Being Truly Good by Eliminating Good and Evil

Good vs. Good and Evil

By Cathy Eck

 

Illusion Confusion

Good and evil rests at the core of the illusion.  Often it takes on a different form, like positive and negative; but ultimately, judging another as negative means that we’re seeing negativity as evil.  Good and evil was the way humans gave God an opponent to battle.  God originally represented our perfect True Self; therefore, the opponent of God is our OWN false self projected out into the world.  The final battle isn’t in the outer world.  It’s in our mind.  It’s initiation.

The confusion around good and evil causes so many problems.  People genuinely want to be good.  They really do.  There’s a reason for that; they were born good, and some part of their mind remembers their True Self.  We arrive with no opponent.  Good’s opposite arises when we accept another person’s notion of good — their rules or morals.  Rules tell us how to be good according to an outer system.  Rules deny the innate goodness of people.  That’s why most of my readers hate them.  Once we accept that being good is following outer rules even if they sound like the truth, we also now hold within the possibility of evil or badness if we disobey those outer rules.

We also have experts giving us rules for how to be healthy, how to be spiritual, how to be social, and how to be successful.  The result is that health, spirituality, social acceptance, and success have gotten harder — not easier.  We live in a bubble of experts determined to keep our natural wisdom and truth under wraps.  And often our truth is screaming in our mind, but we feel paralyzed if we try to speak it.  We’re so well trained to look outside for answers.

 

Fear of Judgment

When I first saw the illusion within myself, I felt like a backed-up sewage system.  I was no longer passing on my beliefs to others because I knew they were false.  But others didn’t stop demanding my obedience to their beliefs and rules.  This created a long and grueling awkward phase.  I couldn’t figure out how to escape this prison.

I could no longer obey their rules because I knew were false and limiting.  But disobedience resulted in judgment.  I hated being judged by those who still thought their rules were valid and good.  My discrimination felt worthless in a world where no one else was discriminating.  In fact, it seemed that my discrimination just got me into trouble with nearly everyone.

As we move toward freedom, we meet the same or similar experiences and feel the same emotions we felt and did not let go earlier in life.  We are slowly releasing beliefs.  The illusion shrinks each time we succeed in letting go until nothing is left.

Our fear of judgment probably came from the ancient act of cursing.  In earlier times, people believed that another person’s words or evil eye could take them down.  We all have a deep fear of other humans within us, especially if they are envious or angry.  The winners of the illusion play on this.  When we’re afraid, we’re easily controlled.

Many people adopt another belief like, “I don’t care what they think of me.”  Some work on their reputation and create a great looking mask.  Signs and symbols came out of the fear of expression, not truth.  We all have fear of beliefs and believers, which ultimately results from the foundation belief that the truth is less powerful than a belief system.  We think our love and truth is not enough in this world to keep us safe.  But if you let go enough, you’ll see that’s not true.

This all got worse with the positive thinking movement.  People said that words had power; and that’s true.  But most people’s words are not empowering; this only resurrected our fear of people, especially believers.

 

Psychological Reversal Again

The issue always comes back to the basic psychological reversal around emotions.  When people are sucked into the illusion, they think that something that feels bad IS true.  In the illusion, war, disease, poverty, and evil are all considered true and unavoidable — yet they all feel horrible.

When a resident of the illusion judges us, and it does feel bad to them, they don’t reject the thought; they act on it.  They want us to change, and often we do.  If we can’t beat them, we’ll join them.

I first came to understand this with my own children.  I’d notice something in them that I didn’t like — it looked very real AND I felt emotion.  If I mentioned it to them, they had no clue what I was talking about.  So I’d take responsibility and just let it go.  After awhile, I realized that I was seeing my own fears projected on them.  I let go from the masculine role until the problem I saw disappeared — it always did.  I did not make them responsible for my emotions.  Then I could see their perfection.

This is the sticking point of the illusion that traps us all.  Others think we’re causing their emotions with our disobedience.  They try to get their emotions to stop by changing their projection.  It doesn’t work EVER!  The projection isn’t the cause.

Now I understand what people were doing to me.  Being our True Self forces other people’s beliefs to surface; when this happens the false self goes into blame mode.  I used the feminine method of letting go in myself until I realized that they’re false thinking has no power to harm me.  If I stay in truth, and don’t judge them back, they back off.  In truth, beliefs only affect believers.  But rebelling against believers gets us stuck in their illusion.

Eventually, the concept of good and evil dies a natural death.  There’s no apocalypse, no buildings collapse — nothing physical needs to change.  The illusion was just a perspective.  Good and evil disappear; only true good remains as it was in the beginning.

 

 

 

Turning False Good into True Good

True good versus false good

By Cathy Eck

 

False Good or True Good

False goodness is a big trap on the road to freedom.   What people consider good according to social standards isn’t real goodness because it has an opposite.  It’s based on blindly following social rules.  Consequently, many people look good when they aren’t good; often those that look bad are much closer to their True Self.   We see and hear what’s on the surface; we feel what’s hidden underneath.  False goodness should always produce emotions.  It’s our signal that what we’re hearing or seeing is false.

Many leaders, marketers, preachers, gurus, teachers, and inspirational speakers know the power of the false good mask.  You might even have friends or family who have a good mask.  You actually do them and yourself a favor when you stop falling for their act.  But often we fear what lies below the mask, so we refrain from exposing their shadow.  In my experience, people usually treat false good people much better than they treat those who are truly good because they’re afraid of the masters of the false good mask.  Most people have a deep fear of good people that they ignore because it makes no sense.

If we’re truly observant, we’ll see that what society labels good is the removal or fixing of emotions, which we think happens by fixing the problems (effects).  Mom feels lonely, so we go visit her.  Our boss is worried about our low numbers, so we work harder.  We’re taught that emotions are bad.  If we eliminate another’s emotions, we’re good.

But that’s the giant error of the illusion.  Emotions are the messenger that points to wrong thinking (beliefs).  We’re trained to shoot the messenger and ignore the causal beliefs.  Fixing mom’s loneliness or our boss’s worries isn’t our problem.  We aren’t the cause of their emotions; their beliefs are.

 

An Example

Our friend, Jane, feels ugly.  She’s put on twenty pounds since her divorce.  Stress lines cause her to look older.  She believes no one will love her again.

Sally is her friend.  Sally listens to Jane and sympathizes with her.   Jane likes the attention of Sally’s sympathy.  So they bond over Jane’s problem.  Sally has been trained to be nice so she says, “Jane, you don’t look bad.  What’s not to love about you? You’ll find love again.”  She tells Jane what Jane wants to hear.  She might also give Jane some beauty tips.  Or perhaps she offers to do a makeover for her.  Sally appears good because she temporarily removed Jane’s emotions.

Sally’s behavior is socially correct.  But she doesn’t help Jane one bit.  In order for Sally to inspire or fix Jane’s emotions, Sally has to hold Jane’s problems and beliefs in her mind as true.  She’s actually feeding Jane’s false self while appearing to be good, nice, and supportive.   If she gives Jane advice, she’s feeding Jane more beliefs.  Likewise, giving Jane a makeover will cause Jane to feel good for a day or two, but it won’t cure Jane’s false belief that she’s ugly.  Only letting go of the false causal belief will cure Jane.  Then she won’t need Sally to inspire her or help her feel good.  And therein lies the problem.  When we fix the causal belief, we don’t need others.  Codependence disappears.  We’ve got no one to serve.

Sally has been trained that to be kind and to serve is good and righteous.  She feels good when she fixes Jane’s problem or offers advice because she tells herself that she made Jane happy.  She didn’t make Jane happy.  In truth, Sally covered up Jane’s emotional indicator.  She helped her to look away from the cause so now it’s unlikely that the problem will ever go away.

Of course, Sally does wish Jane well.  She did what she was trained to do; she was taught that good people inspire and serve others.  Real service and true good eventually puts the server out of a job.

When we open our eyes, we realize that what society labels good is actually harmful.

This understanding cures us of self-help gurus and expensive experts.  It isn’t anyone’s job to inspire or fix even one other.  But we can all help others to find their own inspiration and wisdom by pushing them to let go of their causal beliefs and by letting go of the beliefs we hold in our mind about them.

 

The Escape

More people are trapped by good than bad.   If we’ve gotten stuck in someone’s heroic mission, bought into their get-rich-quick scheme, or play the black sheep in our family, we have to find the beliefs in us that keep us stuck in their illusion.  We probably won’t convince the person with the good mask to free us.  Ask yourself: “What you think you need or want?  What are you hoping to fix?  What emotions are you trying to get rid of?  What do you think they can do that you can’t?”

If we fall for get-rich-quick schemes, we have a belief in lack.  If we’re desperate for a teacher or healer, spent lots of money on the psychic hotline, or have an addiction to self-help books, we believe that we don’t know the answer or can’t heal ourselves.  If we hold on to family or friends that mistreat us, we fear being alone.  Hidden beliefs are wrapped in emotions so it’s never comfortable to dive into them.  But when we see the beliefs and let them go, we’ve eliminated the cause.  We no longer need the product or service.  The solution will actually look worthless because it is.

We’re often labeled rude or uncaring when we stop blindly obeying the socially-defined good rules.  Those who win with the social system, have to make us wrong to keep themselves right.  But when we heal this confusion within ourselves, we become truly good and authentic — our own false good mask disappears.  Then we never fall for the illusion’s goodness trick again.

Blinded by Our Culture

Cuenca on a dark rainy night

By Cathy Eck

 

Exposing Beliefs

Once we embark on the journey of initiation, our True Self exposes our beliefs.  If we follow our inspiration and commit to let go (not learn or escape), we’ll reach the destination.  Until we let go, however, places and situations can feel like impossible tests.  Ecuador continues to deliver exactly what I need.

I stay in a small B&B.  Since I’ve arrived, the hostess has been pleasant; but she constantly leaves out important details.  For example, a couple of weeks ago, she took me and two other guests to the mall, which is far from our home.  When we arrived, I asked her where and when we should meet her for the drive back.  She said, “Oh I can’t take you home.”  Fortunately, one member of our group knew the bus back to town.

When she picked me up at the airport, she was late.  This was disturbing because I no longer had phone service.  Then we went to get in her car — I thought.  Instead we got in a cab.  We stayed at a hotel, took a few more cabs, had a meal, and then took a transportation service that was right next to the airport.  I felt like my wallet was being raped.  What could have been a fourteen dollar ride to her house cost me about $80 in cabs, food, transport services, and hotel rooms.

Everyone in the house has had the same experience.  It would be easy to believe that we’re all just victims of her chaotic world.  As guests, we’re playing a feminine role in HER home.  This triggers our feelings of powerlessness.  It nearly always feels impossible to let go when we’re in a feminine role, but it isn’t.

 

No Victims

I’m never one to accept victimhood so I first let go of memories of lying by omission.  I’d often felt confused when people didn’t tell me the whole story, and I could only resolve my confusion when they finally told the truth.  That wasn’t good enough anymore.  I wanted letting go to take me to the place where people would always tell me everything I needed to know.

In every case, they didn’t think lying by omission was wrong.  In fact, they often felt they were sparing me pain.  There’s no “Thou shalt not lie or omit details,” in the Ten Commandments.

My mind kept telling me that I was stuck.  Lying or omission is a way to claim the false masculine role; the person lied too can’t get the upper hand because they’re fighting a ghost.

One morning, when my hostess once again forgot to mention a very important detail, I decided to speak with her.  Perhaps I could learn to understand her.  There was so much pain in the conversation that I had tears running down my eyes the whole time.

She was certain that she’d done nothing wrong.  “You chose to live in a typical Ecuadorian household; now you want to change me.”  I assured her that I didn’t.  “I’m a Christian woman; I don’t hurt people.”  I assured her that I understood her religion and realized she had good intentions.  This went on and on….

 

Culture

For some reason, my old business mind kicked in to save me.  “Let’s pull up your ad on the internet.  Let’s rewrite your ad as your guests see it.  This isn’t about your intention, your culture, or you; it’s about truthful marketing,” I said.  I spontaneously rewrote her ad giving her our painfully honest view of reality in her home.  Then, I said to her, “Is that ad really the ad of a Christian, typical Ecuadorian woman?”  I’d removed her mind from her cultural and religious beliefs; now she could see.

Her omission was the effect, not the cause.  She was constantly living from beliefs that she considered to be normal, cultural, or religious.  It is the old, “If everyone does it, it must be okay.”  Pride in her culture and religion kept her destructive beliefs in tact and even labeled her good for holding on to them.  Pride is one of the deadliest of tricks to keep us trapped in the illusion.

I reflected back to an earlier time when I confronted another person who lied by omission.  I also asked him why?  He said, “Everyone lies.  If you don’t, you won’t get what you want.”  Lying wasn’t bad to him either; it was necessary.  What he didn’t realize was that he was the only person I’d ever lied to.  I couldn’t help myself around him, but I hated myself for doing it.

My hostess saw herself as handling normal problems and circumstances that were typical for her religion and culture.  She knew nothing else.  For thousands of years, these traditions haven’t worked — they’ve only managed to veil our True Self.  The deeper the religion and culture in a family, organization, or country, the greater the chaos.  There are simply more beliefs to work around — think Middle East.

People will either live in apathy regarding their prison cell or decorate it and call it home.  It’s a rare one that escapes.

 

The Gift

Suddenly, I realized the gift of this experience.  My Spanish is poor.  When I talk to her, I’m thinking and listening very hard.  I’m focused on her words so I’m not feeling.  Being in a country where you can’t understand the language is a lot like being a child.  It takes us back to those moments when we didn’t know what people were saying or the rules of the world; but we did want the approval and love or our parents or other authorities.

So we innocently listened, trusted, and obeyed.  Sadly, some of those we trusted didn’t tell us the whole truth about life.  We fell into their world.  We accepted their beliefs as true, and we felt that we could not change their mind.  We believed that their religion or culture was true because we didn’t realize that they were blinded by it.