then what happens?

Look at who loses if the guy sitting on top of the elite’s power pyramid loses the very illusion that holds him or her up.  They fall on thine ass.  Their lack of real power is exposed.  The elite have all the beliefs that you and I have.  They just top their manure with Haagen-Dazs.  As long as we give their “Your Special” beliefs power, they win.  When we stop, they lose everything that made them special.  And it might be the best thing that ever happened to them.

The reason we often resist giving up our beliefs that “they’re special” is because we’ve not yet let go of the hope that we might one day be special.  We must realize that we don’t want elite specialness because it has no true value.  Then it’s easy to let go.

 

Level Confusion

When one is an elitist, they view themselves above the trash heap of the world.  As we let go, something different happens.

Our level confusion comes undone.  At first, the illusion seems oppressive and huge.  But if we keep realizing it isn’t true, we see through the illusion.  We aren’t impressed by or afraid of false selves in power.   Our mind sees causes; and we heal the causes, not the effects.  We come into contact with those we can help, and we don’t come into contact with those we can’t help.  Life does the sorting, not our mind.

The elite no longer look powerful, strong, or brave; they look lost and powerless.  Men that used to look big and scary, look small and weak.  You can see who they’ve chosen to be.  It’s sad because you know they’re not that stupid mask, and you want to rip it off and love them.  But often, they’re afraid of losing their mask — it’s all they’ve got; and you look like an enemy if you expose them.  But if you don’t expose them, they’ll never get real freedom, joy, or love.

They aren’t evil at the core; they just don’t feel the emotions that their own thoughts are creating until you stop accepting them.  When you stand in your True Self, their false self is defeated.  They become (holy shit — I’m going to use the N word)  NORMAL.

We start by letting go of our beliefs (the ones they convinced us were true), and we become our True Selves — the place where we’re all equal and valuable.  When there is enough real people in the world, the pyramid of power will cave in and life will be fair again, borders will fall, and love will reign.

As people let go of the illusion, they get creative.  They aren’t trying to solve problems; they’re innovating something new.  They gather others of like mind or talent, and they make dreams come true.  That’s the human dream — to express our gifts and talents, to share them with the world, and to contribute in a way that’s win-win for everyone.  And that can happen anywhere — not just in America.