God’s Slave and Religious Extremism Exposed

God's Slave

By Cathy Eck

 

God’s Slave

I recently saw a phenomenal movie at the San Diego Jewish Film Festival called “God’s Slave.”  I doubt that it will ever get wide distribution so my commentary is going to include a spoiler alert.  It wouldn’t have ruined it for me to know the entire true story.

It seemed like a crazy coincidence to see this movie just after my father sent me some Republican propaganda, which of course explained how Muslims deserve to be hated and feared.  The writer was clearly caught in his extreme fear of terrorism.  I told my dad that I neither hated nor feared Muslims.  The discussion ended at that point.

 

Hate and Fear

Hating and fearing others actually perpetuates the illusion.  This is why Jesus said not to judge others and to love your enemy.  It’s not spiritual advice.  It’s practical.

Our false mind tells us that hating, judging, fighting, or criticizing our enemy will somehow make things right.  But that doesn’t work and never has.  When we hate or judge someone, we’re in our false masculine mind focusing on our own projection.  When we love our enemy or let go of our beliefs about our projection, it disappears.  Love and truth are the most perfect healing forces, they dissolve what’s false and leave what’s true.  You can never go wrong with unconditional love.

Fear of the false God made him into the illusion’s superstar.  Fear generates emotion; the illusion feeds off of emotion.  When people stop fearing God or fighting over who’s God is the real God, the whole thought form will dissolve.

My dad’s ridiculous email started off with a very strange line.  It said, “Muslims believe Allah, a moon God.”  Now I don’t know if Allah was originally a moon god or not, and it’s not important.  The person writing the email was Christian; Christians have a fake God too, but they think their God is true.  Jesus was considered a Sun God.  Yahweh was most likely a sky/storm God.  But calling Allah a “moon” God got me thinking.  The Muslim religion is a religion of submission — that’s a feminine quality, like the moon.  If we hate and fear anything in the feminine role, we get fear and hate back.  The feminine is reflective, like a mirror.  So how can you blame the feminine?   You can’t.  What this Christian email writer was saying, without realizing it, was that Christians have created a mean ass projection, a big enemy; and they won’t let go.  They’d rather fear, die, and fight their own reflection.  How stupid is that?  It’s real stupid, but the Christian church has been doing that for ages.

The correction to this problem is so easy.  However, this is the problem with the false masculine role.  It sees it’s reflection in the feminine role; and then blames the feminine.  It breaks the mirror when all it has to do is let go.

 

Religious Extremism

In “God’s Slave,” the main character’s parents were murdered as a young child.  He becomes a slave of the system, and they groom him to become a suicide bomber.  He’s told that the best life comes after suffering, which is not any different than the Christian notion of heaven after suffering on earth.  He’s told to go live a normal life until he’s called.  This is also no different than Christians waiting for the call.  And he’s told that being a martyr is the ultimate.  Of course, Jesus was a martyr.  So it quickly becomes apparent that Christians and Muslims share the same ridiculous beliefs.  Let go of these core beliefs, and the battle ends.  You won’t fight when you don’t believe in suffering, when you know who you are, and when you realize Jesus was an initiate, not a martyr.

Eventually, the protagonist gets the call.  By this time, he’s married and has a child who he loves very much.  He’s got a sweet, compassionate side to him.  But he’s a slave to his handler, his authority, who is a slave to the false God.

He leaves his wife and child and reports for duty.  They have no idea that he’s about to become a martyr.  He’s strapped with explosives and gets in a car filled with explosives.  He is to drive to a synagogue.  But when he reaches the synagogue, which is filled with people, he’s stopped by a young child who is standing in front of his car and won’t move.  He gets out of the car, picks up the child, and hands him to his father.  And in that compassionate, caring act, his brainwashing cracks; he remembers his own child, who is about the same age.  He remembers love; and he aborts the mission.

His handlers are going to kill him as punishment.  They say he has disappointed Allah.  He calmly replies, “No Allah didn’t ask me to kill, you did.”   That’s the realization of someone who has seen the illusion for what it is.  They realize that they’re being controlled by humans, not God.  It’s the key to freedom and the gateway to heaven on earth.

 

Life as a Movie

Each of our lives is like that movie, and we have been brainwashed by our handers to believe the movie we live in is true when it’s really just an illusion.  We’re all slaves to other humans who call us into roles.  But love and compassion cracks our programming.

Like the suicide bomber, our mind was programmed to think we’re being punished or rewarded by God.  We break free when we realize that humans are controlling us, punishing or rewarding us — not God.  We aren’t free until we say “No” to our handlers and take back our free will.  Then we can use the power of truth and unconditional love to dissolve the illusion that has imprisoned us.  We can start allowing our own True Self to write the script for our life.  The protagonist of “God’s Slave” was not killed; he was free.

How Roles Can Screw Us Up, and How to Escape Them

Think Different

By Cathy Eck

 

Roles 101

I really enjoyed my ex-husband’s father.  When everyone went off to church on Saturday night or Sunday morning, we would turn off the television, drink an icy cold Iron City, and laugh at our stupid stories.  He was alive, smart, and so much fun.  He was healthy and vibrant.  But the minute the door opened and the family returned, he was an actor who had been signaled to get his ass on stage.  He became a sick, old man who never amounted to anything.  His shoulders dropped.  His back hurt.  His smile turned into a frown, and he would quickly turn on the television.  He had a long-standing role in that family; there was nothing I could do to stop him from playing it or to convince my husband that I knew a different man than he did.

After enough time, I too would fall into a similar dreadful role that I couldn’t escape.  But I was like Andy in “The Shawshank Redemption.”  I was willing to chip away a little each day until I found my way back to freedom.  I learned about roles, and how deadly they can be, from observing my husband’s family.  I’d guess that the leading cause of death is giving up because you can’t escape an unwanted role.

We might have a good white-sheep role like the cute one, funny one, or smart one.  Or we could be a black sheep role like the sick one, negative one, or loser.  Roles are constructed with labels; once people associate us with a particular label, they’re often very slow to let that label go.  They don’t notice when we change; and we often feel like we’re stuck in Shawshank prison with little hope for parole.

 

Projection

Here’s where things get dicey.  People assign roles when they project the unwanted half of their beliefs out through their physical eyes (the bad side of the bottom of the triangle).  We can’t see them do this so we get tricked.  In the illusion, people (in masculine roles) see their own reflection without knowing it.  The masculine projects; the feminine reflects.

They call you the perky one because that’s how they see you, not how you really are.  Suddenly, you’re more perky in their presence; you might like that they bring out that quality in you.  But if they call you lazy or rude because you don’t talk around them (since they bore the living shit out of you),  you’ll find yourself unable to be perky even if you normally are.  Even worse, with a “bad” label, they’ll try to fix you, cementing the label more deeply.

In my experience, the best escape route is to let go from the feminine role until we get into the masculine role.  What we do next is critical.  Most screw up right here.  Once in the masculine role, we must let go of anything we see outside of us that generates emotion until the whole world appears free.  We can’t get free while holding people hostage in roles with our beliefs.

Getting rid of the need for approval is key to getting free of labels.  We must stop measuring our success based upon what others think of us and start measuring our success by the purity of our OWN mind.   Likewise, we stop measuring other people by what they say or do and start measuring them by the quality of their thinking.

For example, we say that people who inspire and motivate others are good people.  But why are they inspiring and motivating?  They see an uninspired and unmotivated world.  They’re fixing their own projection.  When we move into the masculine role, we see our beliefs about others, people, animals, plants, and the world.   It is our job to let go of what we see until we see free choice, true versus false, and a divine sort of justice.  Most people fix their projections and call it a career.

 

No Roles

The mental perspective is the cure for everything wrong in the world.  From a physically-oriented perspective, medical doctors are helpful; mentally oriented, they’re cursing patients with labels called diagnoses. They focus on sickness, not health.  In a physical orientation, veterans are heroes; mentally oriented, they’re blindly obedient killers.  Physically oriented, caretakers are servants to the needy; mentally oriented, they’re enablers or prison guards.  If we cling to a physically-oriented role, we can’t get free.  It’s impossible!

If you feel like you don’t fit into the world, you probably are more comfortable with the mental perspective.  You might feel judgment from others because people with physically oriented perspectives fit in; they think they’re good and right.  They have a free pass to be completely irresponsible with their mind.  You may have tried to avoid the physically-oriented world, but that isn’t necessary.  I assure you that the illusion won’t affect you once you let go of your beliefs and let your free mind lead your physical body and experience.

Roles disappear once we adopt the mental perspective.  Those who were perceived as good become false; and those who were labeled bad or wrong are revealed to be reflections of false good roles.  It becomes clear that the normal view of life is illusory; whatever was wrong in the illusion will be false in the free world.

When this mental shift happens, shit no longer happens.  A different world is revealed; it was hidden below our beliefs all along.  Roles, authority, and the illusion lose their false power.  We have nothing to fear anymore.  It was all just the boogie man under the bed; he wasn’t real.  The illusion takes over our imagination so we lose our creativity; when we let go of the illusion, our creativity returns.

Fortunately, we don’t have to wait for others to live from this perspective.  It’s there when we let go of our OWN physically-oriented perspective.  It’s there when we live entirely from the mental, True Self, perspective — the world of mental cause producing physical effect.

Labels: The Seeming True Self Destroyer (Part II)

Pride humility judgment tolerance

By Cathy Eck

 

Victimhood and Victories

Labels create invisible prisons.  Sometimes the cell walls are imposed by others (discussed in Part I).  But often, people hold on to labels even though they’re destroying or imprisoning themselves.

Individuals and cultures hold on to victories and victimhood affecting their perspectives.  We’re all victims of the illusion — perpetrators and victims are just roles relabeled victor upon winning and victim upon losing.  Both hold on to their labels; therefore, history repeats itself.  Battles on all levels are simply the meeting of opposing beliefs.  The one who is least emotional will win.  The True Self can’t lose because at that state of mind, we have no beliefs or emotions.

The victorious hold on to their superior label because they perceive it gives them power.  Too often, the perks of victimhood are just too delicious.  The victim often becomes the perpetrator when they won’t let go because they perpetually punish the victor in their mind.

 

Heroism

True heroism is beyond labels.  Fighting a war or doing what most believe impossible is heroism in the illusion.  In truth, letting go takes far more courage and compassion, but you’ll never be labeled a hero for letting go.  A hero requires an enemy.  There are no enemies outside the illusion.  Batman isn’t needed without the Joker.

The illusion rewards and disempowers us at the same time.  We applaud someone who says: “I’m a recovering drug addict.”  At the same time, they’re told they’ll fight that battle for life.  Habits exist because the cause persists.  We didn’t create the cause; we simply believed the illusion just like everyone else.

Positive labels, like hero or survivor, feel good until we realize that good labels are false and have no lasting power to protect us.  Positive emotions keep us trapped just like those we label negative.  We love rags-to-riches and hero stories.  But to maintain the hero label, we must keep the poverty or opposition in our mind as a potential. One day the opponent or problem we thought we defeated could gain enough strength to return.  Letting go provides the safety that we think we can only get from heroism and winning.

 

Pride

Pride creates seductive labels that are often hard to let go.  A good example is the American bumper stickers that say, “My kid’s an honor student.”  Parents love them; most kids hate them.  Next grading period the kid doesn’t make honor roll.  Now they have to look at that fucking bumper sticker everyday and remember how they were special because of something they did, not who they are.

Titles are another form of label.  Doctor, General, Queen, or Pope are professions, but people use the titles to define superiority and inferiority based on knowledge, position, or pedigree.  The titles don’t belong outside the office.  We aren’t our jobs.

One who fears pride tends to avoid saying anything good about themselves.  They develop false humility that keeps them artificially small.  There’s nothing wrong with saying, “I got the Nobel Peace Prize.”  Everyone will be happy for us unless they have jealousy issues.  But if years later, we introduce ourself by saying, “I’m John, Nobel prize winner,” at a cocktail party where it’s out of context, then pride has come to stay.  Pride causes us to hold on to labels instead of letting them go and discovering who we really are.  When we make our career, college, team, nationality, or children’s accomplishments matter more than who we are, we’re screwed.

 

Judgments

Judgments are permanent labels.  Judging another creates false superiority by placing us in the masculine role.  But superiority is illusory.  The judge is just as locked in the illusion as the person they’re judging.  The pair now have an unhealthy false-self connection.  Judges are certain they’re right; some hold the other on the hook forever.  They choose false-self rightness over being their True Self.  The True Self views opposition as false and powerless.  There’s no need to punish or forgive; letting go is all that’s necessary.

It’s never too late to let go of judgment.  People have freed me of judgments without saying a word.  I could feel it.  When we hold another on the hook, we hold ourselves on the hook.  When another won’t free us, we feel that they’re in our mind or body.  The emotions feel endless.

Those emotions will leave if we recognize the judgement against us was false.  But we won’t do that if we fear the judge might be right.  We might need the judge.  Or we maybe we think our emotional connection with the judge is love.

Someone who constantly labels us with, “You are…” doesn’t love us.  Judging isn’t love.  We’re simply a good projection screen for them so they don’t have to own, fix, or suffer the consequences of their beliefs.  We’re an enabler if we allow them to continue to project on us.

When we let go of our feminine role in their life, we see that.  This took me so long to learn this lesson.  If the judge wants the truth, they’ll hear us.  If not, we’ll join the ecstatically joyous divorcees’ community.  We’ll realize we’d rather be happy and homeless than spend another day working for an authoritarian ass.  We’ll leave our religion for a breath of fresh air.  When we escape our handlers, we catch a whiff of the heaven on earth that the handler promised but never delivered.

“The false masculine role always tells us that we’re doing to them what they’re actually doing to us.”  Most people are on the receiving end of that giant illusory error because they’re stuck in false feminine roles.  The false masculine role has become far too proficient at the projection of labels.  Don’t wait for them to change.  Step out of the role as their mirror by letting go.  When there’s no one left to project on, the game will end.

 

 

 

Labels: The Seeming True Self Destroyer (Part I)

Ambigram NO Labels NO Lies

By Cathy Eck

 

NO LABELS, NO LIES

If you’ve been reading this blog, you know that beliefs are disruptive lies that come disguised as the truth.  That’s why we accept them into our mind without discriminating.  We give others our beliefs with the intention of controlling or helping them because we can’t see beyond the belief to recognize that it’s false.  Labels are simply a collection of beliefs that we either hate or love.  Like beliefs, we often accept them without discrimination.

To escape the illusion, we must have precision in our words.  That precision supports us in seeing the difference between something illusory and something true.  The triangle process is a good way to develop word precision.  It helps us get real and identify what’s truly happening when words are exchanged.

The meaning of words is often reversed or confused in the illusion.  Beliefs are treated as if they’re true.  The false God is treated as the Creator; occult is confused with initiation.  Goodness, in the illusion, becomes obedience to authority.  Winning morphs into success when another loses.  The illusion is all about level confusion.

Labels beg for word precision.  If you don’t have word precision, you confuse and harm others.  We do to others what was done to us until we recognize that what was done to us was false.  People in the illusion label people for eternity.  They say, “You’re incurable.”  You’re a victim of wackadoodle disease.”  “You’re an idiot.”  “You’re ugly.”  “You’re fat.”  “You’re a Smith and will always be a Smith.”  “You’re an Asian, gay, or Hispanic.”  The one label that would not harm us, we rarely use, “You’re a human being.”

Labels also go the other direction, which is just as bad and more seductive.  “You’re a genius.”  “You’re beautiful.”  “You’re the Dali Lama.”  “You’re a saint.” or “You’re an old soul.”

Then there are the labels that we give ourselves.  After I sold my technology business, I decided I wanted to go naked — not without clothes — without labels.  People would, of course, ask me what I did.  I’d say, “Nothing.”  No one could accept that.  “Are you a housewife?  A mother?  A retiree?  A homeless person?  A fucking antisocial idiot?”  They wanted me to own a label dammit.

Eventually, we figure that if we’re going to get labeled anyway, we’d better label ourself.  “I’m an artist.”  “I’m a Muslim.”  “I’m a sufferer of wackadoodle disease.”  You watch, someone labeled hypochondriac will think they have that disease!  “I’m a fighter for truth.”  “I’m an engineer.”  “I’m shy.”  The very way we speak labels by saying “I am” or “You are” gives them permanence, making change difficult or impossible.

 

Labels Can Feel Like Murder

We must choose our wording carefully when discussing labels.  When someone asks what I do?  I answer in a temporary way.  Currently I mentor people and write.  In that way, I’m not defined by my current activity.  But our friends and family are often unkind and more permanent in choosing their labels.  They say,  “You’re so…..  You’re a ……  You always …..  You never…..”  They believe that what they see in us is true; it’s not.

I learned to watch my language carefully in business.  If I defined someone by their errors, I’d destroy a very good employee.  With my children, I learned the same lesson.   I didn’t want to ruin my perfect child.  In the masculine role, I had to discriminate between true and false constantly.  It took lots of practice.  We all behave as false selves at times.  We live in a fucking false world.  That’s reality.  But that isn’t who we are.

I learned that the truth looked like this, “You’re acting irresponsible today.”  The person was acting in a false way.  If it was my projection, the situation went away.  I avoided breaking my precious mirror.  If they were asking for help without knowing it, I offered help.  Often people do shitty things to us or behave in ridiculous ways because they’re asking for help without knowing it.  Letting go and then speaking in this way healed 80% of the situations.  The others were not correctable by me because they showed me something that they were reflecting for someone else in their life.  They wanted me to fix their handler; and I couldn’t do that.  But I could help them let go from the feminine role.

But one caution, this isn’t about saying the prettier words.  It’s about knowing the person isn’t inherently what they’re doing in this moment.

 

You Are vs. You Are Acting

You are acting… is a statement that opens the door to discover causal beliefs.  We can’t fix or find the cause of a problem if we think the problem is true — truth is immortal.  We don’t make friends or love someone by labeling them in a permanent way with “You are…”  We put them up against a wall when we do that.  No one can fix or change the truth.  We must admit something is false to let it go.  That is the secret of letting go.  Knowing that the words we thought or heard weren’t true.

If a doctor says, “You’re incurable,” find a new doctor.  If a teacher labels you ADD, get a new teacher.  If your preacher projects his sin on you, for God’s sake run like hell and find your True Self.  Sadly, people marinate in the soupy projection  of false masculine roles until they believe that the stone cast upon them was deserved.  It changes them forever and locks them into the illusion without an exit.  The only way to escape the label is to realize that it’s false.   We were just not acting like ourselves.  Or the person who said it was seeing their own reflection.

Once we realize that we’re just an actor, we can release the role we’ve played.  We can return to our own life path and find the happy ending to OUR own story.  We don’t have to live with our labels anymore.

Eliminating Roles — A Shortcut to Freedom

Masks we wear

By Cathy Eck

 

We’re All Actors

One of my greatest ah-ha moments came while listening to an interview of Forest Whitaker after his incredible performance in the “Last King of Scotland.”   Forest played the brutal Ugandan dictator, Idi Amin; and he really owned the character.  My insight came when he said that it took him three months to shed that role and get back to being himself.

Wait a minute, three months?  It took him only three months to shed Idi Amin and get back to himself?  Idi Amin had enough baggage to keep a million people busy letting go for years.

Why do people believe that letting go takes forever?  Shit, people in the east think it takes lifetimes.  They sit in the forest or a cave for decades, and they still don’t come out themselves.  If Whitaker can let go of Idi Amin in only three months, why can’t I let my roles go in three days?  After all, I’m clearly no Idi Amin.

The answer was very clear.  Forest Whitaker knows that he isn’t Idi Amin.  You and I, however, often believe that we’re the roles we play.  We often can’t tell if a belief that we carry in mind is true or false until we let it go.

Often we don’t know that a belief lives in our unconscious until a person or event exposes it.  Most people can’t tell the difference between their pleasant mask and their True Self so they don’t let go.  But we can’t let go of our True Self — letting go never causes a problem.  Freedom requires letting go of our entire false self — to return to a blank slate so we can write and direct the life script that we desire.

 

Roles that Bind Us

We’ve all believed and accepted many roles throughout life.  Roles can be fun if they’re temporary; ask any actor.  But when a role becomes permanent, it can be hell.  Roles can define us and keep us stuck.  We live as if we have a prominently displayed sign on our chest exposing our label.  People sense that label and treat us accordingly.

In addition, we’ve been trained to believe that we can’t let go of a role that another assigned to us, especially if that person was an authority.  It feels like they need to free us.

Relationships make stepping out of roles difficult because people think we’re insane when we let go of a belief that they still believe to be true.  Their reality proves them right, and people in the illusion confuse reality with truth.  They don’t realize that we’re not excluding them; and they can still believe whatever they want about their life.  No one has the right to tell another what to believe.  But relationships often form around common beliefs.  People think that we’re letting them go when we’re just letting go of a belief.

Some people expect us to show up in our mask; and if their expectation is very strong or if we are a people pleaser, it reinforces our role.

Letting go of a physical or mental diagnosis can be nearly impossible if the people in our life believe our label and treat us as having that label.  Healing is often much easier when you simply remove yourself from those who label you.

 

Living Without Roles

Imagine if you knew you were acting?  After all, you are.  If you’re being yourself, you wouldn’t play a permanent role, especially one you didn’t like.  You’d play a role and drop it when you had enough.  You’d drop it easily because you’d know you weren’t the role.

Dropping roles means dropping lots of beliefs at one time.  When we accept a label or role, we accept all the beliefs that are part of that acting engagement.   A great actor will study the character and adopt his or her state of mind.  Once the state of mind is accepted, the part flows naturally.  They appear to become the character by wearing the character’s mask.  But they drop the mask when it isn’t useful any longer.  If we’re resisting dropping our mask, it’s wise to see if it has a payoff.  If we let go of the payoff, the mask should come off more easily.

When we drop any label or role, we create a massive amount of space for our True Self to fill.  Ideally, we’d just be our Self and everything would be perfect.  But our world is in transition.  If we’re uncomfortable dropping the entire role, then we can just drop some of the beliefs that make up that role.  We can show up at mom’s, play the daughter or son role she assigns while witnessing our act and maintaining our sense of Self; then we can drop the beliefs that bothered us most.  Each time we visit, we can let go of the beliefs that arise and incorporate a little more of our True Self.  We can also let go of any belief in our mind that she can’t handle the shift and then let the cards fall where they may.

I used to feel guilty dropping roles, as if they were some sort of contract that I agreed to for life.  But they aren’t contracts; we do everyone a favor when we just be ourselves (although it might take them some time to realize that).

Too many people keep playing old outdated roles because they don’t have another way to be with people they love.  They don’t want to lose the person so they accept the role and resent every minute of it.  Conscious role playing is a temporary bridge to a new way of relating.

Letting go of labels and roles is the fast track to freedom.  It takes courage to drop roles completely.  And, as you can see by the example of Forest Whitaker, it takes knowing clearly who you are not and being willing to let that character go.

Eliminating the Masculine and Feminine Roles

masculine and feminine roles

By Cathy Eck

 

Roles Aren’t True

In the last few posts, I’ve explained the masculine and feminine roles within the illusion.  Remember, roles hold the illusion together.  There’s no such thing as roles to the True Self.  Roles are real; they do exist in the illusory world.  However, they aren’t true.  This is good news; it means that we can let roles go.

The false self depends on roles; it has endless tricks to get people into roles where it can win, dominate, and be good or right.  If we aren’t aware of the purpose of roles, we fall prey to them.  We end up losing without even knowing we were competing; we submit to others who aren’t true leaders, or we look bad or wrong.

Our goal in initiation is to get back to the time before we got stuck in roles.  Of course, we received our first role the moment we were born — daughter or son.  Many people never escape that role.  They’re still submissive to their parents on the day they die.  Thus, they never live their own life.

 

Breaking Free of Roles

Recognition:  The first step is recognizing that we’re stuck in a role.

Masculine or feminine:  It’s important to determine whether we’re playing a masculine or feminine part.  Sometimes, it’s obvious.  Other times, we aren’t sure and must look for subtle clues.  Our body gives us clues through pain, disease, or symptoms.  Actions also speak louder than words.

Ghosts:  In feminine roles, we often feel oppressed.  But the oppressor or controller isn’t always who we think.  False minds don’t want us to find the real cause.  

My ex-husband believed I was controlling him, but I wasn’t.  I wasn’t willing to accept his beliefs as true, and to some false selves that can seem controlling.  But I wasn’t demanding or needy.  In fact, as I let go, he came to have so much freedom it was like he wasn’t married; but still he insisted that I was controlling him.  Eventually, I could see that it was his mother’s voice that was dominating him, not mine.  He just couldn’t see through his own veil of beliefs.

Roles are Mental:  The roles we see in the world are the effect of the roles we hold in OUR OWN mind.  If we feel controlled by someone, that’s because we still hold controlling authorities from our past in mind.  My ex-husband felt controlled by his own inner feminine (formed by his mother).  Whatever I said or did passed through that filter and tainted his hearing and vision.  He never heard me; he heard his mother’s voice replaying old tapes.

Make roles about roles, not about people who play them:  When we cast someone in a role, we’re holding them hostage.  My experience as a character in my ex-husband’s illusion created the desire to help others who feel stuck in someone else’s illusion to escape.  I never wanted another to go through that pain and confusion.

Step Back:  People playing the masculine role seldom have an incentive to let the role go.  They’re usually winning, looking good, and getting to be right.  Of course, their victories are illusory; but the world believes them.  They get approval, attention, and rewards from their roles and labels.  We can escape their illusion once we understand how to let go of beliefs.

We must realize that the roles that others play in our life exist as potentials in our mental drama.  We appear to be victims in the illusion; but we aren’t.  We’ve simply accepted beliefs that allow the roles to perpetuate.  Most of those beliefs come from religion, cultural traditions, or social conventions.  They’re beliefs that most don’t even question.

For example:  “I should listen to others.  Emotions are bad.  I should be nice to my authorities.  I can’t tell another that their belief is false.  If it happened to them, it could happen to me.  I can’t correct authority.”  In my case, the main belief that kept me stuck was a feminine role — a false perception of wife.  With each belief I let go, the false authorities in my mind lost more power until I could no longer play the false wife role.

Do the Process:  Once we find the belief, we’re only half way there.  Often people stop when they find the belief because of another belief that says, “Now that I found the cause, I’m free of the belief.”  This is common in the new age and creates projection, not release.  Denying a belief, excluding ourself, or choosing a new belief is NOT letting go.

To drop the belief, we must recognize the pain it has caused.  We must witness and release the emotion the belief generated, and we must realize the emotion is saying the belief isn’t true.  It may have been real in our past; but it wasn’t true.  The belief isn’t just false for us.  It’s false for everyone.  This is often hard to do.  If we’ve been pressed underneath an authority’s illusion for decades, we don’t feel like letting them off the hook.  But it’s worth it.

When we’ve completely eliminated a belief from our mind, we don’t experience it in the world anymore.  Now we can help others let go because we can discriminate again.

We must let go of any beliefs that say we need to believe others, especially authority.  False selves will do their very best to convince us that their beliefs are true.  The false self fears death.  Exposure is its kryptonite.  It tries hard to stay hidden beneath an acceptable mask.

Wash, Rinse, and Repeat:  If the stain doesn’t come all the way out,  keep letting go until it’s gone.  In this work, a belief is gone when you no longer see evidence of it.  It’s gone when you don’t fear it.  It’s gone when you know it’s false.  Persistence, honesty, and courage are the qualities that will take you all the way.

Help, I’m Stuck in Someone Else’s Illusion

Stuck in someone's illusion

By Cathy Eck

 

Ties that Bind

For the last two decades, I’ve been connecting the dots that link our stories, beliefs, minds, and physical experiences.  Prior to my research, I felt this link intuitively but couldn’t explain myself.  People thought I was an idiot because I wouldn’t believe their illusion was true.

I looked bad to others because I went against the grain of society.  But, I wasn’t a bad person.  I know that many readers of this blog feel the same way.  Fitting in isn’t an option; we just can’t make our minds small enough to fit into the tiny box that most people call normal life.  But often we unknowingly allow their limited perspective into our minds, and we feel like an alien that must join them or rebel.

Initiation, fortunately, isn’t about joining or rebelling.  It’s about letting go.

I’ve gotten emails from people from less civilized countries asking if I could remove a curse or get them out of someone’s mind.  It seems more obvious to those we call uncivilized that humans get stuck in the minds of others and can’t get out.  Clairvoyants describe this as cording.  They’ll say that they see an etheric cord between a person and their mother or witch doctor.

 

Roles

In other articles, I’ve discussed the masculine and the feminine roles within the illusion.  A witch doctor or a mother plays a masculine role because they have authority.  Feminine roles, like child or patient, have no authority within the illusion.  We all start out as children playing a feminine role.  If the person in the feminine role has a more expansive perspective than the person in authority (masculine role), they feel stuck in someone else’s small illusory view of the world.  Most find it easier to obey the authority than to fight them.  They accept the illusion as the truth and make the best of it.  Fortunately, not everyone is so submissive or life on this planet would be unbearable.

The world we see is a projection of our minds — our beliefs.  I know it doesn’t look that way.  But when you let go of beliefs and see the changes in your world, it becomes obvious.

If we’re submissive to another person’s authority, then we see their projection.  Powerful leaders figured this out eons ago; this is how one person can control the masses.  They get the masses to believe their beliefs.  And it seems people are willing to believe just about any ridiculous belief system.  This is especially true if the people believe the worst lie of all: that something that feels bad can be true.  If people are emotionally reversed to believe lies that clearly feel horrible, they will serve the masters for thousands of years without the authority even lifting a pinky finger.  Sound familiar?

People who belong to religions, see their religious leader’s projections.  As citizens, we see the projections of our political leaders; we even fight their wars.  If we’ve turned our mind over to educators, we see the world they teach us to see.  We also see the projections of the leader of our family, who sees their leader’s projections.  This is how we get stuck in someone else’s illusion.  It’s complex mental web of beliefs.

 

Removing the Cord

It seems impossible to escape because we didn’t create the illusion that imprisons us; it exists in the mind of our authority figures.  But I’m going to share with you the biggest secret of all.

To escape another’s illusion, you must recognize that every slave shares common beliefs with their master.  Every victim shares common beliefs with their abuser.  An authority can’t put you into their illusion without first selling you their beliefs, often with fear and force.

Since we borrowed the beliefs, we can let them go.  But we have to face the fear that caused us to accept the belief.  Once we know how to let beliefs go, our freedom is assured.  We can break open our prison door and take back all our power.

 

Two Sides of Beliefs

All beliefs are dual and have a good and evil side.  The two sides of the belief are like two sides of a coin.  You can get rid of the coin, but you can’t get rid of one side of it.  People try to be good which only makes evil stronger.  Religion lied — its totally designed to keep us stuck within the illusion by telling us to chase good.  It has no exit ramp.  Religious and spiritual people say that the more you move to the light the bigger the evil that chases you.  That’s how it looks in the illusion.  Increase good and you automatically increase your enemy in equal measure.

We’re back to our old standby, the triangle process.  To move up to the top of the triangle, we must get rid of both sides of the bottom of the triangle — not just the bad side.

So while many new agers tell you to take out your magical scissors and cut your magical cord and burn it in your magical fire, that is complete bullshit.  To fix any problem, we must find and correct the cause.  Regardless of how it looks, the cause is always in our own mind.

If we let go of the beliefs that we share with the person in authority, we slowly set ourselves free.  We can’t exist in their illusion if we don’t share their beliefs.  It just isn’t possible.

We’re often afraid to let go of our good because we fear we’ll be bad.  But the opposite of light and good is actually false.  If our goodness and light is true and real, we can’t let it go.  If our goodness and light is false, we’re better off without it.  The only way to end evil is to get rid of its twin — good.  When you get rid of the false good and the fluorescent light, you end up with the truth.  You are free.