When Letting Go Doesn’t Appear to Work

When Letting Go Doesn't appear to work

By Cathy Eck

 

Often, people fear that letting go isn’t working because they’re not getting physical results.  Letting go is all about creating a mental shift.  Physical changes are a bi-product of letting go, not the purpose of it.  Always keep score based on your mental state.  Does your mind feel more clear?  Are you more at peace?  Do you recognize that your emotions are helping you discriminate?

Related to this issue are questions like these.  “How does one know if they’ve let go?”  “How does letting go happen?”  “Help me, Cathy, I don’t know what to let go.”

 

Letting Go Always Works

If we have no beliefs, we can’t create a false experience.  Our problems, pain, and emotions remind us to let go; but they don’t often tell us what to let go.  Let me give you an example.

Someone has a disease that a medical doctor has labeled “incurable.”  They believe doctors cure disease.  They also have a belief that diseases are true and given to us by God as lessons or punishment.  Their mother thinks they’re bad because they’re gay.  They believe their mother is their authority.   So they think their disease is punishment for being gay.  This represents a complex of beliefs.  Their disease won’t leave until they let go of most of this complex.  If they hold on to any of these false beliefs, that belief can provide the platform for their disease to continue to thrive.

If we discriminate, we’ll feel emotion when we think any of the above statements.  Complexes can be very tricky.  Lots of subtext will arise as we let go of beliefs that we’ve considered true in the past.  We might hear voices that try to get us to feel guilt or shame for letting such things go.  We might fear loneliness if we make ourselves too different.  The voices might say that letting go isn’t working; it will try to get us to fix the effect of the problem or look for a rescuer.  It isn’t just the directly-obvious beliefs that cause our problems.  Consequently, I push people who want their life to change to let go of everything.

You can’t screw this up.  You can’t let go of the truth.

 

Did I Really Let Go?

If we really let go, we won’t think the belief again.  More important, we won’t be looking for an answer to our problem or someone to save us from it.  We also won’t be trying to keep the problem away with prayers, lucky incantations, or superstitions.  It can take a lot of work to get to the free perspective.  But when we completely let something go, we don’t have to do it ever again.

We’ll forget we ever had the problem.  It feels like we dreamed it.

You can’t fake letting go.  You either did it or you didn’t.  Lots of teachers, gurus, politicians, and speakers appear to be very spiritual, unemotional, and free; but we only see them in the masculine role.  They’re always on stage or in the pulpit.  We look up to these people, which lifts them up to false heights.  Then we live in their shadow, and their shadow isn’t pretty.  We think there’s something wrong with us.

If one is playing a masculine role, they’re free of a belief when they no longer see it in themselves or those who are feminine to them.  If they’re a preacher who sees sinners, the sinner is still suppressed in them.  If they’re a teacher who has stupid or bad students, the judgment of stupidity or disobedience is within their mind.  The challenge of the masculine role is to never give beliefs to others or project beliefs on them.

However, if we’re playing a feminine role, we’ve submitted our creative authority to others who appear superior to us.  We must be careful that we don’t blindly believe these authorities.  In the feminine role, we’re constantly challenged by others who think they know what’s true for us.  The challenge of the feminine role is to feel, discriminate, and never blindly make another’s words our truth.

 

Roles Are Key

As you can see, roles are played in reverse in the illusion.  Those in masculine roles believe it’s their duty to tell others what to believe.  Parents, teachers, doctors, politicians, and clergy all tell others what to believe.  They think we don’t know the truth; we have to learn it.  Likewise, we’re taught to blindly believe authority, even when what they say feels bad.  We’re forced to respect people who don’t deserve respect.

These two psychological reversals are at the core of the whole illusion deception.  That deception causes all the suffering, poverty, pain, and disease on this planet.  None of it would exist if people did three things:

1) Didn’t believe anything another said that felt bad (feminine role).  They trusted their emotions over authority.

2) Never imposed or projected a belief on another (masculine role).

3)  Let go of all second-cause beliefs that they’ve accepted from others in the past.  Second cause beliefs contain judgment — good/evil, right/wrong, superior/inferior, etc.

That’s it.  Number three takes time.  Sadly, it isn’t done in a weekend workshop.  But we all have the ability to do it.  To let go of the illusion is the greatest service we can provide the planet and others.  It doesn’t even cost a thing.

It’s painful to see how many beliefs we’ve accepted.  Exiting the illusion is like finding our way out of a labyrinth; we must let go of what doesn’t work so we can find what does.  If we’re still clinging to our past practices and techniques that haven’t worked, we won’t find the exit.

Letting go, unlike other practices, has an end.  Letting beliefs go reveals our True Self.  If the process appears slow or ineffective, it’s because the false self still has too much power.  Be persistent; let go of whatever you can.  In time, you’ll be rewarded with the revelation of your True Self — pure freedom.

 

One thought on “When Letting Go Doesn’t Appear to Work

  1. danny says:

    Thank you Cathy, may 2014 will fill you with more letting go and to know more about our true self

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