Standing Up For Your True Self

The north star is your true Self.

By Cathy Eck

 

More Level Confusion

A topic came up in a recent mentoring session, and it is a real goldmine.  Understanding how to stand up for your True Self can take years off your journey. Before I unraveled this confusion in myself, I felt as if I were living in hell.  It is yet another tricky form of level confusion.

 

The True Self

Your True Self is the part of you that is true, unchangeable, and eternal.  It has no opposite.  When you are being your True Self, life flows; you feel on purpose and invincible.  If you’ve not been in this place for a long time because you’ve been on sabatical in the illusion, it shows up as a longing.  Some common words that describe this state are freedom (my favorite), peace, beauty, unconditional love, truth, wisdom, creativity, joy, and infinity.

Your True Self is not about what you do.  It is the part of us that must lead the way.  When I’m free, anything I do is joyful.  When my True Self isn’t leading the way, whatever I do is hard work.  Life from the True Self perspective is inspired.  There are no decisions, no shoulds, no practices, no techniques or tools necessary to get you going or make life work.

In the words of Lady Gaga, “You were born this way.”  This is your NORTH STAR.  If you look in the sky, the north star is constant, fixed.  It doesn’t move.  To the ancient stargazers, it was immortal because it didn’t come and go (birth and death) like the other characters in the sky.

 

The Illusion

The illusion is a world of opposites, and most of us are born to people who are already card carrying members of the illusion.  They are firmly entrenched in the false self.  They long for their True Self, but they view that longing as impossible to achieve;  if religious, they believe they’ll see their True Self when they die in heaven.

Your bouncing new True Self looks beautiful to them at birth when you are helpless and submissive, but as it starts to rub against their illusion, it slowly looks like something to be fixed.  So they start to teach you to fit in their perspective.  Some people adjust pretty well; others never adjust.

Those who adjust and even come to like the illusion (often because they believe they are winning) don’t want out.  Others see it as wrong to leave the illusion, like it is cheating at life.  Some feel that a good life on earth means hell after death.  Those are all lies that can be let go.

In the illusion, people follow dreams and desires too.  But those false desires have opposites.  For example, a young child loves getting attention; they become an actor.  Their desire is attention, and they get it.  But they can’t turn it off when they go to the grocery store.  They hate the paparazzi.  They miss having a peaceful life, the True Self.  Our True desires have no opposite, no downside.

False self desires are usually about fixing an insecurity or lack.  People desire money because they believe in lack.  They desire approval because they feel insignicant, bad or unworthy.  If you fix the cause, false desires disappear.

 

Standing Up For Your North Star

Once you know your True Self (North Star), you must stand up for it until you escape the illusion.  During that time, all the events and metaphorical personalities that convinced you that your True Self was impractical, out-of-this-world, problematic, bad, wrong, or just plain selfish will come out of hiding to pull you back.  You must face this personal apocalypse as you stand up for your True Self.

Most people use false self techniques and go to battle, but they never win.  They just wear out and die.  You stand up for your True Self by letting go of anything that another says or does that doesn’t feel good.  The others are only playing a role assigned by your false self so it can stay in power.  They are showing you the beliefs you still have in your mind that are blocking your True Self.  In truth, they are doing you a favor.

Here is where many people get caught.  You commit to total freedom, and suddenly your mother becomes a Christian Fundamentalist.  She wants you to get saved. Getting saved soothed her fear of hell, but it feels horrible to you.  That is all the proof you need that she acted from a false self belief.  But you say no, and she lays on the guilt.  Now you are confused.  You don’t want to hurt or disrespect your mother, but you don’t want to join her religion.  It may even appear that denying her request is imposing your beliefs on her.

Saying no upsets her because it exposes her belief in hell.  She soothed her belief with another belief; but now that you won’t honor her soothing belief, the causal belief is raw and in her face.  Some part of her knows that she hasn’t really fixed the problem, but she doesn’t know how to let go.  She wants to blame you for her emotions.  If you take the blame, you drown with her.  When two people are drowning, no one gets saved.  You must stand up for your True Self and allow her to join you or not.

You must recognize that hell is not true; it doesn’t feel good.  If you believe her or obey her, you’ll both lose.  If she lets go of her causal belief in hell, she’ll also be free.  The key is to notice which person offers the true win-win.  Fixing emotions is never a win.  Her religion adds beliefs to your mind; your freedom frees her mind.  Win-win is the perfect bridge to the True Self.  It is the key to standing up for our True Self.

 

All roads lead to the notion of good and evil, read more here.