Working with Our Dreams and Nightmares

Dreams tell us where we are going

By Cathy Eck

 

Dreams

Dreams can be a powerful tool; they help us find causal beliefs.  But we must use our dreams in a productive way.  People generally view dreams as symbolic.  They interpret them and look for meaning in the activities, events, or items in the dream.  That can be fun; but it doesn’t help us move toward freedom.

Dreams are an unthreatening bridge that can show us what to let go from our false physically oriented interpretation of reality in order to get to our True mentally oriented perspective.  Dreams are powerful because we know we created them.  Dreams come out of our OWN mind.  We can’t blame anyone else for our dreams.  That’s key.  If we have dreams about killing, we still have an aspect of our false self that wants to kill someone or fears being killed.  If we have a demon in our dream, guess what we hold in our mind?

People make the mistake of only identifying with the main character in their dreams.  We created our dreams; so we’re the writer, the direction, and all the characters.  There’s enormous power in realizing that we invented all those characters whether we like them or not.  It’s hard to get to that level of honesty in the waking state.

If we wrote a screenplay or novel, we’d know what each character was going to say and do.  That’s how we write our dreams without effort.  For a person to write a story about stealing, they have to hold stealing in mind.  They can’t write about a bank robbery while thinking about pansies.  If we let our beliefs around such criminal behavior go after discovering them in our dreams, we don’t have to experience such things in real life.

 

How to Let Go Using Dreams?

Let’s say that you dream that you’re a student in school.  First work on yourself by asking questions.  Why am I in school?  Do I like being a student?  How do I feel about learning?  What am I learning?  Do I like it?  Get honest and speak your mind as that character.  If something you believe as that character feels bad (has emotion as you think it) let it go.  It’s a false belief.  Our false self adds drama, opposition, and bad tasting spices to our dreams and experiences.  It usually turns them from perfect, heavenly experiences into hellish nightmares.

Let’s say that you and another student got in trouble in the dream.  You’re also the other student.  Step into their character and ask yourself questions about you, the teacher, and school.  How do each of you feel about getting caught?  Why did you get caught?  What outcome do you fear as a result?  What were you thinking before and after you got caught?  These are thoughts that should have emotion — beliefs to let go as false.

Caution!  Don’t allow the answers to your questions to become reasons for why your life is the way it is.  We aren’t looking for interpretation; we’re looking for causal beliefs to let go.

You’re also the teacher in the dream.  Are you angry that students weren’t listening to you?  Do you dislike these students, judge them?  Do you like your job, hate your job?  Why?  Use your answers to find beliefs to let go.

Each character plays a role.  The teacher represents the masculine role; the students are in feminine roles.  You’ll see beliefs from both aspects of your mind in these characters.  As you step into each character, behave as if you want to let go and know how to let go.  Clean up the entire scene.

What you should discover is that without the beliefs that you held in mind before the dream, you couldn’t have had that exact dream.  That’s a valuable lesson.  The same is true of life.

Some therapists go batshit crazy and advise people to pretend they’re the desk or chair.  That’s generally not worth our time.  You might have beliefs about furniture, but furniture doesn’t have beliefs about you.

 

What you Learn

Ideally, we want to live our own True story as the writer, director, and main character.  Everyone else in our life plays a supporting character; we’re also supporting characters for them.  We want to have symbiotic, not codependent, competitive, or opposing relationships with others.

If we perceive that a story character is dominating us or has an intention to harm us in our dream, we’ll feel as if they’re writing our dream (or nightmare).  We’ve given them or someone like them the masculine leadership role for our life.  We probably feel we have to please this character so they’ll let us have what we want.  Their rules for life represent the rules we believe we must live by; they’re our false God who rewards and punishes us.

This was the original end goal of selling religious stories as the truth.  They were originally someone’s personal story.  But they wanted their story to be the story.  They wanted to rule the world instead of just being the king of their life.  Even today, you see new religions and new spiritual teachings being born; they always have a story that makes those teachings or that teacher the ONE.  People often claim to be called or special so that they can mute your story and replace it with their story.  If you follow their practices or their protocol, you’ll get to be a minion in their kingdom — a walk on character that fulfills their dreams.  You’ll NEVER get to live your life.

As you let go of beliefs, you do become the main character in your story living the script that you’ve written.  You’re day and night dreams will improve.  If you want to be completely free, your story must be win-win for everyone.  No one would be your minion, prisoner, or slave.  They’ll simply be other creators who stopped by to temporarily co-create with you and play a character in your story because it’s fun.