We Are the Body — Western Meditation

God in the stars

By Cathy Eck

 

Nobody or Body?

A popular saying among spiritual teachers is “You’re Not the Body.”  Since authoritative gurus/teachers say those words, people believe them.  If we aren’t our body, then we’re “nobody.”  Why do we even have a body?  Same thing goes for our senses.  The body and senses are the effect of our mind.  A True Self in a body with sharp, clear senses is as good as it gets.

Many people send their True Selves floating high above their body trying to get to the God in the sky.    Others long for the OBE (out-of-body experience).  People desire relief from the heaviness of the emotions they feel in their body.  When they exit their body, they no longer notice their emotions.  So they feel lighter.  Often they encounter the thought forms that constructed the illusion or words of truth that have been spoken within the context of the illusion.  They bring these beliefs back with them and create the next expensive workshop to success or enlightenment.  They think they’ve found the exit to truth, but they’ve been fooled.

Our truth is resting quietly below the illusion; the illusion is a construct made by human minds that veils our True Self.  We find our True Self by letting go of our false mind.  We find it in our mind — not out there somewhere.  But we have to know what is true and what is false — discrimination is key.

Floaters, as I like to call them, are highly suggestible.  As a former hypnotherapist, they make great hypnotic subjects.  When we’re hypnotized, we’ll accept anything authorities tell us.

Can you see the trick?  Magicians in powerful masculine roles of Lords and Priests have used hypnosis for thousands of years.  They got people to chase the light to a God in the sky, ignoring the True Self (discrimination system) within the body, so people didn’t notice they were being lied to.  It’s so amazingly clever that I almost have to admire them.

 

Who’s Speaking in my Mind?

Gurus keep disciples in a hypnotic state.  The disciple hears the guru’s beliefs as if they’re true.  Soon the disciples start thinking exactly like the guru.  

When my son was six, he took a martial arts class in something called Hwar Do.  The Korean teacher had an athletic, young AMERICAN woman for an assistant; she spoke with exactly the same Korean accent as her teacher.  It was like he was her mind.  It was creepy.

In my business life, I took the popular Landmark Education/EST training.  The seminar leaders spoke just like Werner Erhard.  Again, it was creepy.  They allowed their teacher to possess their mind.

Partners, lovers, and parents can also take over our mind.  Some wedding vows say “One mind, one heart.”  “Holy Marital Crap, Batman,” said Robin.

Lately, I’ve seen creepy kids on TV that speak or perform like little adults.  That’s not genius; it’s mind control.  They’re Mini-Me’s of their parents.  I love the ones that talk politics, like they were born knowing the American political system.

Religion produces the same result.  The preacher, wearing a costume that shouts authority, bores the living shit out of the congregation in a big room (that echoes) using routine, rituals, and repetition.  We stop discriminating, and our unmanned body absorbs their every word like a giant sponge.  Later when their words arise in our conscious mind, it’s our chance to let them go; but most people think the words are true and believe them again.  They hold on to those words.

Native practices use movement, chanting, or ceremony.  Vision quests and traditional meditation get us to float above our body.  Drugs do the same thing.  Letting go happens when we are in our body — feeling our emotions.

The false mind’s job is to remember.  It remembers anything until we tell it not to.  Words like, “That’s false.”  Or, “Wow, I don’t need to remember that anymore,” or my personal fav, “What the fuck was I thinking?” help us let go.  We’ve all had the experience of studying for a test and forgetting everything by the next day.  Our mind holds on to information that we need or that we consider true, but only as long as we think we need it.  Letting go is a declaration of falseness.

 

Western Meditation

One antidote for floating is what I call western meditation.  You can find the western meditation process link here.  There’s a PDF below.

In western meditation, you aren’t trying to relax or get specific results.  You’re doing what the Greeks called “Knowing Yourself” — knowing your mind.  You’re simply asking your mind to give you all its got right now.

When you tell your mind that your thoughts are false, you’ve given it permission to drop the answers to yesterday’s exam.  If emotion does arise as you do this, witness the emotion until it goes.  Beliefs and emotion go together.  If you’ve had a belief for a long time, there’s often lots of emotion attached.  Emotions always means the belief is false.

Initiation is about turning our body into a Temple for the Living God, a home for your own True Self — not a church.  When beliefs float us above our body or hypnotize us, no one is home.  We might get ideas, but we often can’t manifest those ideas in the world without lots of willpower.  Like a filmmaker, we want to bring our story to life.  If we can’t live our story, then “We don’t get no satisfaction,” (says Mick).

For most of the world, it takes too much willpower to create — people become apathetic.  They have too many beliefs to leap over.  They don’t even have the willpower to use their willpower.  In truth, the purpose of willpower is to will our mind to discriminate and let go.  Eventually, we won’t need willpower anymore.  Then our dreams are no longer in the clouds; they’re our normal reality.  We’re creators again.

Meditation for the Western Mind pdf

Repetition: The False Self’s Drug of Choice

Fractal collage of nature

By Cathy Eck

 

The Drug of Repetition

The drug of repetition is painfully obvious during the holiday season.  The television stations play the same programs.  The radios play the same songs.  People pull out the same decorations that they carefully stored away last year.  They attend the same events and services with the same family members.  They tell the same lies to their children.  We call this tradition; but it is really fast food for the false self.

The false self loves routine and repetition — it resists change.  Our false mind works exactly like a computer, operating from memorized commands.  Unless you delete the programs, you get the same output.

Now don’t get me wrong.  Repetition isn’t necessarily bad or evil; it can be useful.  I’m glad that buses follow a repetitive pattern; it makes them easier to find.  But buses weren’t born to create.  Humans were!

 

The Neighborhood of Make Believe

As children, we’re all loaded on the trolley to Mr. Roger’s Neighborhood of Make Believe.  Mr. Rogers taught us that people are predictable machines.  He changed his shoes and hung up his sweater in the same way everyday.  He repeated the same horrible songs.  He talked in a monotone, and never displayed emotion.

The Neighborhood of Make Believe was his projected world.  True Selves create; false selves imagine and project.  His world was presented as creative because things happen in make-believe that don’t happen in the real world, like talking animals and trolleys.  Yipee!

Mr. Rogers was simply projecting his own personality and issues on to outer characters so that he could stay calm and collected on the surface.  He could be good because the bad was out there, in make-believe.  Watching him, we were programmed to accept this sort of mind game as normal.

Mr. Roger’s characters don’t get along; and the king can be a royal asshole.  But Mr. Rogers is perfect, like God.  In Make Believe, we see the shadow of Mr. Roger’s mind; and like all good men, after Make Believe time, he gives us a moral lesson based on the bad behaviors of his characters.  It is the bullshit that is as old as the sands of time.

 

I Want My Fucking Dream Back

In the newly civilized world, the Lord’s (or King’s) dream became everyone’s dream.  The leaders wrote the myths, they turned off the people’s desires with beliefs, and they created reasons for the humans to serve them.

Much like today, these false leaders were the least creative men alive.  Their True Selves had big dreams, and their false selves had big limitations.  But they had strong wills and dangerously wicked power of influence.  Today these types of men run our countries, religions, businesses, and households.  We’re trained to believe they’re good; we don’t see that they are actually machines that look good and feel bad, creating confusion for those who still have feelings and emotions.

My husband was in the military for the first couple of years we were married.  For two years, I lived among the lowest forms of life I could imagine.  The soldiers all lacked spirit; they were programmed killing machines.  It showed me what people look like when no True Self remains exposed.  Military people aren’t heroes; they’re brainwashed actors playing roles in their leader’s drama.  War happens when people make beliefs more important than the truth (when they create Neighborhoods of Make Believe).  People who fight in them are the overrated products of false society who will kill their own brothers on command.  They need rehab, not medals of honor.  We don’t see this because we’re programmed too to support the troops.

 

Children and Repetition

Children appear to seek repetition.  But, children mirror their parent’s repetitive beliefs without effort because they’re marinating in the same sauce.  We learn in monkey see, monkey do fashion — memorize and repeat.  Children insert their authority figures’ rule books into their minds and follow them to the letter to avoid punishment.  When someone refuses to do this, they’re labeled bad or crazy.

OCD is the extreme of left-brain repetition.  The victim’s mind repeats the same meaningless instruction over and over.  OCD isn’t a disease; it’s a mind that won’t let go.  Leaders don’t tell us that we can let go because we wouldn’t be obedient slaves.  We’d invent our own fantasies and live our own dreams.  We’d write and direct our own stories instead of being walk-on characters in their drama.

 

Repetition Hits the Wall

Often we reach a point in our life where nothing external makes us happy anymore.  We’re sick of the status quo; tradition makes us vomit, and we find superficial conversations and social protocols intolerable.  Our True Self is screaming to do a U-turn and go back toward freedom.  If we don’t listen to this call, we get sick or die.  Death happens when the false self has snuffed out the last ray of hope for our dreams.  The True Self has no fear, so it simply prefers to start over.  But, it’s never too late.

The rules for moving toward the True Self are 180 degrees from the rules that we consider normal.  But we must watch for traps.  The new age was a big trap.  It  recycled old traditions, practices, and rituals.  Much like that 50’s skirt that looks cool after half a century, the old traditions seemed like radical change.  However, they were updated versions of the same old program, viruses included.

So if traditions and repetition got us into the illusory world, the way out is to break tradition and to shake things up.  We must challenge our thinking and let go of beliefs and limitations.  The outer changes along with the inner.  Simply changing the outer is no change at all; it is another form of deception.  Eventually, our True Self takes back the command; and we see it was all just a Neighborhood of Make Believe.

 

Caught in the trap of friends and family, read crabs in a pot article.