Help! I Can’t Find the F***ing Causal Belief

Beliefs can't find the cause

By Cathy Eck

 

Not a day goes by that I don’t hear, “Help Cathy, I can’t find my fucking belief.  I know it’s there because my life sucks or my body is screaming in pain.  But I can’t find the belief.”  There are many reasons why this happens.  Shit, I sometimes say it to myself.  Here are some of the most obvious and common reasons and fixes:

 

1)  The belief is hiding under what I call a “protector” belief.  Our false mind wants to live forever; it fears death and exposure.  When the protector is on duty, our mind is generating thoughts like:  “I can’t find the belief.”  “This is too hard.”  “I can’t do this.”  Those are protector beliefs that guard the causal belief.  Our false mind is trying to get us to stop letting go.  If we let go of these distracting protective beliefs, the causal belief often can be seen.

2)  The belief looks like it’s absolutely true.  It could be a belief that we’ve had forever.  It might be a collective belief that we know nearly everyone else believes.  It might be a belief that has created in our reality many times.  Remember, our reality up until this second was created by that causal belief.  If we let it go completely, our reality will change.  It has to.  An example of such a belief is, “Dad will never change.” Yes, that has been true until now, but it’s a belief.  Dad does have a True Self; and if we connect with that True Self, he can change.  These beliefs tend to feel like walls that we can’t get around until we go through them.

3)  We can’t bear to feel anymore emotion, so we keep distracting ourself.   Beliefs generate emotion.  Long standing beliefs are laced with lots of emotion.  Our false mind will try to tell us that the emotion means the belief is true; it’s lying.  That’s its job.  Sometimes, we just have to face the belief and all that emotion with courage.  We have to outlast it.  We’re becoming masters of our minds.  It isn’t the easiest thing we’ve ever done.   It can be like a war; and we need to win every battle.

4)  We’re still feminine to the person who inserted the belief into our mind.  We have physical symptoms, and we can hear the doctor’s voice saying the diagnosis.  We feel emotion when we hear his/her words, but we still view the doctor as powerful and knowing.  We fear going to hell, and we know it’s false; but we still view our mother or the priest as our authority.  To be free, we must have no masters other than our True Self.  This is about letting go of false gods.  Our True Self always has an answer and always knows what’s right for us.  But if we’re listening to others, we won’t hear it.  Often we hear religious voices saying listen to God.  Our True Self is God.  The voices we hear in our mind that sound like mom, dad, and the priest/preacher are false gods.

5)  We’ve got a conditioned response that masks the belief.  For example, we have a saying that we use to sooth ourself like, “Everything happens for a reason.”  “God has a plan.”  Or we do something conditioned like go for a run or kneel and pray.  Our conditioned responses show us what we believe.  We do them to ease the emotion (fix the effect) that the active belief is spewing.  Get rid of the belief, and we no longer need to fix the effect.

6)  We want to keep the belief.  Often our belief has a payoff.  We want to get rid of the pain, but we get a lot of attention for it.  We don’t like drama, but it’s how we relate to our friends; and we want to star on a reality television show.  I’ve worked with actors who believe they need their past emotions to act; they don’t, but try to tell them that.  We can’t hold on and let go at the same time.  Sometimes freedom is simply a choice.

7)  We feel no emotion when thinking an unwanted thought.  We’ve hit a psychological reversal.  So switch directions.  Think the opposite.  For example, you keep thinking, “I don’t make enough money.”  There’s no emotion.  It just feels like harsh reality.  So switch to the positive side of it.  “I make all the money I need.”  Ah, the emotion comes pouring out saying, “Good try.  That was a false line if I ever heard one.”  Many of us are painfully honest people.  We speak about reality too much.  My advice on that is to talk less, let go more.  The reality will shift; then you can talk again.

8)  We’re in other people’s minds.  We’re looking at what another said or did and wondering about their thinking when what matters is our thinking.  A man cuts us off in traffic.  We wonder why he did that?  That keeps us from watching our own mind.  We don’t notice that we have fear of bad drivers or judge angry people because our energy and attention is devoted to the driver’s mind.  Bring your attention back to your thinking.  Western meditation is great for this.  Their thinking is their own problem.

9)  We’re reasoning.  We don’t need a reason for why something happened.  What we need is the causal belief.  If  we’re reasoning, we’re too much in our logical false masculine mind.  If we drop into feeling, and just witness our emotions while listening to our thoughts, we’ll find the causal belief in our mind, which is the only reason we need.

 

The biggest trap is looking at what normal people do and thinking we can do that too and get free.  Most people, regardless of what they say they want, are on the express train to hell.  We have to remember that fitting in means riding the hell-bound train.  Freedom means getting off at the next stop.

 

 

I Want Freedom BUT I Already Fixed That

Freedom from emotions

By Cathy Eck

 

People are becoming more and more aware of the illusion; they hide from it, vent about it, or feel like they’re stuck in a prison with no parole.  No wonder so many people are depressed.  Others fight the illusion or rebel against it, but they never win.  Why are we so afraid of this giant cartoon?

You see, if we’re bothered by another person’s illusion, it has taken up residence in our OWN mind.  Freedom is about destroying the beliefs in OUR mind that have cast us into roles in other people’s illusions.  We must realize that their illusion can’t affect us if we don’t believe it.  If we believe that we MUST fix another person or get them to see they’re wrong so we can be free, we still share their belief.  The more we let go, the more clear this becomes.

 

Fear Rules the Illusion

Letting go allows us to see that we’re all victims of the illusion; we’re not really victims of each other.  If we’re getting something we don’t want from another or from life, we believe that what we got is real or true; or we believe that the person who cast us in the feminine role has power over us.  Getting free requires using our emotions to go inside our mind and find our causal beliefs.

People want guns because they fear other people are bad and could harm them.  People join religions because they fear their soul was stained — they want a better afterlife or next life.  People adopt diets, exercise routines, or practices because they fear death, aging, weight problems, or illness.  People follow authority because they fear punishment.  People take jobs they hate because they fear being without money or believe they need the benefits.  Most of our doing is simply to counteract fear and paranoia.  It’s not creative.

Paranoia and fear make us vulnerable to clever marketing.  In fact, we can often see our beliefs by looking at what we’re tempted to buy.  We wouldn’t want to fix the problem if we didn’t still believe we had it.  You can be sure that the minute we fix one illusory fear, someone will find something else to scare the shit out of us  Then they sell us yet another product or service.  We win when we no longer believe we need anything from another — that’s freedom.

The True Self has no emotion because it holds no beliefs; the false self is filled with beliefs and emotions.  Emotions are the effect, not the cause.  So if we think we need a gun, we need to look at the beliefs causing our fear of other people.  If we think we need religion, we need to follow our fear of sin to the causal religious beliefs.  If we think we need our partner to spend more time with us, we must follow our emotion to our loneliness.  If we think we need a food or exercise regimen, we should follow our fear of illness or fat to find the causal beliefs that were probably learned from an expert.  As we let go, we’re relieving the experts, which have ruled our lives, of their duty.

Often we think that mental solutions fix the cause.  We’re attracted to spiritual teachers, mental techniques, and practices like positive thinking, visualization, meditation, yoga, Tai chi, EFT, new religions, hypnosis, or NLP because they seem to put new and improved beliefs in our mind or relieve our emotions.  Sometimes we grasp a moment of clear sight, which causes us to let go.  But that is rare and often not easily repeatable.  We eventually grow tired of these techniques too.  Now we’re ready to let go.

By the time that we realize this, we’re often exhausted.  We’ve tried so many things.  We have no desire to do much of anything; and that’s good.  We’re finally tired of fixing problems.   Fortunately, it doesn’t take physical energy to let go.  But it takes desire, persistence, and courage.  Then we see the horrible truth.  We meet all the things we thought we fixed because we didn’t fix the cause; we fixed the effects.  That’s a real “Oh FUCK!” moment.  It looks like we’re going backwards before we can go forward; this causes many people to quit letting go before they even get started unless they understand what’s going on.

 

Getting to Freedom

To get to freedom, we have to heighten our awareness of our own mental processing by witnessing our thinking.  We observe what we’re driven to do and constantly ask ourselves why we’re doing it.  We stop living on automatic.  We must get painfully honest with ourselves; and stop looking for others to fix our emotions and problems.  And we must stop fixing the emotions and problems of others.

“Why?” becomes our best friend.  Why am I feeling that I need to do this, be this, or want this?  Why do I think I need this product, practice, or person?  The answer points to the cause; and it won’t feel good.  But you now know that you were doing all that work or spending all that money only to fix a stupid belief that didn’t even feel good.

We have to realize that every time we fix the effect, we give the causal belief more power.   And that’s why we often feel so much emotion when we stop fixing the effects.  We’ve been covering that emotion with products, practices, or practitioners for a long time.  It’s like going cold turkey with an addiction.  Actually, the biggest addiction on this planet is fixing the effects of our beliefs to eliminate our emotional discomfort.  Nearly everyone has that addiction.   We thought we desired the thing that fixes the effect, but all those emotions were just begging us to remove the causal belief.  When we remove the false belief, the false desire disappears as well.  We won’t see that particular problem again.

 

 

Excitement and Tears of Joy

Excitement, Tears of Joy

By Cathy Eck

I’m often asked about excitement and tears of joy.  In both cases, an emotion appears to be positive until we take a closer look.

 

The Gift of Emotions

Our emotions were designed to let us know when we’re thinking something false.  We think; then we get feedback.  If that feedback is emotion, then what we just thought was false.  That thought won’t take us to our true desires.  It will take us deeper into the illusion of pain, suffering, and problems.

This gets confusing in relationships.  Often, we’re listening to another; and we feel emotion when we take their false thought or belief into our body-mind.  If we don’t let their belief go, it sits there accumulating power; and it keeps us from getting what we want in life.  We don’t realize we have this belief; and often it’s revealed in excitement or tears of joy.  But we don’t catch the opportunity to let it go because society tells us these are positive emotions.

For most of us, we don’t realize how many beliefs we’ve accepted into our body-mind until we start letting go; it’s the supreme, “Oh fuck,” moment in life.  We focus on letting go of beliefs that generate “negative” emotion, but emotion isn’t positive or negative.  It always means the same thing; what we’re thinking right now is false.  Excitement and tears of joy aren’t positive emotions; but they’re emotions.  They’re a form of psychological reversal that looks positive; consequently, they can be difficult to decode once labeled.  We don’t want to let them go if we label them positive.

 

Excitement

Excitement is a label that we give to emotion when we associate it with something we want.  The guy or girl we like smiles at us.  We get an interview for the job we desire.  We think the emotion is related to the good news.  But the emotion is coming from what lies beneath the good news.  The event triggered our beliefs which generated the emotion.  We need to turn inward and watch our mind to see what’s actually causing the emotion.  The belief might be something like, “I never believed this would happen.”  “This is too good to be true.”  “I don’t deserve this.”  We don’t want those beliefs in our mind.  They’re false.  The beliefs could be triggering what appears to be guilt or shame if we’re conditioned to gravitate toward pain or martyrdom.  Some might fear it’s a temptation by Satan.  We want to let go of whatever we discover.

Maybe something already happened that’s generating excitement.  Let’s say we won the lottery.  That excitement might mean that we just got a false desire, or we have beliefs about lottery winners becoming selfish.  Our True Self is giving us fair warning.  We could be headed for trouble if we don’t let go.  In the moment, we focus on the outer event; we don’t hear what our mind is saying.  We don’t recognize the cause of the emotional response.  If we find the cause of the emotion, we just might avoid something bad in the future.

The most dangerous false interpretation of excitement is when it’s really fear.  If we fear something, it’s wise to let go of the cause of that fear, not head straight into the fear and call it excitement.  That’s just asking for trouble.

 

True Desire

When we fulfill a true desire, the normal reaction is more like, “That makes sense.”  If we have no beliefs, it’s obvious that the desire will come to us.  We won’t be all nervous and jumpy about it.  When we’ve been letting go, we notice the improvement in our mind; and by the time that we get our desire, it just seems logical that it would happen that way.

Many people believe and teach that emotions are creative.  This came from ancient occult teachings.  But think about that.  If emotions create our life, and we aren’t in a position where we can project the potential unwanted manifestations on to others (because we aren’t an authority figure), then it’s just a matter of time before our fears manifest.  When we use our emotions backwards; our life is like riding ocean waves.  We’ll get excited and happy when we get what we want and depressed and fearful when we don’t.  We’ll always be in a state of emotion; we’ll just label our emotional state different based on what just happened.

People often challenge me on this.  They say, “I don’t want to give up excitement.”  But they don’t realize that keeping excitement means keeping the other half of the triangle bottom, disappointment.

 

Tears of Joy

Tears of Joy are the product of very strong emotional reaction.  But it’s not the joy that’s producing the tears.  Perhaps we’re watching a movie and lovers find each other after years of being apart.  We say we’re joyful in their reunion.  So why do we cry?  Emotion always means our thoughts are false.  We have to turn inward again and watch our mind to know why.  Maybe we’re thinking, “I wish I had love like that.”  “I wish I could find my lost love.”

We’re happy that they got what they desired; but we’re sad that we aren’t getting what we want.   They’re tears of sadness or disappointment about our life, not joy for them.  We don’t see this because we’re not watching our mind when we have tears of joy.  We’re looking outside of us at something we see or hear.  Our attention is on something good or wanted; but our mind is thinking something false.  It’s a trick.

 

In my experience, watching my mind during the tears of joy or excitement often reveals causal beliefs that explains why I’ve not fulfilled my desires.  They’re liking finding a diamond.  If I turn my focus inward, and let go of the false thought or belief, the tears of joy or excitement go quickly.   And I’m one step closer to freedom and fulfilling my own true desires.

 

Labels: The Seeming True Self Destroyer (Part I)

Ambigram NO Labels NO Lies

By Cathy Eck

 

NO LABELS, NO LIES

If you’ve been reading this blog, you know that beliefs are disruptive lies that come disguised as the truth.  That’s why we accept them into our mind without discriminating.  We give others our beliefs with the intention of controlling or helping them because we can’t see beyond the belief to recognize that it’s false.  Labels are simply a collection of beliefs that we either hate or love.  Like beliefs, we often accept them without discrimination.

To escape the illusion, we must have precision in our words.  That precision supports us in seeing the difference between something illusory and something true.  The triangle process is a good way to develop word precision.  It helps us get real and identify what’s truly happening when words are exchanged.

The meaning of words is often reversed or confused in the illusion.  Beliefs are treated as if they’re true.  The false God is treated as the Creator; occult is confused with initiation.  Goodness, in the illusion, becomes obedience to authority.  Winning morphs into success when another loses.  The illusion is all about level confusion.

Labels beg for word precision.  If you don’t have word precision, you confuse and harm others.  We do to others what was done to us until we recognize that what was done to us was false.  People in the illusion label people for eternity.  They say, “You’re incurable.”  You’re a victim of wackadoodle disease.”  “You’re an idiot.”  “You’re ugly.”  “You’re fat.”  “You’re a Smith and will always be a Smith.”  “You’re an Asian, gay, or Hispanic.”  The one label that would not harm us, we rarely use, “You’re a human being.”

Labels also go the other direction, which is just as bad and more seductive.  “You’re a genius.”  “You’re beautiful.”  “You’re the Dali Lama.”  “You’re a saint.” or “You’re an old soul.”

Then there are the labels that we give ourselves.  After I sold my technology business, I decided I wanted to go naked — not without clothes — without labels.  People would, of course, ask me what I did.  I’d say, “Nothing.”  No one could accept that.  “Are you a housewife?  A mother?  A retiree?  A homeless person?  A fucking antisocial idiot?”  They wanted me to own a label dammit.

Eventually, we figure that if we’re going to get labeled anyway, we’d better label ourself.  “I’m an artist.”  “I’m a Muslim.”  “I’m a sufferer of wackadoodle disease.”  You watch, someone labeled hypochondriac will think they have that disease!  “I’m a fighter for truth.”  “I’m an engineer.”  “I’m shy.”  The very way we speak labels by saying “I am” or “You are” gives them permanence, making change difficult or impossible.

 

Labels Can Feel Like Murder

We must choose our wording carefully when discussing labels.  When someone asks what I do?  I answer in a temporary way.  Currently I mentor people and write.  In that way, I’m not defined by my current activity.  But our friends and family are often unkind and more permanent in choosing their labels.  They say,  “You’re so…..  You’re a ……  You always …..  You never…..”  They believe that what they see in us is true; it’s not.

I learned to watch my language carefully in business.  If I defined someone by their errors, I’d destroy a very good employee.  With my children, I learned the same lesson.   I didn’t want to ruin my perfect child.  In the masculine role, I had to discriminate between true and false constantly.  It took lots of practice.  We all behave as false selves at times.  We live in a fucking false world.  That’s reality.  But that isn’t who we are.

I learned that the truth looked like this, “You’re acting irresponsible today.”  The person was acting in a false way.  If it was my projection, the situation went away.  I avoided breaking my precious mirror.  If they were asking for help without knowing it, I offered help.  Often people do shitty things to us or behave in ridiculous ways because they’re asking for help without knowing it.  Letting go and then speaking in this way healed 80% of the situations.  The others were not correctable by me because they showed me something that they were reflecting for someone else in their life.  They wanted me to fix their handler; and I couldn’t do that.  But I could help them let go from the feminine role.

But one caution, this isn’t about saying the prettier words.  It’s about knowing the person isn’t inherently what they’re doing in this moment.

 

You Are vs. You Are Acting

You are acting… is a statement that opens the door to discover causal beliefs.  We can’t fix or find the cause of a problem if we think the problem is true — truth is immortal.  We don’t make friends or love someone by labeling them in a permanent way with “You are…”  We put them up against a wall when we do that.  No one can fix or change the truth.  We must admit something is false to let it go.  That is the secret of letting go.  Knowing that the words we thought or heard weren’t true.

If a doctor says, “You’re incurable,” find a new doctor.  If a teacher labels you ADD, get a new teacher.  If your preacher projects his sin on you, for God’s sake run like hell and find your True Self.  Sadly, people marinate in the soupy projection  of false masculine roles until they believe that the stone cast upon them was deserved.  It changes them forever and locks them into the illusion without an exit.  The only way to escape the label is to realize that it’s false.   We were just not acting like ourselves.  Or the person who said it was seeing their own reflection.

Once we realize that we’re just an actor, we can release the role we’ve played.  We can return to our own life path and find the happy ending to OUR own story.  We don’t have to live with our labels anymore.

Trusting Ourselves: Letting Go of Authority

Freedom and WTF

By Cathy Eck

 

What’s Freedom?

When we’re a child, freedom is turning twenty-one.  If we don’t love our work, freedom is retirement.  When we’re unhappily married, freedom is divorce.  If things get really bad, we’ll even think freedom is death.  But freedom isn’t any of that.

In initiation, freedom was about the return to the True Self.  It was called the second birth because we’re born a True Self, we fall, and then we strive to get back to the place we were initially.  Initiation wasn’t a ceremony where a false authority labeled you SAVED!  That’s actually a good joke because initiation was actually freedom from false authority.

The initiated one felt and honored their emotional warnings.  They never fell into feminine roles below a false authority.  In other words, they had the Holy Grail.  Their mind represented the alchemical marriage because they’d united their masculine and feminine mind aspects.  They’d passed through the Gateway to Gold.  And Heaven had returned to earth for them.

People have spoken the truth in many ways.  Once we understand one of them, we’ll eventually understand all of them.  But they’ll all look mysterious until we get the right point-of-view.  Illusions stay alive by making sure that we never get the true perspective of life.  Finding our True Self requires constant letting go of the false contents of our mind until only our unique perspective of the truth remains.

 

The Mistake

How do we get off course?  We follow another’s path instead of walking our own.  Initiation is simple in theory, but so hard to do.  We must let go of other people’s perspectives and expertise until all that’s left is our own.

It’s hard because since we were born, we were told to respect…never challenge…just follow other people’s beliefs, especially if they’re an authority or expert.  If they’re a spiritual leader, we often find they have a tight hold on our mind.  There are many paths to the truth, but there’s only one that works for each of us.  No one else’s path will work for us.

Our path is marked with the things that we find most interesting.  In this way, we’re self-motivated.  Others can support us along our path, but they don’t define it.

People often want me to say that their teacher/guru is the ONE.  But I won’t sell out on them.  They have a path that’s far more perfect for them.  It’s my job to support them in letting go of all the wrong paths from their past.  I know that in the end, only one will remain.  They won’t have to choose anymore.  It will be perfect.

 

False Authority

The false authority uses ancient, proven techniques to retain followers.  But in their defense, they don’t realize they’re harming us.  They’re also victims of the illusion.

  • They speak some truth and some beliefs.  When we find our truth, we will spice it up with some beliefs.  But those beliefs are spice, not the meal.  The spice is only right for us.
  • They assume the masculine role, and we feel completely feminine to them.  When we’re in a false feminine role, we feel like a powerless child who doesn’t have the right to go against whatever their authority says.
  • They fix effects not causes.
  • They focus on physical results instead of mental purity.  They often tell us we need willpower.
  • They think money, fame, or power give you freedom.  In truth, freedom often brings us money, fame, and power, but freedom (truth) must come first.
  • They tell us to “accept what is” when “what is” isn’t appealing because “what is” came from their beliefs.
  • They tell us God gave them success, which implies that if we haven’t yet succeeded we’ve been overlooked by God.
  • They say, “You can’t change the past.”  Bullshit!  When we let go of the causal belief in our mind, we change our memory of any past reality.
  • They say, “Life is suffering.”  Does that really feel good?  It only feels good if you’re heartless and think you can rise above suffering (like the gurus/teachers/preachers that say it) while watching others swim in the the sewage of beliefs.
  • They’re focused on looking good, not being truly good.
  • They generate emotions in us like hope, excitement, pride, or tears of joy.  All emotions mean that there’s false in our mind or in the speaker’s words.  Often the false is implied.  We must look under the words if we feel emotion.  When we mislabel emotion as good, we’re toast.  I had someone in my life that labeled lying good.  He said he did so because “the truth hurts.”  In his presence, my truthfulness was evil or hurtful.  I’d feel bad because I wasn’t lying.  WTF?
  • They demand R-E-S-P-E-C-T.
  • They abuse and take advantage of the feminine role instead of protecting it and lifting it up.  Usually, they don’t understand roles or honor the role’s true purpose of giving and receiving.
  • They deny that emotions have value so we’ll be embarrassed if we expose the fact that what they said doesn’t feel good.
  • They believe their minds are right and don’t discriminate between true and false.  They don’t go for win-win for all.
  • They support and make money from beliefs that never feel good — false spiritual teachings, disease, injustice, borders, war, who’s right, who’s good, who’s superior, what happens after you die, or what will happen in the future.  They take advantage of our insecurities.
  • They believe the feminine role exists to serve the masculine role.

I could add to this list for days.  These are some of the big ones.

Freedom doesn’t come in a weekend workshop.  It mostly comes in small steps.  We’re slowly changing our past every time we let go of even a small belief.  We’re building true power — accepting our True Self back into our own true masculine role.  Letting go of authorities by seeing the errors in their teachings creates big leaps.  It’s the fastest way to the Gateway To Gold.

 

 

Roles: Internal and External

Roles in our mind

By Cathy Eck

 

False Self

Our mind works like a movie projector to create our view of the world.  We experience what we’re projecting with our body.  If we only had a True Self, we’d live in the Garden of Eden.  But watching fruit grow on trees is boring.  So we create stories.

Reality equals the True Self plus our Beliefs (false self)

A good metaphor for the false self (as designed) is temporary storage.  The True Self is permanent storage.  One person creates a story within their mind.  This person splits up their mind into multiple characters that interact, but all the characters exist within the story writer’s mind, forming an illusory creative whole.  The storyteller brings that inner creation into the outer world via “The Word.”  At this point, the story writer is done.  Now humans co-create to perform the story, and they’re thrilled to do that because it’s fun, and it’s just a role.  They get to walk in someone else’s shoes for a short time.  Each actor is a valuable part of the whole.  If a few actors don’t show up, the story would dissolve.

Hollywood does this perfectly; it’s a haven for creativity.  Business people also create visions then bring others in to play roles within the vision.  No one is chained to these visions for life.  When they finish their role, they delete the story.  Their minds are virgin again.

Religion is different.  Someone creates  a story, and they make it true.  They cast people into roles that never end.  It’s like the “Hotel California.”  “You can check out anytime you like, but you can never leave.”  Why?  You forgot that you could let go of the role.

We love story.  We don’t care how wild and crazy the story is.  Actors play horrible roles, but they don’t become the characters permanently.  When the role is done, they drop it because they view it as a temporary role — it’s not who they are.

Roles aren’t the problem.  The problem is the belief that we are our roles or that we can’t let them go.  Roles come with beliefs so they cause us to retain beliefs that we don’t need or want.

 

The Illusion

In the illusion, the lead masculine role casts the story and then convinces others that they must play the roles they’re cast in for life.  No wonder we want to die.  They give us the shit roles while they get the A-list parts.  Most people are playing roles in a story that they didn’t create and don’t really like — no great actor would do that.

We came here to create stories and play roles — for sure.  But we don’t have the right to make lifetime roles — that is why the Lifetime channel makes crappy movies.

 

Getting Free of Roles

To get free, we must identify who’s playing the masculine role of the screenplay we’re cast in.  What do they want from us?  What do they define as good or right?  What beliefs have we accepted because of that role?  As we let go of the beliefs around the role, we gradually step back until one day we can see the big picture from the director’s chair.  We see that our role is just a role.  It isn’t our destiny, purpose, or karma.  We don’t have to play it anymore.

Then we’ll see that everyone in the illusory play was an actor, even our worst enemy.  We’ll applaud them, not hate them.  They probably didn’t choose their role either.  Most people today are playing roles cast by their ancestors in a story that was written thousands of years ago.  We’re afraid to quit our roles because we think God gave them to us.  The story writers said their stories were cast by God so we’d accept a role that sucked.  Can you see how fucking stupid that is?

The illusion feels like hell believes everyone identifies with their role.  The think they are a Jew, Christian, or Lightworker.  But they aren’t.  It’s a role.

We don’t let go because we become vested in the story.  Let’s look at the story of Armageddon.  Those who believe that the story was created by God won’t let it go.  They want the story to play out to the end, and they believe that they’ll be the victors in a win-lose drama of epic quality.  They’ve become so absorbed and proud of their role that they don’t feel their own misery.  They have no compassion for those who will lose.

They’ve lost access to their True Self and can’t see beyond the set.  Some people escape but find another role without first becoming free of the old one.  “I’ll take this role where I get to ascend to the stars.  Or I’ll join this religion where I get to live as a monk and not work in a job I hate everyday.”  They’re making a lateral move within the illusion.  They aren’t getting free.  This creates conflicting roles in their mind.

 

Hollywood

The answer is in Hollywood.  We’re all actors.  We take a part in a marriage, culture, religion, business, or political group; and when we’ve had enough, we should simply let go and drop the role without guilt, shame, or fear of judgment.  We’d return to home base — our True Self.

If we want a different role, we first clear out the old role.  We can’t play Forest Gump if we’re still playing Idi Amin.  Once we’ve broken free of old roles, we’re back to zero again.  We’ll choose new roles and only play characters in stories that we love.  We’ll make sure we trust our director.  Or we’ll write our own story.

But what about those collective dramas that have unhappy endings like Monsanto, Armageddon, or businesses that harm the earth.  This answer is on Broadway.  How many actors does a play have to lose before the show can’t go on?  We’re those actors; we can drop our roles and eventually bring down the production.

Letting Go and Children

Masculine and feminine roles

By Cathy Eck

 

Masculine Role Teachers

Once we understand the illusion’s roles, letting go becomes easier.  New Age teachers, clergy, gurus, and pop psychologists are well meaning, but they don’t understand roles.  All the techniques taught in expensive workshops and self-help books came from people who managed to somehow get themselves into the masculine role.  The masculine role is funny.  You feel enlightened because suddenly the emotion leaves your body; it gets projected on your shadow — your students, employees, children, or followers.

The masculine role was designed so that the power was in the role.  That way, one could be a wimpy, little man and rule the world (think Wizard of Oz).  The masculine role is blind; they believe the shadow they see is real.  It isn’t.

Now you’ve entered a new chapter of life or you wouldn’t be reading this.  You’re letting go so you can remember your pure thinking.  If you turn your thinking into a system after you remember it, I’ll kick your ass.  I’m joking!  The True Self has no beliefs to impose on others, and they know everyone has the truth inside them.

 

Why?

Why did you look to those false teachers?  You were trained to do so as children.  You were raised by people who thought you’d be perfect if you thought like them.  That’s the blindness of the masculine role.   We learn it; then we do it to others who are feminine to us.

Today’s parents try to self-help their children.  They’re fixing their own projection.  Kids write to me and beg me to write to their parents.  But that’s not my job.  They must learn to let go from the feminine role.

 

Feminine Role Escape

The last thing to give someone in the feminine role is a masculine technique — like affirmations.  It won’t work for them.  They don’t believe they can change their mind because they’re stuck in a masculine shadow.  If they manage to drag that masculine ass to a self-help workshop, the masculine role will question their sanity.  The masculine mind views itself as positive and shiny already.  They already know this stuff.

The person in the feminine role will emotionally back up like a sewer because they’ll think they must be the problem; they don’t know what they’re doing wrong.  Their mind will run in circles.  They’ll take responsibility for what’s being projected on them, which gets them nowhere.

 

Religious Parents

Religious parents are masters of the false masculine.  The good parent (masculine role) projects their anger on the bad child (feminine role).  The kid goes to school and bullies (projects).  He gets a taste of the masculine role and does to others what was done to him.

The parents says, “I didn’t cause that.”  Yes, they did!

They caused it because they didn’t realize that their child was their shadow reflection.  As soon as the child can work his way into the masculine role, he becomes the good masculine and projects until he finds a mate — someone who can play his powerless feminine.  Roles aren’t true; but they get passed down from generation to generation as if they’re true.  To play the role of our parents feels satisfying because from the child’s point of view, we’ve made it into the role of authority.

Many children psychologically reverse their minds to be good (people pleasers).  They learn to do the opposite of what the parents and teachers are projecting.  They obey the words, and ignore the projection.  They take the parent’s control dramas and turn them into love.  They take punishment and turn it into discipline.  They often say things like “My parents did the best that they could.”  These people will unconsciously repeat the same drama with their children because they’ve relabeled it as good or right.  Once psychologically reversed, the illusory world doesn’t look up-side down anymore.  

There’s a huge price to pay for psychologically reversing our minds.  We can’t experience unconditional love.  I was married to a people pleaser.  When I finally could unconditionally love him and give him total freedom, he thought I hated him.  He was looking for the emotional connection he felt with his family of origin and the earlier version of me, and it wasn’t there anymore.  Emotions only exist in false-love connections.

 

The Exit Ramp

In the exit stage, we redefine roles.  We must become a strong and firm masculine leader to those in the illusion (often our parents).  We must support truth and expose falsehood.  This takes courage.

One Easter, we went to visit my in-laws.  One of my children was excited about the candy that was coming since my mother-in-law had been talking it up.  Suddenly I heard my mother-in-law reprimanding my child for jumping around.  She said, “I’m going to tell the Easter Bunny you’re bad — you don’t deserve candy.”  He looked at her so strange.  He didn’t believe in the Easter Bunny since I told my kids the truth — that it was a story.  But she spoke her words with such conviction that, for a moment, he questioned his truth.

I ran interference for him.  I explained to my mother-in-law that she held the Easter Bunny in mind as a lie — a means of control, not a cute story.  My son gave her a chance to correct her thinking, and she damn well better take it.  I wasn’t mean, but I was firm.  I explained to her that kids jump.  He wasn’t doing anything wrong; he was reflecting the contrived excitement that she projected on him.  She didn’t understand; and I didn’t care.  My child felt protected.

People raised in religion are taught that suffering or sacrifice is the way to God.  They often got punished as children for doing things that kids do.  As parents, they do what was done to them.  That’s sad, but it’s still wrong.  The best advice I can give any parent is before you discipline your children, take the mote your parent’s gave you out of your own eye.