Letting Go Leads to “I Never F**king Believed You Anyway!”

Hating from the Illusory Egg

By Cathy Eck

 

Am I Letting Go?

People often say to me, “I don’t know if I’m letting go or not.” That’s because letting go feels odd.  Holding on feels normal. Often knowing that we did let go is more about realizing that we didn’t hold on. It’s really that simple at times.

There are also occasions when someone cuts through a huge mental program. They feel unlimited for a little while, and now they want to hold on to that clarity and unconditional love.  We’re so trained to hold on.  But the truth is that we can’t let go of our True Self; and we cause problems by holding on to the false self.  Holding on never makes sense.

Sadly, the illusion has caused people to believe that if they let go, the Mormon Tabernacle Choir will play; and Jesus will walk through their wall and kiss their feet.  That won’t happen; the false self never validates the True Self.

 

Quiet Art 

I want to share a great example of the calm, quiet art of letting go. This moment was particularly sweet; it demonstrates how our mind changes once we begin to break our false self away from our True Self.  These two mind components are meant to be separate. Western religious teachings about the soul combined these two mind aspects.  The eastern concept that everything is illusion discourages discrimination. Once our two minds start to separate, we get to a place that I call, “I never fucking believed you anyway.”

I was mentoring Jane (not her real name) on the subject of her sick cat.  She was in a damned if I do and damned if I don’t mindset. After letting go for a few minutes, she felt that she knew what to do.  She felt clear for a brief moment; then she said, “I feel guilty.”

To understand the next part of the interaction, you must understand how I mentor. Stupid as this might sound to those of you who are desperately trying to escape the feminine role, I purposely place myself in the feminine. I allow myself to feel as they speak. You see, being feminine isn’t bad when we can discriminate.  If they trick me, and occasionally they do, I’ve discovered yet another trick of the false masculine self that I must let go.

When someone is psychologically reversed, they speak words that are completely false; but they have no corresponding emotional reaction.  When that happens, I’ll feel the emotion they should feel. Their emotion is projected out.  I can then push them to revisit their statement. Oddly, Jane wasn’t psychologically reversed on this issue. Neither she or I felt emotion when she said, “I feel guilty.”  I said, “I don’t believe you. I don’t think you feel guilty at all.”

Jane has a great sense of humor and is super honest. She cracked up and said, “Your right. I thought I was supposed to say that.”  We both had a good laugh. You see, Jane was raised Catholic. She was taught that she should feel guilty every time she did something that her parents or religion didn’t like, which was often being her True Self.  She learned how to say the words, “I feel guilty,” and even act out the part of a guilty child. But there was a part of her, her True Self, that never believed the act.  Sadly, as time when on, she started to believe her own words; then she felt the corresponding emotions.

Jane had already let go of a lot of guilt-ridden beliefs in earlier sessions.  In this session, the belief that she should feel guilty showed up like a recording that she could play if an authority figure questioned her behavior. It had a purpose when she was younger; now it had none. It was easy for her to see that the belief was false because this time she saw it as a false-self act.

I’ve heard similar words from people who lost loved ones. They think they should display grief, but they don’t feel it. They put on an act; eventually, they come to believe their own act.  When I talk to them, I ask them if they really feel emotion; and they say no.  You see, we only feel emotion when we believe something false.  If we think only unconditionally loving thoughts for someone who leaves our life, we feel no emotion.  We might even feel blissful.  Emotion (or grief) means we’re thinking something other than unconditionally loving thoughts.  Perhaps, we’re fearing our future or feeling lonely — thoughts we should let go.  Society has many ways of convincing us that we should feel emotion when we shouldn’t and shouldn’t feel emotion when we should.  Oy vey!  This keeps the illusion, and our false self, thriving.

 

Giving the Projection Back

In Jane’s case, a priest or perhaps her parents might now be squirming with guilt that appears to have no cause.  Jane is no longer accepting their projection.  It has boomeranged back to the source. This is how the notion of karma started. It’s not a physical punishment for bad behavior.  It’s a mental condition whereby a projected belief gets returned to the source.  It’s divine justice.

Jane’s situation is common with emotions that we label shame, guilt, grief, fear of punishment, or retribution, as well as emotions like hope or excitement; they’re all emotions that usually began with beliefs in someone else’s mind. We either believed them because we felt we had to or because we wanted to.  We just forgot to let their beliefs go when they weren’t useful anymore.  But it’s never too late to let go.

Life would slowly return to perfection if those who held false beliefs also felt their own emotions.  We’d witness the true art of cause and effect as it was designed to be lived.  We’d all be creative and wise.  We’d no longer believe the illusion, and it would dissolve.  We’d all be free.