Human Dream, American Dream, or Elitism?

Elitism or American Dream

By Cathy Eck

 

American Dream

Recently, people were asked, “What is the American Dream? Was their still an American Dream?”

Most people said that if you work hard, you get rewarded.  Others said that it was about having a job — any job.  Some said it was not being homeless.  The answers to the question had a pretty low threshold.  As a child, I was taught to believe that America was the land of opportunity, where dreams could come true.  But the notion that America is the land of dreams doesn’t make sense.

We’re told to think that we need outer freedom in order to have inner freedom.  That’s backwards;  inner freedom produces outer freedom.

The American Dream (or the human dream) needs serious redefining. The entire dream mentality is covered with win-lose mental vomit.  Those who have succeeded in fulfilling their dreams in the past came to hold an elitist mentality.  They felt that their accomplishment took them out of the illusion.  They got an exemption from reaping the shit that their own beliefs had sown.  They convinced us that they could pass that exemption on to their children.  And they became quite accomplished at projecting their beliefs on to others since their power caused people to believe any old thing they said.

Thus wealth, fame, or royalty carried with it an unspoken exemption from the ordinary problems of life.  It buys false power, but it doesn’t buy true freedom, peace, or joy.  The only love they get is false love and blind worship.  Lady Di did us the favor of exposing the illusion that marrying a prince is happily ever after.  Sorry Cinderella — the physical prince isn’t the answer.

 

False Freedom

Within the illusion, everyone feels powerless; what we think we want is to be heard and to have our rules followed even if they are selfish and harm others.  We want our religion to be the one.  We want our country to be the biggest and best.  We want everyone to say, “You are the ONE.”

But that’s not freedom.  Even the most powerful in the illusion are always aware that they could fall like Humpty Dumpty at any moment.  Elitism only has the power that others give it.  Strip away those worshippers, fans, and faithful followers; and they lose it all in the blink of an eye.

That’s why it often looks like there’s an elite conspiracy.  The winners want to keep their beliefs in power because that’s all the power they have.  They fear exposure more than anything else in the world.  Exposure is death to the false self.  We’re their worst enemy when we see clearly that the emperor has no clothes.

Real freedom happens when you let go of the illusion.  As you stop feeding it, it loses power.  At first it loses power over you; but then you help others; and it loses power over them.  Eventually, it loses power over lots of people; and then what happens?

Look at who loses if the guy sitting on top of the elite’s power pyramid loses the very illusion that holds him or her up.  They fall on thine ass.  Their lack of real power is exposed.  The elite have all the beliefs that you and I have.  They just top their manure with Haagen-Dazs.  As long as we give their “Your Special” beliefs power, they win.  When we stop, they lose everything that made them special.  And it might be the best thing that ever happened to them.

The reason we often resist giving up our beliefs that “they’re special” is because we’ve not yet let go of the hope that we might one day be special.  We must realize that we don’t want elite specialness because it has no true value.  Then it’s easy to let go.

 

Level Confusion

When one is an elitist, they view themselves above the trash heap of the world.  As we let go, something different happens.

Our level confusion comes undone.  At first, the illusion seems oppressive and huge.  But if we keep realizing it isn’t true, we see through the illusion.  We aren’t impressed by or afraid of false selves in power.   Our mind sees causes; and we heal the causes, not the effects.  We come into contact with those we can help, and we don’t come into contact with those we can’t help.  Life does the sorting, not our mind.

The elite no longer look powerful, strong, or brave; they look lost and powerless.  Men that used to look big and scary, look small and weak.  You can see who they’ve chosen to be.  It’s sad because you know they’re not that stupid mask, and you want to rip it off and love them.  But often, they’re afraid of losing their mask — it’s all they’ve got; and you look like an enemy if you expose them.  But if you don’t expose them, they’ll never get real freedom, joy, or love.

They aren’t evil at the core; they just don’t feel the emotions that their own thoughts are creating until you stop accepting them.  When you stand in your True Self, their false self is defeated.  They become (holy shit — I’m going to use the N word)  NORMAL.

We start by letting go of our beliefs (the ones they convinced us were true), and we become our True Selves — the place where we’re all equal and valuable.  When there is enough real people in the world, the pyramid of power will cave in and life will be fair again, borders will fall, and love will reign.

As people let go of the illusion, they get creative.  They aren’t trying to solve problems; they’re innovating something new.  They gather others of like mind or talent, and they make dreams come true.  That’s the human dream — to express our gifts and talents, to share them with the world, and to contribute in a way that’s win-win for everyone.  And that can happen anywhere — not just in America.

 

Fire, Passion, and Desire

Calaveras Big Tree National Park

By Cathy Eck

 

Calaveras Big Trees National Park

I recently took a day trip to Calaveras Big Trees National park in California.  The park is home to some of the remaining giant sequoias — the world’s largest trees.  These trees are so amazing.  When you’re underneath them, you feel the same calmness that you feel from a wise elder.  The largest sequoia is 275 feet tall and 36.5 feet in diameter.  The oldest tree lived for 3200 years.

The most enlightening fact that I learned about the Big Trees was that they need exposure to fire at certain times in their life cycle in order to thrive.  Before humans arrived, fires were started, mostly by lightning; those fires might burn uninterrupted for months at a time.  The first people to arrive in this area, over 12,000 years ago, understood this cycle; they adapted to it.  They realized that the fire improved their own food supply, gave them better materials, and opened travel routes.  But modern humans build permanent houses; we obviously don’t want our houses destroyed.  So we put out the fires the giant trees need to survive.

These long-living trees aren’t harmed by the fire.  The fire burns out the competition for water and sunlight.  Without the fire, the forests become unhealthy and overcrowded.  The forest rangers are now looking for ways to create small controlled fires.  In this way, they can keep the trees alive and not destroy the nearby houses and other buildings.

 

Fire as a Symbol

Fire has always been associated with the sun for obvious reasons.  Since the ancient people viewed the sun as the perfect metaphor for God, because it gave light, warmth, and was unconditional, fire came to represent God or pure divine energy.  Fire also symbolizes the energy of passion and desire.  And it’s equated with emotions that flow outward such as anger, hatred, jealousy, and rage.  Fire is yang and assertive in nature; it’s masculine energy.

If our desires comes from our True Self, our fire is in balance; we offer our best to others and the world.  On the other hand, if we’re passionate about achieving false desires and winning at the expense of others, our fire is burning out of control.

Likewise, when beliefs fill our mind that restrict our true desires or passion, our fire can’t burn.  We drown our fire with the water of emotion.

 

The Message of Fire and the Big Trees

If the giant sequoia does thrive and live a long life, they’re among others trees; but they stand alone, independent.  Likewise, codependence, and the emotions that go with trying to please others, often restricts our own growth.  Their weeds choke out our life force.

Too often, people feel responsible for another’s emotions.  The truth is that our emotions are the feminine reflection of our own masculine mind.  When we join another in sympathy, we usually strengthen their beliefs and drown with them.  We put out our fire trying to put out their fire.  In truth, they just might need a long-burning fire to destroy their weeds.

If we’re emotional or overly sensitive, it’s time to look very hard at our desires or trim back our beliefs.  Sadly, some religions and philosophies prescribe just the opposite.  They tell people to trim their desires and believe their beliefs.  In this way, they pour water on our fire.

 

Level Confusion

The metaphor of the giant sequoia trees is ripe for level confusion.  The typically physically-focused person would look at the sequoia’s need for fire and relate it to people.  They’d say, “Yes, this is a message that when population is too big, we suffocate each other.”  They’d take it as proof for the survival-of-the-fittest theory.  They’d suggest getting rid of the little people so the big ones can thrive.  They’d even condemn people for building permanent homes.

Symbolism is harmful and ineffective when it is interpreted at the purely physical level. It causes people to see others as the problem.  Then the problem can’t be solved.  Symbolism unites only when we apply it to our minds.

Symbols, just like emotions, always point inward.  They show us what to let go, not where to go or what to do.  For the trees to grow very old and very large, they need the support of fire.  If their life force (fire energy) is strong, they’re not consumed by the fire, they’re nourished by it.  Mythology often talks about disasters destroying people and places.  But it also talks about the connected ones (who had the fire of God within) and knew what was coming.  They either had the power to endure it or the foresight to move out of the way.  When we don’t have pure inner fire, we can’t endure the outer fire.  Our beliefs or weeds steal too much of our life force.

Fire is assertive.  When our fire is from the True Self, we’re a contribution to the earth.  We give more than we take.   Our unconditional True Self burns away the beliefs that keep people sick, suffering, or enslaved.  The giant sequoia isn’t suffering or sacrificing as it grows; it is just doing what comes naturally.  It’s inspired from within so nature removes what could harm it from without.

Weeds (or beliefs) take far more than they give.  They keep us from reaching our true potential.  Beliefs block our true fire, our real power.  Like the weeds, they take all the nutrients and give nothing back.  When they arise, with their powerful flood of emotion, we must face them, not fear them.  We must let them know that they are false, and they have no power.  Each time we do that, we are purified by the fire of truth and wisdom.  One day, we’re the tallest tree in the forest — not by force of will but by force of nature.

 

 

What is My Passion?

Ruins of Ephesus

The ruins of Ephesus

By Cathy Eck

 

What’s My Passion?

Lots of books and workshops promise to help us find our passion.  But ultimately there’s a flaw in the very question, “What’s my passion?”  If we have to ask, we’re in our false self.  If our false self hijacks our passion and clones it, we can get really stuck in the illusion.

Many people who appear to have great passion aren’t really authentic.  They’re actually more enthusiastic or excited than passionate.   Some have bought into the idea of “find your passion and get rich.”  The True Self sees it more like “find your true expression and your perfect abundance will come.”  Fear that we might “sell our soul” causes us to keep our True Self hidden until we let go of enough beliefs to assure that our false self won’t steal our dream and ride it for riches or rewards.

 

The Word Passion

We can see the problem by looking at the definition of the word passion.  The first definition is “strong and barely controllable emotion.”  Strong, barely controllable emotion signals a big, fat belief.  The True Self state is calm and peaceful.  It’s the false self that generates strong, uncontrollable emotions.

Passion is often linked with enthusiasm, which traces back to “Greek enthousiasmos, from enthous ‘possessed by a god, inspired.'”  But we have to ask ourselves which God are we possessed by?  The word God has two meanings.  One relates to ancestors or those who came before us.  Ancestors had beliefs and human baggage.  The other definition relates to the all-loving creator God — perfect and void of beliefs.

Pure enthusiasm is calm and inspired; it harms no one.  What most call enthusiasm is actually excitement — hyped up emotion.  When we’re excited, we’re thinking the positive side of a dual thought.  We’re ignoring the opposing twin shadow thought that’s generating the strong, uncontrollable emotional to warn us to stop and let go.  We mistakenly believe the emotion is telling us to charge forward.  Following excitement gets us in big trouble.

The last meaning of passion is connected with the passion of the Christ.  This sort of passion means suffering and death.  If you hold a strong religious perspective, there’s no way in hell that you’re going to allow yourself to find your passion.  Your false self thinks you’ll die.  Good trick huh!

 

Passion as the True Self

If we take the true meaning of Christ, annointed one or initiated one, and add that to the creative, all-loving principal of God, we get a perfect definition of the True Self.  When we live from our True Self, we think pure thoughts and find that whatever we do has a joyful quality to it.  If we have a particular focus that we enjoy, we’ll do it more easily and skillfully because our True Self is leading.  We can even do something that isn’t our thing from our True Self and bring ourself so fully into that activity that we enjoy it.  Now we’re living and breathing pure creative expression every minute of our life.

Oddly, when I’m in that state, I feel that passion is the right word.  It seems that passion fell along with religion.  At one time, people knew that passion wasn’t something you conjured by getting excited about a goal, money, winning, or power.  Passion wasn’t related to suffering or death.  Passion was bringing an idea out of the oneness into the creative palette of the material world — True Self expression.

The initiates understood that hanging on the cross was code for the final initiation test where one became completely feminine to the world so they could see what was left of their masculine false self.  It was an extraordinary feat that required letting go of anything and everything that came their way.  When the false self was gone, they were resurrected — their True Self — living completely in a state of passion.

 

My Own Experience with Passion

When I was about four, I picked up my mother’s Bible and said, “This book is confusing and no one understands it.  I’m going to fix it when I’m big.”  I couldn’t even read the damn thing, but some part of me had the big picture of my life.  I also spent all my time drawing and making things; and I said that I never wanted to do anything else.  I wanted to create stuff.

Then I went off and got lost in the false world.  I didn’t draw or create anymore.  I was as confused by the Bible as everyone else.  But slowly, I remembered how to let go; and the desires and wisdom of my True Self returned.  I’m now doing exactly what I said I would do at four.

I couldn’t have found my True Self with exercises or well-crafted questionnaires.  I needed to let go of the beliefs that veiled my eyes (the false voices in my mind) so I could think clearly and see my path.

Jesus said, “Find ye first the kingdom of heaven, and all else will be added unto you.”  He also said, “Be like little children.”  He was telling us to be our True Self — like we were as children, before falling into the illusion.

The painting above is my latest creative project.  It’s part of the remaining facade  of the library of Ephesus.  Revelations says that the church of Ephesus was a strong church that had patiently borne adversity and couldn’t stand evil.  Their calling (or passion) was to remember their first love.

When we can no longer tolerate the illusion, we choose initiation.  We feel called to be courageous in letting go so that we can find our passion, our first love, our True Self.  If we stay strong and continue on the path of initiation, we eventually realize that we were never lost.  It was all a facade.  The wisdom wasn’t in the library; it was within us.