A Different View of the Story of the Tower of Babel

Tower of Babel

By Cathy Eck

 

The Lord’s Version

Today is my 200th post.  In honor of that milestone, I thought I’d write about my favorite fucked-up Bible story, the Tower of Babel.  It’s sad that the Tower of Babel story was so distorted; it’s really a beautiful, meaningful story.  I intend to demonstrate how shifting our perspective can transform even the most confusing and disempowering stories.  Here’s the story from Ye Ole King James Bible Genesis 11:

1 And the whole earth was of one language, and of one speech.

2 And it came to pass, as they journeyed from the east, that they found a plain in the land of Shinar; and they dwelt there.

3 And they said one to another, Go to, let us make brick, and burn them thoroughly. And they had brick for stone, and slime had they for morter.

4 And they said, Go to, let us build us a city and a tower, whose top may reach unto heaven; and let us make us a name, lest we be scattered abroad upon the face of the whole earth.

5 And the Lord came down to see the city and the tower, which the children of men builded.

6 And the Lord said, Behold, the people is one, and they have all one language; and this they begin to do: and now nothing will be restrained from them, which they have imagined to do.

7 Go to, let us go down, and there confound their language, that they may not understand one another’s speech.

8 So the Lord scattered them abroad from thence upon the face of all the earth: and they left off to build the city.

9 Therefore is the name of it called Babel; because the Lord did there confound the language of all the earth: and from thence did the Lord scatter them abroad upon the face of all the earth.

 

The Lord

The error begins when we mistake Lord for the Creator God.  The God of Genesis I was a Creator (or creative force); after Genesis I, God became the angry, judgmental, power-hungry inventor of man’s false self and knowledge of good and evil.  The rest of the Old Testament is mostly about life in the Lord’s illusion where rules, beliefs, and false Gods rule.  It’s about reward and punishment for the Lord’s benefit, not for the benefit of the people or the earth.

This is a very important story.  Lord is still ruling the earth today.

 

The People

Lord recognizes that the children building the Tower of Babel communicate very well; they’re a powerful creative force — like the real God that Lord despises.  So Lord says:  “now nothing will be restrained from them, which they have imagined to do.”  Lord is threatened.  He’s saying, “I can’t control these people.  They’re true creators.  Who will build my castles and shine my bling?”  His power depends on obedient slaves.

Lord decides to confound their language or speech, because Lord is an ass.  He presumes that their outer communication created their unity.  Different ways of speaking don’t unite or divide.

What did he mean?  Common vision unites us.  Beliefs divide us.  We accept beliefs only when our emotions are confounded.  The truth has no emotional component.  Beliefs are loaded with emotion, but we’re confounded to psychologically reverse our discrimination so we accept thoughts that feel horrible.  Then we create in the image and likeness of Lord, not God.

Lord confounded our universal language — our natural discrimination system so we wouldn’t know the difference between truth and beliefs (false).  Lord made the children’s True Self behavior wrong.

At the True Self level, we’re all one.  We think in harmony.  At the false self (belief) level, we’re separate; we’re designed that way.  Authorities, at all levels, behave like Lord.  Most of us experienced a Tower of Babel moment before we we’re able to talk.

This story reinforces some horrible beliefs, like authority figures have more power than our own True Self.  It convinces us to drop our desires and submit to the desires of authority (supporting the illusion).  We fear that our True Self is bad or wrong.  We even fear joy because we believe punishment will follow.  Lies, lies, lies…but the beliefs of many appear true.  But they aren’t true; they’re just reality.

False leaders “Divide and Conquer.”  If we’re separated into different religions, political parties, races, or sexual preferences, the completely unqualified, but highly focused, elite Lords easily rule the world.

 

It’s Not Pride

The religious believe this is a story of pride based on Verse 4, “Let us make us a name.”  Bullshit!  Harmony is never prideful. Making a name wasn’t prideful because their intention was pure.  They were caught in the illusion and wanted to get back to Heaven to speak with their True God, which is a metaphor for wanting to return to their True Self perspective.  The story says they feared separation.  Separation is the consequence of accepting the false self, belief-driven perspective, of their Lord.

Here’s a little Jeopardy test:  “This was a prideful one who falsely accused his followers of being prideful.”  “Alex, that would be ‘What is Lord?'”  Yes!  This story was an example of projection.  Lord projected his own disgusting pride on the innocent children.

 

All One

I communicate with people from all over the world, representing different races, ages, sexual preferences, religions, and political perspectives.  On the way into the illusion, we all look very different.  But on the way out, the differences drop, and we start harmonizing; we see eye to eye.  It constantly amazes me.

We do have one language — emotions.  Our God-given emotional communication system discriminates between lies and truth.  Those who lie don’t want us to know that because discrimination is REAL power.  Emotions (once we remove our psychological reversals) tell us when we’re living in or returning to Heaven on Earth and when we’re hell bound.  They provide divine communication that’s flawless; they dump Lord off his pedestal, complete the Tower of Babel, and reconnect Heaven and Earth.

4 thoughts on “A Different View of the Story of the Tower of Babel

  1. Toeknee says:

    This is a very sweet story. I had never appreciated the Tower of Babel story from such a perspective before I read it here. It explains how divide et impera (divide and conquer) helps maintain oppressive systems. Just keep reminding people of their differences and why they shouldn’t trust ‘the other’. Very lovely story.

  2. LOVE this! Love, love, love!!

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