Exposing my Inner Comedian — Comedy is Honest

Steve Kaplan

By Cathy Eck

 

Comedy

I love comedy, but I’m not fond of jokes, silliness, or trickery.  I didn’t understand my perspective of comedy until I found Steve Kaplan.  So when I got an email saying that I could repeat his intensive at a very reduced rate, I jumped on it.

I must explain that if the Dali Lama was at the Starbuck’s across the street, I wouldn’t even twitch my leg.  But for Steve, I happily drove to LA.  I know my truth, but I didn’t know how my truth fit into the world of comedy.  I knew this was the next step in my quest for mental freedom, and I felt inspired to accept the role of student for a weekend.

Steve has done for comedy what I’ve done with beliefs.  Steve has watched endless comedy movies, studied the art of comedy throughout history, and most important, Steve has let go of everything that he thought he knew about comedy so that he could see with fresh eyes and hear with fresh ears.

 

7th Sense

Awhile back, I declared humor to be the seventh sense.  I knew that was true because when I could laugh at my past, I was free of it.  Laughter was like a super power.

According to Steve, humor and truth walk hand-in-hand.  Comedy is honest.  Comedy says what is natural, not what is expected or politically correct.

Last night, Bill Maher was on Jay Leno’s show.  Jay acknowledged Bill for being nominated for 32 Emmys, but never winning.  Jay said (paraphrased):  “Unlike most of us comedians who say that others like and want to hear, you say what others need to hear.  I hope I’m around when you finally get what you deserve.”  Bill is funny without making jokes; he says what is obvious and honest.  We laugh.  He has a job because so few people have the balls to say what is obvious.  Most of us fear humiliation or punishment.

For much of my life, I was surrounded by people who believed that “The truth hurts.”  My inner comedian said that the truth will set you free, but no one believed me.  I put my inner comedian on the shelf in my mid-twenties.  I’d just won the Toastmasters’ East Coast Comedy Competition.  But I couldn’t compete further because my boss wouldn’t let me off work, and my husband didn’t even know I’d competed.  They didn’t find me funny.  I figured that I had a deformed view of comedy.  I’d be better off not using it.  But that felt like part of me died.

Comedy is truthful in Steve Kaplan’s perspective, but it isn’t unkind.  I’d guess that Steve’s Jewish — most people in movies or Hollywood are.  Yet, he starts off his seminar telling a Hitler joke.  Then he says, “Why is a joke funny about a person who was responsible for killing 60,000,000 people?”  Steve didn’t say, “Hitler killed 6,000,000 Jews.”  He said, “Hitler killed 60,000,000 people.”  Steve recognizes as important and worthy 54,000,000 more people than the average Joe.  That’s why he can see into the depths of comedy — below the silly jokes.  The truth on any subject unites people and makes everyone worthy.

 

Beliefs

Given my focus in life, Steve blew me away when he walked up to a student and told him that he’d been looking at his stuff over lunch, and it sucked.  He went to a woman and said that he’d also looked at her writing, and it was amazing.  He was lying to both of them, and he later admitted that.  But the victims’ faces didn’t register lies even after he admitted lying.  The guy looked like he was going to cry; and the woman looked like she might lift off at any moment.

His point was that we believe words even when they’re lies. However, comedy happens when we tell the truth.  Comedy is the natural response for a particular situation and a particular character.  It’s what flies out of our mouth without going through our false-self editing process.

We’ve all lost our funny because we’re all trained to edit everything we say.  We look for what we should say, not what’s natural and true.  We even try to get into other people’s minds, where we don’t belong, so we can say what they expect.

Steve played a clip of a Soap Opera, “All My Children.”  A man and women were talking.  He explained that drama is unnatural.  People say what they need to say to look good, be strong, and be in control.  There’s the life lesson — the cause of drama.  Drama is the effect of people not saying what’s natural.  They say what will make them look good, right, in control, positive, expert, or spiritual.  The false self wants approval or control, not resolution of their problems, true love, or harmonic relationship.  Trying to get those false needs met creates drama, which ironically ends up costing the person the very approval and control they desire.

 

My Desire

Steve’s intensive validated what my True Self knew about comedy.  Initiation works that way.  You unveil the truth within you, and then you find others who validate your true perspective.

I wasn’t there to become Steve or memorize Steve’s words so I could quote them and sound knowledgeable.  I wasn’t there to find myself.  I wanted to be able to remember events of my past that I still held in mind in a dramatic way and allow them to transform into comedy.  When we can laugh at something; it has no power over us anymore.

Seriousness (gravity) is the demise of the True Self; it puts us in the grave.  Lightness (enlightenment) is comedy or seeing the funny in the false self.  The false self (illusion) is just one big lie pretending to be true.  It wants us to believe that the truth hurts, but it doesn’t.  When we laugh at the false self by telling the truth, we expose it and destroy it’s power.  It truly does set us free.

No Longer a Victim: Escaping Victimhood Forever (Part III)

victim, perpetrator, hero in prison

By Cathy Eck

 

This post is a continuation of Part I and Part II.

 

The False Mind Can’t See the True Perpetrator

The master isn’t the slave’s enemy — although it looks that way within the illusion.  Religion and cultural beliefs are our real enemies because those beliefs pull us into the illusion, usually when we’re too young to discriminate.  Once we’re enslaved, there are no exits because the illusion isn’t a place; it’s a perspective.  We can’t exit the illusion with physical action.  Physical actions only change the illusion.  

When were enslaved, we’re trained to focus on action.  If we can’t think of an appropriate action, we see ourselves as victims of situations we believe are beyond control.  But there’s NO victim that can’t go mentally within, see the causal belief, and let it go — if only they knew how.  That’s the action that’s needed.  This information was hidden from the masses.  If it became popular, the illusion would die very quickly;  everyone would be free.

Slavery or bondage of any form is a mental trap that causes the physical trap.  If our mind has been brainwashed to follow false leaders (authority figures), we’ll feel compelled to follow them all.  If we’re taught that life is suffering, we won’t try to escape.  Why bother?  Better the suffering we know than the suffering we don’t.  If we think that our problems are karmic, we’ll accept them blindly.  Fear of God’s judgment is huge.  I found the belief in my false mind that if I obeyed others, I’d look innocent to the judging God.  If I obeyed my True Self, and I was wrong, I wouldn’t have anyone to blame.  WTF?  Blame is another trap.

Belief in cursing (Voodoo) was probably a major belief that enslaved African people.  The Puritan ethic (hard work as virtuous) keeps people stuck in dead end jobs working for billionaires.  Hitler and the Jews both BELIEVED they were chosen.  It’s not that simple of course.  But there’s always a strong common belief between the good and the evil.

 

The Mechanics

When I was in college, about ten big high school football players came into my dorm room one Saturday night when everyone else was out partying.  They shut the door and told me it was time for gang rape.  I stood up, sat their asses on my bed like a school teacher, and proceeded to lecture them.  Looking back, I stepped into the masculine role; and I won the war when I calmly said something like, “You’re gonna make your mamas cry.  Your mamas will be so ashamed of you boys when they put you in jail.”  It worked.  They got up and walked out.  

You see, I took away what they wanted.  They didn’t want sex; they wanted to remove their emotions (their inner feminine) that reminded them of their belief that they were powerless.  We hate our emotions if we fear they’ll never go away.  They would if we used them properly.

Those boys were trying to project their powerlessness on to me.  I didn’t accept their projection.  I gave it right back to them.  Without my acceptance of their projection; they went back to being powerless victims of whoever had victimized them.  I wasn’t the cause of their problem; and I sure as hell wasn’t going to be the effect of it.  And yet, I didn’t understand what really happened at that time.  After years of letting go of beliefs, I again remembered the experience, and it was now obvious why it worked.

 

The Excitement Trap

Perpetrator and victim both tend to follow their emotions, especially excitement, hope, romance.  They imagine false desires that will eliminate their emotions, pain, and suffering.  We label excitement a good emotion, but there’s no such thing.  Emotion always means that what we’re thinking right now is false — it’s not right for us — it’s not true.  It’s probably not even our own thought.   Victim and perpetrator both tend to follow excitement into addictions of sex, drugs, alcohol, gambling, or food.  Often they are drawn to traditions, memorializing, and ceremony to keep their victimhood alive and kicking.

Since I didn’t yet feel responsible for other people’s emotions, the boys couldn’t project that on me.  In time, however, I’d lose my clarity thanks to the New Age movement, a husband who was a people pleaser and took pride in being responsible for making others happy, and a few zingers from my false mind that I didn’t see coming.

Ancient occult teachings said that emotion has attracting power.  That’s correct in the illusion.  Emotions are magnetic.  Sex, drugs, rituals, and even song and dance created an emotional high attracting whatever the occultists wanted, much like charismatic religions today.  But this is improper use of emotion.  The occult message was reborn with psychics, inspired speakers and preachers, and channels of the New Age; people believe these channels just like people believed the prophets in the Old Testament.  It seems that they want to share the truth, but don’t feel anyone will listen to them or fear punishment.  They declare a special purpose or calling.  They do speak mostly the truth, but when we hear the truth from another who’s fearful of being their True Self, it’s worthless knowledge.  Someone who fears being themselves, can’t help us be ourselves.

The illusion is like a battery; it needs recharging.  Old tricks are reused; and we falsely believe that history repeats itself.  In order to confuse us, this occult world was also often labeled initiation.  It produced powerful people who win in the illusion, but aren’t free of it.

True Initiation was a long process of bringing back the initiate’s discrimination by pushing them to let go of any thought that had “good” or “bad” emotional magnetism.  In time, the person had eyes to see and ears to hear.  They healed the curse of religion and were no longer a slave or victim.  They were called free, saved, or born again.

 

 

 

No Longer a Victim: Escaping Victimhood Forever (Part II)

Predators and prey

By Cathy Eck

 

For part I, click here.

 

Getting Unstuck

Unraveling victimhood requires understanding how we got stuck in it in the first place.  The intricacies of the illusion need to be exposed; but until recently, exposing the illusion meant a short life or lots of torture.  I faced those fears every day in the early stages of writing this blog.

The illusion lives on because we can’t see the cause of the problems in our lives.  We’re all victims of magical slight of mind.  We’re told to look outward to people who aren’t the true cause instead of inward to our beliefs because the illusion needs believers.  Remember the word belief contains the word “LIE” within it.

When we fix effects instead of the cause of anything, the problems keeps repeating.  A perpetrator shows up in our life as the effect of our own causal beliefs.  But I know, it doesn’t look that way when we’re in it.  The cause is never outside.  In addition, nothing is incurable; but we must find the causal belief.

Victim, perpetrator, and rescuer are all different forms of masculine and feminine roles playing off of each other.  In truth, there are no roles.  They’re all illusory.  We’re also trained to see the feminine role as powerless.  That training is very difficult to break.  Victim is generally a feminine role; however, some victims are actually perpetrators in disguise.  As people have become smarter, they’ve become better players of the illusion game.

When we’re free of beliefs, no one can trigger us — we remain calm and peaceful all the time.  If I say to you, “You’re an elephant.”  You’ll laugh.  You know you aren’t an elephant.  If I say, “You’re stupid.”  You might believe me.  Your mind will search for times you were stupid.  I’ve triggered your belief that you can be stupid.  If you let that belief go, you’ll not be bothered by my comment.  You’ll laugh because you know it’s false.  This is key; I’m only a perpetrator if you believe what I say.  Otherwise, I’m a comedian.

 

Enlightenment Defined

The difference between tragedy and drama is drama has less beliefs.  The difference between drama and comedy is comedy has less beliefs.  As we let go, we laugh more.  We become lighter; we enlighten.  When we have NO beliefs, we can’t be tricked or triggered by others.  We stay light.

We’re often shocked at the beliefs that arise in our mind as we witness our emotions.  We never consciously accepted most of these beliefs.  We suddenly realize how heavy our thinking is.

I often hear,  “I wasn’t raised in religion; yet I’m finding religious beliefs in my mind. How did they get in there?”  I was shocked by this too.  As I let go, I become aware of the person who gave me the belief.  The mystery does start to unravel.  Letting go causes us to break false-self connections with people who gave us beliefs.   Consequently, people fear they’ll lose someone if they let go of their shared beliefs.  Often they feel strong resistance from the other as they try to let go.  If we keep letting go, we’ll eventually have only a True Self connection with people — just unconditional love.

We got beliefs by being born to people who had them even if they didn’t talk about them.  Kids are telepathic until at least seven years of age.  We’ve sympathized with religious friends and family.  When we believe another’s problem, we also believe the causal belief that they can’t see.  We fear religious people who impose their beliefs on us.  If we fear something, we believe it.  Or we’ve had a teacher of truth or followed inspirational speakers who float above their beliefs.  Remember, if we’re going to someone for the truth, we believe we don’t have it.  So we make a great projection screen for someone who believes they have the truth, when they don’t.

 

Shared Beliefs

We all have perpetrator-victim within us until we let both roles go.  The master and the slave both believe in slavery.  The slave has an inner master and the master an inner slave.  The criminal and policemen both believe in crime.  Neither can play their role without the other.  They’re like conjoined twins.  They’re both victims of the illusion playing false roles.  That’s why criminals often plead temporary insanity.  They don’t know how they got into the role; but once they did, they played the it like they were going for an OSCAR.

Because of the way we hold masculine and feminine roles in mind, it appears that the slave is stuck in the master’s illusion.  We forget that the master needs the slaves or his desire is thwarted.  The policeman needs criminals.  Doctors need patients.

This is difficult to understand because of our perceptual training.  We’re taught to see doctors as good; they’re serving.  (See comic book truth for more.)  If we drop all belief in disease, we don’t need doctors.  They move from rescuer to perpetrator.

Soldier is a completely illusory feminine role (obedience and sacrifice), yet people sign up to kill because it’s reframed as service and heroism.  Our desire to be seen as good or worthy gets us in victim roles.  The trick wouldn’t work if we let go of the beliefs that say we aren’t good or worthy.

We must ask ourselves, “Why do I feel compelled to play this role?”  The answers we get will all be false; they’re our causal beliefs.  Another good question is, “What is the perpetrator thinking about me?”  Again, whatever answers arise are beliefs, let them go.  You can’t let go of the truth, and our mind is 99.99% bullshit.  So always err on the side of letting go.

Once we strengthen our True Self (our true savior) and weaken our own false self (which has both victim, rescuer, and perpetrator), we can no longer be cast into these illusory roles — we can’t be a victim anymore.

To be continued…

 

 

No Longer a Victim: Escaping Victimhood Forever (Part I)

Fish in a Bowl -- victim

By Cathy Eck

 

The hardest thing for people to let go is victimhood.  Victims appear stuck in feminine roles.  Victims always look outward for perpetrators instead of inward to the real cause.  When I convince a victim to let go of the cause within their own mind, their outer perpetrator loses power.  The perpetrator had power because they believed the perpetrator’s beliefs.

 

Reality

We all begin life in a feminine role.  We lack authority and power.  A baby requires someone in a masculine role to care for them.  Consequently, we all associate the feminine role with the powerlessness of childhood.  Our bodies mature, but our minds revert to childhood whenever we’re cast into feminine roles.  We believe we’re powerless — unable to get what we need or want.  We blame the person we think should fulfill our desire, instead of the person who gave us our beliefs.  The illusion survives by making sure victims don’t find or blame the true cause of their victimhood.  In fact, the victim usually  thinks their perpetrator is good or God.

Victims accept false feminine roles in order to look good by flawed standards.   The president declares war on his own enemies and enjoys drinking Dom Perignon while martyrs fight his battles because they believe sacrifice is good.  Billionaires can hire underpaid slaves to do their work because slaves believe hard work is virtuous.  Clergy pass the donation basket and minions drop their last dollar for words that aren’t worth two cents because they believe the Bible is the word of God.  Victims keep illusory machines running; they’re like moths to a flame.  They’re taught that good people sacrifice, work hard, and give when they have nothing to give.  They’re so blindly obedient that they can’t see the flame that’s burning them alive.

 

Win-Lose

I began to question the way life works when I worked for one of the biggest consulting firms in the world in my twenties.  If you’ve seen the movie, “The Wolf of Wall Street,” it’s no exaggeration.  I saw all of that and more.  The wolves see life as a win-lose game; they’re simply good players.  In their mind, if you suck at the game of life, it isn’t their fault.  They view victims as poor losers who give up too easily.  Wolves lie because it works.  They hire cheap labor because people take the jobs. 

During this same time period, I married into a nice Italian Catholic family of sheep.  I lived the life of working and partying all week with the wolves; then I’d visit family and eat communion wafers, hear the same old shit stories over and over again, and watch the same boring rituals and traditions.  They saw life through a lens of good and evil.  They were good and moral.  They saw the wolves I worked for as evil and immoral.   

couldn’t reconcile these two sides of my life.  I didn’t want either.   The wolves partied too much and were never satisfied.   They thought money would buy them freedom and joy, and it never did.  I wanted to be good, but I didn’t want the boredom, misery, and victimhood of sheep.  Clearly, neither had the truth.

 

The Key

Wolves simply do what works in the win-lose illusion.  The wolves respected me because I’d call them on their game — they couldn’t trick me.  Wolves don’t feel immoral anymore than an athlete feels immoral when they win.  They don’t create sheep.  They simply give sheep what they’re asking for — a perpetrator.  

On the other hand, sheep work hard to create more sheep by imposing their beliefs on others, especially children.  They tell others that they’re bad when they’re being their True Self or when they succeed.  They cause people to doubt and ignore their emotions.  They demand blind obedience and won’t answer why questions.  Sheep have power tools — guilt, shame, blame, and fear.  

Sheep told me that I needed to learn to be happy while I suffered.  I couldn’t do that.  Once I got truly happy, the problem causing the suffering vanished.  They were clearly doing something unnatural and making it right, but they said I was a failure at suffering.  WTF?  Their perspective is like Pin the Tail on the Donkey.  They blindfold you, spin you around until you’re dizzy, and then wonder why you can’t find the donkey’s ass.  They eventually break your spirit.  Only then will they say you’re good.  

 

Win-Win

I left the wolves’ den to start my own business, and I found my sweet spot.  If I dealt in win-win terms and worked on my own mind instead of using my will and tricking and manipulating the sheep, I could achieve success without harming others.  I didn’t need to be a wolf.  I shared this with my fellow wolves, and they all joined me.  They were only tricking sheep because they thought they had to.

The positive thinking and new thought movements were attempts by ex-wolves to enlighten sheep.  They revealed the rules of the win-lose game to make things fair.  They put out books like “Think and Grow Rich.”  But giving the sheep the rules of the win-lose game didn’t change anything.  Sheep are stuck in the good and evil game.  They don’t want wolves to go away, they need someone to view as evil.  So many of the wolves said, “Fuck you.  You want wolf.  I’ll show you fucking wolf.”

The wolves had extended the olive branch.  They proved that sheep aren’t victims of wolves in wolves clothing  — we’re born with emotional lie detector systems.  The sheep are victims of wolves in sheep’s clothing — religious and spiritual wolves masked as sheep (masculine roles behaving as if they’re feminine) who teach sheep to turn off their emotional lie detection, blindly obey authority, and ignore their True Self.   Without this psychological reversal, wolves would be powerless.   Sadly, sheep follow shepherds who feed them to the wolves, and the sheep glorify the shepherds for doing it.  .

To be continued…

 

Manifesting Desires: An Alternative To New Year Goals and Resolutions

New Year's Resolutions

By Cathy Eck

 

It’s that time of year when people talk about their desires, resolutions, goals, and intentions for the next year.  Most of those goals will be abandoned before the leftovers from New Year’s Day dinner are gone. People tend to do what they’ve done before — even if it didn’t work.  They don’t know what else to do.  Their beliefs limit their mind so they can’t see what lies outside of their little box.

 

Desires

The process of manifesting desires is very different from the initiate’s perspective.  Initiates consider all desires to be worthwhile. Their goal is never the fulfillment of those desires, although that often happens, because our True Self can fulfill all desires with ease.  The initiate knows that desires create a catalyst for letting go.  Having desires exposes the beliefs that we need to let go by bringing them into our conscious awareness.   As we shed those beliefs, we either get our desires or we forget about them.  But either way, desires served our quest for freedom.

Most people use mental (affirmations, visualization, etc.) or physical actions to achieve desires.  Beliefs rise to the surface, and people obey them even if they don’t want to.  If they don’t obey their beliefs, they don’t fulfill their desires.  We admire people who can beat their beliefs into submission with willpower and hard work or leap over their beliefs with a single bound — usually they’re also good at projecting their unwanted beliefs on to others.  Getting desires is considered success; not getting them is failure.  The journey isn’t very pleasant.

As the New Year approaches, we view life as if we’re starting over.  We’re often more aware of our desires.  But the beliefs we had last year that caused us to fail are still there unless we’ve been letting go.  The initiate focuses on finding the beliefs in their mind that keep their desires from manifesting.  They don’t jump into action or use their will to fulfill desires.  They take action only if it’s inspired, joyous, and fun.  Otherwise, they keep letting go.

 

Beliefs

We find our beliefs by watching our mind as we lightly think about our desires; or we ask questions to expose beliefs.  Of course, when the answers (beliefs) arise, we must discriminate.  Often the answers we hear in our mind are widely believed, socially correct, or traditional.  They might sound like guidance or God talking.  They’re going to look true and real because we believed them before.  If our desires are long standing, we’re probably highly psychological reversed (meaning that we accept beliefs that feel bad as true).

Let’s look at a common example — dropping weight.  We have a desire to change our body weight.  We can even see ourselves at the perfect weight.  That’s all we have to do with our desire.  It’s recorded.

Now we have to find the beliefs that keep the weight from just falling off effortlessly doing activities or eating food we enjoy.  Let’s assume that the first belief to arise is, “I have to join a gym and work out.”  Let’s assume that thought arises with lots of emotion.  We don’t like working out.  The emotion is saying, “That thought isn’t the truth.”  A battle with our mind has begun.  We live in a reality where lots of people lose weight by working out for long hours.  There are zillions of programs and trainers.  Dr. Oz will tell you that you need to do this.  But none of that matters.  We’re looking for our truth. If a thought is accompanied by emotion, it’s not true for us.

Our false mind will try to force us to accept the widely-accepted status quo.  When we follow another person’s beliefs on any subject, we’re believing that we don’t have the answer to fulfilling our desires.   We need to let that belief go; it isn’t true.  But we usually don’t.  Instead, we accept more beliefs that we’re told are the right beliefs.  Eventually, we’ll get tired of this solution, usually after paying lots of money to borrow the expert’s beliefs.  We’ll see the stupidity of it.  In addition, their solution will lack staying power.  Their enthusiasm might be real; their solution might have been the right solution for them.  But that doesn’t mean it’s right for us.  What’s right for us will feel good.  We won’t have to will ourselves to do it.

People look outside to others for answers.  But the only answer that works permanently is the answer that lives in our True Self.  We find that by letting go of the beliefs that veil it.

So the gym thought feels horrible, and we let it go.  Now we think, “I have to find a diet.”  The normal person will go buying books, making diet food, and enrolling in programs.  But we’re an initiate; we notice the diet thought generates emotions.  So we let the thought and emotions go.

If we keep following our chain of beliefs, we’ll start to find the hidden causes.  We’ll find more and more beliefs about food, exercise, and body that have supported our weight.  We might find relationship beliefs or beliefs about career.  If weight has been an issue for much of our life, this won’t be a weekend job.  It’s a new way of life.  We’ll find more  beliefs arise every time we eat.  We’ll find beliefs arise if we sit down and do nothing.  We’ll find beliefs when we visit family and friends.  But now we’re on the right path.  We’ve become aware of the complex system of beliefs that exists within our mind.  And we’ll keep letting go for days, months, or years until we’re free.  Our desires have served their purpose.   Then one day, we’ll forget our desires ever existed because they’re manifesting.  We don’t need desires when we easily get everything we want and need.  And all that struggle in the past will be nothing but a waking dream that really was just an illusion.

 

Slavery and Freeing Our Minds

Statue in Cuenca, Ecuador

By Cathy Eck

 

Traveling in the Feminine Role

I’m back home reflecting on my nearly three months in Ecuador.  When most people travel, they either go as tourists, which means they see the sites and stay in places that are sanitized from reality; or, they go in a service, ministry, or business capacity.  Tourist and service are both masculine roles.  In masculine roles, we have choices and power (even influence) over others and our situation.  In traditional feminine roles, we have little or no influence.  We must observe and let go of whatever comes at us.  Traveling in the feminine role is useful for freeing the darkest parts of our mind — especially our inner slavery.  It’s an inner, rather than outer, adventure.

In a country like Ecuador, everyone shares the same point of view.  They practice the same religion, and their culture has been molded into one common perspective.  They have no reason to question their perspective.  You’re either an insider or an outsider.

I accepted my feminine role as an outsider.  No one there even knew what I did.  I wasn’t trying to change minds; I was simply trying to free my own mind.   We tend to blindly accept beliefs when we’re in the feminine role because of our training as young children.  By willingly taking on a feminine role, we can see, discriminate, and let go of the automatic mental programs that accepted the beliefs of others without discriminating first.

 

Slavery

When I got home, this quote by Ezra Pound was on my Facebook wall.  “A slave is one who waits for someone to come and free him.”  Powerful quote!  

Physically everyone in Ecuador was free; yet mentally, no one was free.  We can’t see mental chains; most people train themselves to no longer feel them.  They don’t notice the smallness of their prison cell because others have the same cell.   They label their chains a fact of life — the truth.  

When acceptance lacks the desire for change, it’s not acceptance; it’s apathy.  Apathy keeps us stuck in slavery; apathy places hope in a savior.  

I grew up in a town with conformity of beliefs, much like Ecuador.  It was filled with apathy masking as acceptance.  Things usually came easier to me because my desires didn’t have to travel through a huge labyrinth of beliefs.  Then I married one of the insiders; over time, his cultural and religious beliefs infected my mind.  Everything became more difficult for me as his beliefs took root in my mind.  I kept weeding — attempting to remove his beliefs.  I just couldn’t find the causal root.  There was something in my mind that caused me to blindly believe him over and over again.  I looked everywhere for someone that could erase his beliefs — kissed a lot of frogs that weren’t princes during that time in my life.  I was stuck in slavery, looking for someone to rescue me.  No one did because they were slaves too.  Their techniques could provide relief from the effects; but they couldn’t eliminate the beliefs — the cause.

When I discovered letting go of beliefs, I was overjoyed.  I could now free my husband from his mental slavery too.  But he was looking for a physical savior.  My truth sounded crazy; he thought his beliefs were the truth.  “What, my problems aren’t real?  You think I created my problems?  You think my beliefs aren’t true?” he said again and again.  Over time, problems tend to have payoffs.  People bond around problems.  To expose their illusion feels unloving.  His family believed they were given a burden by God to carry together; and I was unwilling to share that burden so I was bad and unloving.

I hated their judgment of me.  I wasn’t bad or unloving; I was trying to free them.  I constantly tried to defend myself.  But proving their beliefs wrong meant holding on to their beliefs.  My freedom required letting go of their beliefs, not proving them wrong.  Right-wrong, win-lose, good-evil all keep us stuck in mental slavery.  Only by realizing that a belief is powerless and false, and letting it go, do we achieve real freedom.  We don’t have to correct beliefs; we only have to stop fueling them.  Let them go.  Without fuel, they die a natural death.

Ecuador tested me to stay free of beliefs that were very familiar.  Even with beliefs as thick as mud, I usually managed to let go.  Whenever I fell for a belief, I could feel my emotions closing in on me; I’d immediately go to work on my own mind.  I didn’t try to defend myself.  I didn’t try to prove them wrong.  I simply  took responsibility for my error and dug myself back out of the mental quicksand.  This time, I didn’t become a slave in their illusion.  I passed my own initiation test.

I observed the causal patterns within my mind that caused me to believe others in the past.  In almost every case, I didn’t want to be judged, I tried to defend myself, or I didn’t want to follow their rules.  In order to prove them wrong, I needed to accept their belief as real.  Now I was at war — the inner battle of good and evil that never ends.  The more I tried to fight their belief in my mind, the more real it became.  I was keeping myself enslaved in their world.  Only I could free myself.

Freedom is about knowing your OWN mind so well that others can’t tarnish it.  Freedom is about discriminating with such mastery that no one can trap us in their illusion.  Freedom is being our True Self anywhere and anytime.  Escaping the illusion requires thinking from true and false and micromanaging our own mind while allowing others to think whatever they want.  The other’s perspective was real for me only because I believed them.  They didn’t enslave me: I enslaved myself.  Therefore, I could also FREE myself and so can everyone else.

 

The False Self as a Container and Level Confusion

beliefs separate

By Cathy Eck

 

We Are One

One of the most dangerous beliefs to come out of the New Age Movement is, “We are One.”  It’s hard to understand why this statement is dangerous because it’s true.  However, it’s only true at the True Self level.  When we put True Self thinking on top of false self beliefs, we create serious level confusion.  Our false self usually projects an opponent that we abhor, and we can’t escape them because our false mind thinks we’re one with them.

The last thing we want is oneness with other false selves.  If our false self believes in oneness, it will also become one with other people’s confusion, pain, or suffering; or it will take responsibility for things that we didn’t create.

Once we understand that our false selves weren’t designed to be one with other false selves, the process of letting go gets much easier and faster.  The false self is like a creative container.  In order to create anything, we do need some beliefs.  We hold the beliefs we need in our false self container while we create or co-create; then when we’re done with that creative act, we erase the container and start over.  This was called remaining a mental virgin in the ancient world.

Beliefs were never meant to be permanent.  The True Self holds that which is permanent or immortal; it can’t be erased.  Therefore, letting go of the belief in oneness is totally safe; and it can be life changing.

 

Mind As Computer

The computer is a near perfect analogy for our minds.  When we buy a computer, it comes with an operating system.  Everyone gets an  operating system.  You could say that computers are the same at birth.  But the operating system doesn’t do much; it only provides creative potential.  Likewise, our True Self is our mind’s operating system.  It provides the potential, but we need beliefs or programs to create.

Once we take over creative responsibility for our computer, we load programs, many of which we share with other users.  These popular programs could be likened to cultural or religious beliefs.  If we enjoy a particular program, we’ll want to study it or talk about it with others.  We might take classes in that program or join a user’s group.  We might not want to ever delete that program, but we can.  And, most important, we don’t have the right to sneak into another person’s office and install our program on their computer.  We must honor the privacy of  others and leave their hard drive alone.  Our passion is meant to fuel our own creativity — not to become an evangelist for our programs.

After loading programs, we add data, sound, and images that are uniquely our own.  In a short period of time, we won’t find another computer exactly like ours in all the world.  We can’t let go of the operating system or True Self because that would destroy our creative capacity.  But we have complete control over our hard drive (our false self).  We can add or delete programs and data as necessary depending on what we want to create and who we want to co-create with.

 

Back to The Mind

The data or programs we load into our false mind create uniqueness.  If we chose our programs carefully for creative purposes, we’ll love the focus and potential that our false mind provides.  We won’t feel separate from others because our True Self has oneness handled.  In addition, we’ll easily erase the beliefs when our creative focus changes.

But if we didn’t choose our programs, we’ll lack creative uniqueness.  We’ll only be able to copy others.  We’ll find it difficult or impossible to erase our hard drive.   We’ll fear that erasing the shared programs or data will produce loneliness (when the exact opposite is true).  Our perfect creative tool has now become a high security prison where the prisoners make sure that no one escapes.

If we’ve had controlling people in our life who thought they owned our hard drive, we’ll fear the programs (beliefs) of others.  We’ll fear that everyone wants to take over our hard drive.  When we fear that another can do such a thing, they do.  This is a huge problem in the world today.  Everyone is afraid of everyone else’s beliefs.  They keep trying to strengthen their firewall (boundaries) with more beliefs and programs.  They don’t realize that in order to fear another’s belief system, they have to hold it in mind.  If we let their beliefs go from our mind, we lose our fear of them.  Our immortal True Self provides far better protection than even the best program.

 

False Self Example

If my friend and I share a belief in hard work, and I delete my belief, her mental container remains unaffected.  I can’t delete beliefs from her mind.  But now I’m leading an easy life while she’s still working herself to death.  She could let go of her belief and join me, but she’s proud of her hard work ethic.  She gets approval for her martyrdom.  From her veiled perspective, I might look lazy or like I’m cheating at life.  I’m now her enemy.

The false self bonds or creates the illusion of oneness using beliefs.  It looks for like-minded people for comfort and security.  It wants other prisoners around it to validate its false rightness.  It feels lonely without like-minded support.

After letting go, we’re often tempted to turn back because those we care about believe we’ve abandoned, rejected or hurt them.  But we must keep letting go until we clear our mind completely and rediscover the place where WE REALLY ARE ALL ONE  — the place of no borders.  We didn’t abandon or reject them; they’re creating their own painful separation by holding on.  Once our own mind is free and our judgment gone, we can hold out our hand.  And often they reach up, grab on, and let go.  Now, WE ARE ONE.

 

Honesty, Reality, and the True Self

Honesty and looking in the mirror

By Cathy Eck

 

Honesty Used Ineffectively

One of the biggest problems that arises in people who want to be themselves and free their mind is they’re usually really honest people.  Often their honesty gets them in trouble when trying to let go.  This was a mind trick that nailed my ass to the wall for a long time.

Let’s say you want to lose weight.  When you look in the mirror, you see reality.  You don’t like what you see, and your false mind honestly comments on what it sees.  Positive thinkers would say to look in the mirror and say, “I’m a skinny person,” 5000 times.  But you’re an honest person; that just doesn’t work for you.  It feels like lying.  In fact, it just makes things worse.  Since you can’t lie, and your reality is in your face, you feel hopelessly screwed by your own honesty.

The problem is that your beliefs have already created too much weight.  So how do you get behind the reality to let go of the beliefs?  What you must realize is that the beliefs you currently hold in mind in this very moment are the beliefs that got you to this point.  The good news is that as you look in the mirror, you’re probably feeling emotion.  That means that the beliefs are close to the surface of your mind.  The emotion will take you to the causal belief if you follow it.

The key is to change your mental focus from what you see to what you are thinking and feeling.  In that way, you can find the cause and let it go.

Our goal is to let go of any belief about weight that isn’t true.  If we can let go of all of the beliefs that we have about food, exercise, genetics, body type, or weight in general, then we won’t be able to create too much weight anymore.

Now I realize that I’ve picked a loaded topic.  Most of us can let go of food and exercise beliefs for a long time without running out of them.  We’ve accepted a hell of a lot of them; and if we’re honest, they all feel bad.  They can also be tricky to let go because we got most of them from experts.  But if we want freedom, we have to strip the power from the experts.  Our True Self is much wiser.

 

The Process

As we look in the mirror and see too much weight, we can feel the emotion arising.  Our honesty is dying to express itself.  If we’ve hung out in the new thought movement, we’ll want to put whipped cream on our honesty.  But don’t do it.  Whatever our mind is saying is just a belief; we don’t have to hide it or fear it because we can let it go.  This is really facing our fears.  Instead of decorating them, stuffing ourselves with some cake, turning on the television, or whining to a friend, we feel the emotion, witness the causal thoughts as they arise, and let them all go.

Let’s say that when you looked in the mirror you said, “I’m so fat.”  That comment clearly doesn’t feel good.  But you say, “That isn’t a belief.  It’s true.  I am fat.”  And therein lies the problem. Focusing on reality or labeling it solidifies the belief even more.  It makes it even harder to create change.

 

Honesty is Your Ally

Most people say, “You must deny what you see.  Cancel, cancel.”  That’s just fixing the illusion, and the illusion will come back later on.  We must remove the illusion to eliminate the problem completely.

We succeed if we turn our honesty on our mind.  This is what allows the situation to change.  Our biggest mental downfall, that perpetuates all problems, is that we’re all far too focused on reality.  We talk about reality; we warn people about reality.  But reality is caused by our beliefs.  Reality isn’t the truth.  Remember reality is our True Self, plus our beliefs.

We must stop commenting on what we SEE in the mirror; instead, we turn our ally of honesty on our mind.  Our mind says, “You look terrible.”  That comment clearly doesn’t feel good; so it isn’t true (meaning it isn’t who we really are).  Go into mind clean up mode.  Stay focused on the job at hand.  Our mind can continue to comment all it wants; but as it comments, we let go of every thought that doesn’t feel good.  In this way, we’ve begun the process of clearing our mind of all the beliefs that caused the excess weight.

As the beliefs go, we might spontaneously choose different food, find ourself taking up a sport, or just losing the weight without any action at all.  Our True Self will inspire us if any action is necessary for us.

 

The Goal of Life

The goal of life is not to prove reality right.  Anyone can do that.  The goal of life is to return to our True Self.  To do that, we must let reality know that we know it’s false.

This is the hardest switch for people to make in freeing their minds.  Almost no one does it.  It’s especially difficult when it comes to our body, our finances, or world events.  It drives us insane in relationships where we let go, and the other person keeps reminding us of reality.  But that’s why initiation isn’t for wimps.

Our false self thinks that we have to fix reality.  But reality is an illusion.  It makes no sense to fix a false illusion.  Eventually, one incredibly wonderful day, we no longer hold any beliefs in our mind.  Then reality and the truth are the same thing.

So be honest about what you are thinking, not what you see.  Be hard core in forcing your mind to drop whatever thoughts contain emotion.  Then you can turn anything around.

photo credit: jesuscm [2 weeks off] via photopin cc

Becoming a True Leader by Mastering the Masculine Role

Masculine Role

By Cathy Eck

 

Masculine Role

A true leader is someone who carries out the masculine role perfectly.  The masculine role in our modern world has fallen to a very low level.  Most leaders in masculine roles are power-hungry, competitive, and need to be right.  They project their shadows on to others; then they blame the shadow.  Consequently, the people they lead in feminine roles feel confused, emotional, and powerless.

The master of the masculine role leads from the inside out.  They have a pure mind and only believe thoughts that take them to a win-win vision (they actually know what a win-win vision is).  They let go of the thoughts that aren’t moving their community or business forward.  They don’t hide their false self under a nice or smart persona or say one thing and do another.  They have few beliefs; all of them are from first-cause (non-judgmental) thinking.

Years ago, I discovered the true masculine as a business owner.  At first, I followed other leaders.  I tried to motivate my employees, create an inspiring vision, and treat everyone fairly.  I tried to hide or deny my fear.  But something was off, and I knew it because I could feel it in my body.  I still competed for work.  I still honored beliefs about business and my industry because everyone else did.

In short, my masculine mind was split into win and lose.  I was always battling for the win.  When I won, I felt good.  When I lost, I felt bad.  The outcome of any competition determined how I felt, and that was no longer acceptable.  So I made a simple decision that I would no longer do anything that wasn’t win-win for everyone involved.

Slowly, I realized that if I let go of my own beliefs, I was left with the truth around any situation.  My employees no longer needed motivating, and I didn’t have to compete and market.  I got the business that was right for me.

I wasn’t just changing my thoughts superficially; I let go of the thoughts that weren’t true.  My mind now sorted information based on true and false, not win and lose.  When something went wrong, I found the cause in my mind and let it go.  The cause was always a belief that I’d learned from another.  Slowly the outer world came to match my inner vision.

But this all worked because I played the masculine role.  I was in charge.  I used the people in the feminine role as my mirror; I was serious about not breaking that mirror.

 

Why Leaders Fail?

Leaders fail because they aren’t leading.  They might hold the position, title, or authority; but they aren’t a true leader if they lead from win-lose.  They hold beliefs or rules in mind that they want others to follow.  They see enemies to defeat.

Most leaders try to impose or force their beliefs on others.  They try to convince everyone that their beliefs are right and their enemies are real.

When a leader simply wants to win their projected battles, they aren’t a leader.  They’re a dictator.  Dictators tend to use force, shame, guilt, blame, manipulation, or fear to get their way.   Sadly, most parents, teachers, clergy, and leaders of all sorts are either dictators or complete push-overs.  A true leader is neither of these.

 

Getting to True

To get to true leadership, we must find the cause of problems in our own mind.  The cause is always thought, a belief.  The person playing the masculine role is always at cause in the illusion because it’s the masculine role that has authority, makes rules, and gives rewards or punishment. The illusion was created that way.

What we really want are leaders without beliefs that take us all to peace, abundance, and freedom.  But our false self tends to choose leaders that validate our beliefs.  We feel supported when people think like us.  So we exacerbate the problem.

 

Letting Go in the Masculine Role

Letting go in the masculine role is different from the feminine.  In the feminine role, it feels like beliefs are coming at us.  We didn’t make the rules or create the beliefs, but we feel we must follow them.  Letting go in the feminine role is difficult.

In the masculine role, we’re always facing our own projection.  If our projection isn’t free, joyous, and basking in abundance, our false self wants to either fix or battle its shadow, when it should just let it go.  Some people do this their entire life.  Shit we label people heroes for fixing their own faulty projections.  We’re really blind on this issue.

If a leader of a country sees poverty, they have poverty inside their mind.  If they see terrorists, they’re the cause of the terrorism.  When we accept the masculine role, we accept the responsibility for everything that goes wrong.

The person in the masculine role cannot be a victim because they’re the cause.  Problems can only be fixed at the cause.  When the leader takes responsibility for their thinking, problems get fixed easily.  When they take action to fix the effects of their thinking, problems last forever.

Our world is a mess now because our leaders project their beliefs outside of them and act innocent when they come back to bite their ass.  This is why I teach people in feminine roles to no longer accept projections or beliefs.  Leaders stop blaming the feminine when it no longer works.

The true masculine recognizes that their job is to watch and listen to their feminine projection and self correct.  A true leader rarely gets the credit because they made the correction inside their mind, rather than outside with effort.  It looks like things just went back to normal or a miracle occurred.

Lao Tzu said, “A leader is best when people barely know he exists, when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: we did it ourselves.”  Lao Tzu understood true leadership.

Escaping the Feminine Role

Feminine role

By Cathy Eck

 

The Feminine Role

In the illusion, the masculine role is the authority or assertive role.  Consequently, the masculine role is easy to drop.  But no one wants to play the powerless, feminine role, so people hold on to masculine roles.  When we need to be in control, we fear the feminine role.  If we’re addicted to victimhood, we’re stuck and apathetic in the feminine role.

Life in the illusion has a way of pulling us into the feminine.  Eventually, we retire from our expert or authority job.  Our body gives out; we can no longer be the sports star.  Our kids grow up.  It looks like we’ve lost our mojo; it feels terrible unless we understand what’s occurring.  Our feminine self needs healing.

 

Feeling Powerless

Traditionally, the feminine role was the child, wife, slave, employee, or prisoner.  These roles had no power in the illusion; good meant obedient.  Then came a new kind of feminine role that appeared to be masculine but wasn’t.  The soldier believes he has power over the enemy; but he’s just following orders.  Conspiracy theorists notice when leaders in power aren’t being rational; they seem to be following orders of a hidden authority.  If we’re obeying another person, we’re in a feminine role.

If you saw the movie “Jobs” about Steve Jobs, you saw him change when Apple became a public company.  He became feminine to his board of directors.  He had to obey orders even if it wasn’t good for the company.   There’s nothing more horrific then submitting to a false leader.  Yet, we do it all the time; we continue to perpetuate blind obedience and respect for authority because we think it’s true and an unavoidable part of life.

One would think that leaders would be more conscious of this.  After all, we all start out in the feminine role as children.  We all feel the sting of having to take orders from another who doesn’t lead from unconditional love.  Sadly, when people get into the masculine role, they seem to think they’re always right.  They follow the unspoken Golden Role, which is “I do to others what was done to me.”

 

The Escape

We know we’re in a feminine role when we feel stuck in someone’s illusion.  It can be as serious as being in a prison camp or as insignificant as listening to our friend whine.  Either way, we feel stuck in a feminine role and can’t escape.

We must first recognize that our own beliefs got us in the role.  Usually we feel the need to be obedient or nice.

When we let go of the beliefs that caused us to assume the feminine role, we begin to match our True Self’s perspective.  Letting go of the false is what gets us to true.  This appears to be impossible because we’ve submitted to the other person; and both of us believe that they’re in the masculine power role.  But it is very possible.

We also submit willingly to false selves.  We hire a trainer to get fit.  The trainer is only giving us knowledge — their version of the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil.  If we believe them, their beliefs will override our old beliefs about fitness.  Seekers are looking for a better spiritual belief system.  In sickness, we look for someone who believes in a cure.   In the illusion, we spend our life trying to trade up beliefs causing us to form codependent relationships around beliefs.  Letting go breaks these false ties to experts and authority figures.  Our own True Self has the wisdom of life we seek; it has no problems to fix.

 

Stuck in the Feminine Role 

The key to escaping a feminine role is to witness our emotions and discriminate continuously.  Wallowing in our emotions keeps us stuck.  We must let go of any belief that enters our mind or arises that has an emotional component.  Here’s an example of what I teach people to do who feel stuck in the feminine by racism.

Racist:  You’re lazy and good for nothing.

Feminine:  Doesn’t speak.  They go inward and feel the emotion inside of their body as they receive the words of the racist.  They recognize that their own emotional navigator is saying, “Don’t believe them; what they say isn’t true.”  So they let go of the words they hear because they aren’t true.  Now those words don’t take hold in their body-mind.  In fact, the emotional energy goes back to the racist.

Racists or bulles don’t fall over easy.  It’s likely that they’ll receive their emotion back and try again.  After all, they’re psychologically reversed.  They think their false belief is true because it has emotion.  Psychologically reversed leaders create very confused followers.  So you have to stay in true and false discrimination until they go away.  They will.  True trumps authority; it pulls us outside of the illusion where false authorities can’t harm us.

The goal of most people in a masculine role is to eliminate their own emotions by projecting them on another.  They don’t realize their emotions are related to their own stinking thinking.  When people say that a role (like healer, preacher, performer, or teacher) is life giving, they’re usually projecting their beliefs on those in the feminine role, which gives their beliefs (false self) more power.  A role or purpose is not life giving.  Being our True Selves is life giving.  True roles are for cocreation only.

Finally, we must look at our own beliefs to see what caused us to accept a false feminine role.  Most beliefs came from ancestors.  We’re taught to believe we must obey authority or respect elders.  We’re taught that what happens to others can happen to us.  We’re taught that if our beliefs generate emotion, they’re true.  We stop discriminating.  We believe what we’re told.  Eventually, if we let all those beliefs go, no one can put us in an illusory feminine role again.  We’re one step closer to freedom.

 

Projection and the Shadow

shadow

By Cathy Eck

 

Projection and the Shadow

People have become far too psychologically savvy.  That isn’t good because most people are very outer directed.  Instead of using psychological knowledge to fix themselves, they try to fix others.  Everyone’s giving advice — mostly bad advice that gets us stuck in the illusion.  Initiation was very different from modern psychology.  The high initiates, who had already purified their mind, mentored the lower initiates.

To understand projection, we must understand the idea of the personal shadow.  “Everyone carries a shadow,” Carl Jung wrote, ” and the less it is embodied in the individual’s conscious life, the blacker and denser it is.”  Most people in power identify with good or right and project bad or wrong on to others.  Their blindness to their own faults is often misconstrued as self-confidence.Only an authority or masculine role can project; those in the feminine role receive. Thus children don’t project on parents or teachers.  Citizens don’t project on leaders. Employees don’t project on bosses.

What we call the collective mindset is determined by the elite.  Whatever beliefs they hold as true (and don’t identify with) will be projected out on to the world.  People see this as a conspiracy; but it’s just how projection works.  Most of them think their beliefs are right, good, and true.  They think they’re doing a great service, and the rest of the world is just inferior, stupid, or bad.

Jung also said that some people have a good shadow; they identify with the less desirable half of their personality and project their good qualities.  Often they think they’re being humble.  Some of the people I mentor have done this because they didn’t want to be like the assholes that played a masculine role in their early life.

In the illusion, we train people to be feminine from birth.  Our school and religious systems have one authority with lots of receivers of knowledge.  In most cases, questioning that authority was frowned upon. Our minds and bodies were conditioned to take in information without exercising discrimination if it comes from an expert (one who has knowledge).

When I started to understand discrimination, I struggled with the fact that my mind knew something was false, but my body received the information as if it were true.  I wasn’t my own body’s authority.  I was horrified.  We should all be the only authority of our body; it’s OUR body.  But I had accepted the projections of many seeming body experts.

Projection Defined

Jung defined projection:  “shadow, in being instinctive and irrational, is prone to projection: turning a personal inferiority into a perceived moral deficiency in someone else.”  In others words, what we see in others is actually in our own mind.

Initiation differs from Jung.  Most shadow work talks about embracing the shadow.  The initiates said to get rid of the whole false self — good and bad aspects.  That way, you’re left with just the True Self.  You can’t just let go of what you don’t like; you have to let go of the opposite that you do like to get to freedom.  People don’t like to do that.  For example, you have to let go of your own Tony Robbins style hyper-motivation before you’ll stop seeing lazy people everywhere.  You have to let go of your half-full persona before the half empties stop raining on your parade.

Projection defines the world we see.  The greater our power and the more we judge, the more we project.  If an authority sees their projection in another and convinces them that what they see is true, they can cause that person to be stuck in their illusion.  They’ll have power over that person whenever they push the button they installed.  We’ve all known people who can push our buttons.  They’ve simply installed a powerful psychological reversal button.

We can escape their illusion if we recognize that when the projector says “we’re lazy,” we feel emotion.  The emotion means their statement isn’t true.  Bigots and racists always see their own projection.  If we let their words go because they are untrue, the emotion usually reverts back to the projector.  The projector generated the emotion, in the first place, by thinking something false; so they deserve to have the emotion back.  Lying in their own sewage might force them to let go or to at least question their projection.  But don’t be fooled, they won’t go down easy.  Usually when they feel the emotion return to them, they’ll say you projected on them.  Often they will try to send the emotion back to you another way.  Ultimately we stop taking projections when we let go of beliefs.

Projection and the Masculine Role

The person projecting is always in the masculine role; they hold beliefs or a belief system that they believe to be true, and they usually blame the effect of their belief system on the feminine.  They don’t take responsibility for what they see in the world.  When we’re with such people, they often speak to us as if they’re talking to themselves; they are.

We don’t project from the feminine role; the feminine role has no power in the illusion.  But we become the target for the projection of the same sort of authorities.  They’re like heat-seeking missiles.

We won’t discriminate when projections come our way if we’re filled with beliefs.  We’ll accept their projection and then resent or hate it even if we know it’s wrong or bad.  We’ll waste our time trying to defend it, which only makes it stronger.

Projection only exists in the illusion.  The True Self has no beliefs that give power to experts or authority.  We see them as keepers of knowledge; and we aren’t interested in knowledge when we have our own wisdom.  Thus, as we let go, we move out of the illusion where everyone minds their own business and lives their own life.

 

Human Dream, American Dream, or Elitism?

Elitism or American Dream

By Cathy Eck

 

American Dream

Recently, people were asked, “What is the American Dream? Was their still an American Dream?”

Most people said that if you work hard, you get rewarded.  Others said that it was about having a job — any job.  Some said it was not being homeless.  The answers to the question had a pretty low threshold.  As a child, I was taught to believe that America was the land of opportunity, where dreams could come true.  But the notion that America is the land of dreams doesn’t make sense.

We’re told to think that we need outer freedom in order to have inner freedom.  That’s backwards;  inner freedom produces outer freedom.

The American Dream (or the human dream) needs serious redefining. The entire dream mentality is covered with win-lose mental vomit.  Those who have succeeded in fulfilling their dreams in the past came to hold an elitist mentality.  They felt that their accomplishment took them out of the illusion.  They got an exemption from reaping the shit that their own beliefs had sown.  They convinced us that they could pass that exemption on to their children.  And they became quite accomplished at projecting their beliefs on to others since their power caused people to believe any old thing they said.

Thus wealth, fame, or royalty carried with it an unspoken exemption from the ordinary problems of life.  It buys false power, but it doesn’t buy true freedom, peace, or joy.  The only love they get is false love and blind worship.  Lady Di did us the favor of exposing the illusion that marrying a prince is happily ever after.  Sorry Cinderella — the physical prince isn’t the answer.

 

False Freedom

Within the illusion, everyone feels powerless; what we think we want is to be heard and to have our rules followed even if they are selfish and harm others.  We want our religion to be the one.  We want our country to be the biggest and best.  We want everyone to say, “You are the ONE.”

But that’s not freedom.  Even the most powerful in the illusion are always aware that they could fall like Humpty Dumpty at any moment.  Elitism only has the power that others give it.  Strip away those worshippers, fans, and faithful followers; and they lose it all in the blink of an eye.

That’s why it often looks like there’s an elite conspiracy.  The winners want to keep their beliefs in power because that’s all the power they have.  They fear exposure more than anything else in the world.  Exposure is death to the false self.  We’re their worst enemy when we see clearly that the emperor has no clothes.

Real freedom happens when you let go of the illusion.  As you stop feeding it, it loses power.  At first it loses power over you; but then you help others; and it loses power over them.  Eventually, it loses power over lots of people; and then what happens?

Look at who loses if the guy sitting on top of the elite’s power pyramid loses the very illusion that holds him or her up.  They fall on thine ass.  Their lack of real power is exposed.  The elite have all the beliefs that you and I have.  They just top their manure with Haagen-Dazs.  As long as we give their “Your Special” beliefs power, they win.  When we stop, they lose everything that made them special.  And it might be the best thing that ever happened to them.

The reason we often resist giving up our beliefs that “they’re special” is because we’ve not yet let go of the hope that we might one day be special.  We must realize that we don’t want elite specialness because it has no true value.  Then it’s easy to let go.

 

Level Confusion

When one is an elitist, they view themselves above the trash heap of the world.  As we let go, something different happens.

Our level confusion comes undone.  At first, the illusion seems oppressive and huge.  But if we keep realizing it isn’t true, we see through the illusion.  We aren’t impressed by or afraid of false selves in power.   Our mind sees causes; and we heal the causes, not the effects.  We come into contact with those we can help, and we don’t come into contact with those we can’t help.  Life does the sorting, not our mind.

The elite no longer look powerful, strong, or brave; they look lost and powerless.  Men that used to look big and scary, look small and weak.  You can see who they’ve chosen to be.  It’s sad because you know they’re not that stupid mask, and you want to rip it off and love them.  But often, they’re afraid of losing their mask — it’s all they’ve got; and you look like an enemy if you expose them.  But if you don’t expose them, they’ll never get real freedom, joy, or love.

They aren’t evil at the core; they just don’t feel the emotions that their own thoughts are creating until you stop accepting them.  When you stand in your True Self, their false self is defeated.  They become (holy shit — I’m going to use the N word)  NORMAL.

We start by letting go of our beliefs (the ones they convinced us were true), and we become our True Selves — the place where we’re all equal and valuable.  When there is enough real people in the world, the pyramid of power will cave in and life will be fair again, borders will fall, and love will reign.

As people let go of the illusion, they get creative.  They aren’t trying to solve problems; they’re innovating something new.  They gather others of like mind or talent, and they make dreams come true.  That’s the human dream — to express our gifts and talents, to share them with the world, and to contribute in a way that’s win-win for everyone.  And that can happen anywhere — not just in America.

 

The Agony of Psychological Reversal

Psychological reversal

By Cathy Eck

 

Understanding psychological reversal is key to freeing our mind.  We’re all psychologically reversed in the areas of our life that don’t work perfectly.

 

What’s Psychological Reversal?

Years ago, I took a muscle testing class.  There was one woman in the class that creeped me out.  Lucky me; the instructor paired me with this creepy woman.  I was going to discover why she felt creepy.

When I asked her to think of a happy time, her arm went limp; she looked sad.  Then I asked her to think of a negative event in her life; she smiled brightly and got as strong as a bull.  I was sure I was doing something wrong; so I called over the instructor.  He said, “No you’re doing everything right.  This woman has extreme psychological reversal.  She gets strong in painful situations and weak when things are going well.”

Well I’ll be damned.  I never thought such a thing existed.  Then I realized that I’d seen mild cases of this all my life.  People who “shine in a crisis” or “smile while they suffer” are common.  Often, we label them heroes.

 

Psychological Reversal Begins…

My son was scared as hell on his first roller coaster ride.  At the time, I didn’t know about letting go.  I remember watching his mind work.  He was feeling strong fear, and he was trying to sooth the emotion with words like, “This roller coaster is reliable.  Others have ridden on it and lived.”  In that moment, I saw this normal thought pattern as backwards, false, and ineffective.

In hindsight, I should have asked him to dive into the fear and find the causal belief.  He would have let the cause go.  Then he would have ridden on the roller coaster with a calm joyousness.

We’re all highly trained to sooth, suppress, or numb emotions, and we resist going back and releasing the causal belief.  Our training keeps our false self in tact.  To end psychological reversal, we must break the normal pattern of thought.  The psychologically reversed mind views emotions as proof that their thinking is true.  It’s masterful at soothing the emotions with more thought.

Soothing fixes the problem for now.  Shining in a crisis fixes the problem in the moment.  But it doesn’t fix the causal belief.  Eventually, we’ll be soothing and shining again.  If we have deep psychological reversal and feel pride in our ability to shine in a crisis, we’ll never remove the causal thought.  We’ll fear losing our false purpose and superiority.

When we are not psychologically reversed, we notice that a thought doesn’t feel good, and we drop it.  Healthy, successful people do this naturally all the time.  Usually, they don’t even notice that they do it.

 

The Illusion Needs Psychological Reversal

Psychological reversal is key to making good soldiers, good slaves, and good subordinates.  Feminine roles in the illusion are about obedience and following.  The True Self can’t obey or follow someone who isn’t authentic, truthful, and loving (the true masculine).  The true feminine is about creativity, inspiration, and wisdom.  

When we make followers the good children or decorate soldiers for following orders, we create psychological reversals that are nearly impossible to break.  We create people who ignore their True Self and obey authority because they’re proud of being false selves.  We create people who willingly accept feminine roles that lead to their demise, destruction, or death.  

The false self of psychologically reversed people will fight to the death to make sure the True Self isn’t exposed because it fears annihilation.  The True Self is the enemy in psychological reversal because it won’t follow that which is false — it won’t obey false authority.  It questions them!

If we’re stuck and emotion isn’t moving or our body isn’t healing, the cause is often found in the emotions that we label positive.  Pride, excitement, romance, and hope are all emotions that are labeled positive.  However, emotions are neither positive or negative.  They’re just a signal that we’re thinking something false.  The emotions are a warning that we need to let go.

 

An Example 

Client:   My mother was abusive to me; I can’t forgive her.

Coach:  How does that feel when you think it?

Client:  Terrible

Coach:  So is it true?

Client:  Yes, it’s true. She beat me.

Coach:  It was your reality in the past.  But you aren’t being beaten now.  Your emotion right now is caused by labeling your mother abusive.  Labels aren’t true so they feel bad when we think them.

Client:  But it’s true.  She abused me.

Coach:  Her false self abused you.  In the past, you met her at her false self because you believed something that allowed her to abuse you.  She probably told you that you were bad and deserved punishment, and you believed her because she was your authority.  Then she delivered punishment.

Client:  Yes, she said I was a wise ass; I needed it beaten out of me.

Coach:  Are you a wise ass?

Client:  She thought I was.  I was speaking what I saw; she didn’t like what I said.

Coach:  So you were exposing reality that she wanted to hide.

Client:  Yes, that’s it.

Coach:  Does it feel good to keep the label wise ass?

Client:  Kind of.

Coach:  You’re proud of wise ass, but it isn’t the truth of who you are.  It didn’t feel good when she labeled you wise ass.  So let it go.

 

Client let’s go, and she realizes that her mother is no longer abusive so she’s not a victim anymore.  She’s no longer holding on to her label of wise ass.  Her pride  in being a victim and being a wise ass has disappeared.  Her psychological reversal is gone.

Her mind is now seeing the whole picture clearly, and she is calm.  She realizes that she was only abused because she fell out of her True Self when she believed her mother.  Now she is truly wise; and it couldn’t ever happen again.

 

Projection, Responsibility, Abuse and Letting Go

Responsibility

By Cathy Eck

Sad Stories

The most common emails that I receive are sad stories.  Someone with lots of beliefs and issues, emotionally, psychically, or physically abused the person who wrote to me.  The writer feels stuck because the abuser won’t take responsibility for their actions.  They won’t apologize.  Maybe they won’t even admit that they did anything wrong.  Consequently, the writer can’t seem to leave the pain of the abuse behind.  Often they’re stuck because they’re focusing on the physical event itself instead of the beliefs in their mind before and after the event.

Freedom begins with taking responsibility for everything in OUR mind.  If we accept that we put beliefs in (even if tricked to do so), then we can take those beliefs out.

 

Abusers are usually fragile personalities that are quick to anger and slow to forgive.  Abusers are filled with beliefs.  Emotions arise within them (because of whatever they’re thinking), but they don’t recognize the connection between their thoughts and their emotions.  They’re sure the cause is outside of them.  If you happen to be nearby when they feel emotions, you’re the cause.

Prior to any abuse, abusers always say or imply something that causes their potential victim to lose power.  The abuser claims the masculine role.  If the potential victim believes the abuser, they fall out of their safe True Self into a feminine role within the abuser’s dangerous illusion.

For example:  “Put your hands up or I’ll shoot” is a statement that says, “I’m in charge here, and you’re feminine to me.  You must do whatever I say.”  Since most people are trained to drop into the feminine role on command, the abuser usually succeeds.

The abuser fails when the potential victim doesn’t drop into the feminine.  If the potential victim stays in their True Self, they’re inspired to speak the right words or take the right action to end the abuse.

I recently saw a robbery on television.  A robber walked up to a cashier with a gun and gave a command.  The cashier replied,  “I’ll give you what you want, but you must step over here.”  The cashier didn’t believe the robber’s command; he retained his power and remained calm.  Then the cashier threw a cup of spices in the robber’s eyes.  No one was harmed, and the robber left.  In the interview, the cashier said he was inspired to speak and act — that’s his True Self in control.

For thousands of years, humans have gotten stuck when cast in feminine roles.  Thus, people battle for masculine power.  However, true power comes from our True Self.  Here’s the key to staying in power:

Emotions are always a reaction to our OWN beliefs.  Other people’s emotions are their reaction to their OWN beliefs (not what we did or said).  

 

The robber was emotional.  The cashier recognized that the robber’s emotion-wrapped words weren’t true.  He stayed in his True Self where no one can rob or harm him.

 

The Powerless Feminine Side

We don’t come into the world armed with a rulebook of beliefs because beliefs are false — unreal.  We come in as True Selves.  But, we inevitably trigger the beliefs of authority figures early in life because we don’t know their rules or beliefs.  They punish, shame, or guilt us; or worst of all, they blame us for their emotions.

We accept that blame because they’re our authority figures; we’re supposed to respect and trust them.  We’re now living in their illusion where their beliefs and rules have power.

 

They Won’t Let Go

Many people spend their lives fixing their parent’s illusion.  That won’t lead to freedom.  Other people think they have to wait patiently until their abusers let go, apologize, or die; but that rarely happens.

Look again at our robbery example.  The cashier didn’t wait for the robber to change his mind.  He didn’t try to transform or psychoanalyze the robber.  The cashier simply took responsibility, didn’t accept the command (beliefs) of the robber, and never became feminine to the robber.  He stayed in his True Self, where he remained powerful and safe.

 

Practically Speaking

You go home to your parents for a visit, and your father says, “I don’t want you to move to LA.  I’ll worry.”   What he’s really saying is that you need to do whatever keeps me from feeling emotions.  You recognize that in order for that to happen, you’d have to move into a eight-by-ten cement room with no door.  You want to move to LA, but you don’t want your dad to worry.

At this point, most of us start trying to convince dad that we’ll be safe, and no matter what we say, he doesn’t hear us.  Or we get stern and take over the masculine role and say, “Sorry, I’m grown up now.  I’ll do what I want,”  which causes a power struggle.

What we don’t do is let go first.  Dad’s statement doesn’t feel good.  Therefore it isn’t the truth.  Now he may be a first-class master worrier in the illusion you share with him.  But his True Self doesn’t worry.  So if you let go, you’re not in his illusion anymore.  The conversation must shift.

If inspired, you offer a response after letting go that causes him to join you.  If not, you wait until he says something else.  “Your mother will cry if you aren’t around.”   He’s had some training in the black arts of guilt.  But you notice what he said doesn’t feel good.  You don’t believe it.  You stay in your True Self.  If you stay clear, something will shift in the conversation.  More important, you’ll remain free.

Power games occur only because we allow ourselves to be pulled into another person’s illusion.  Once we’re in it, it looks real.  We can’t be happy in another person’s illusion, and we can’t change their illusion.  But we don’t have to.  We just have to let it go; and return to our perfect life.

 

 

Take Your Foot Off the Brake and Let Go

Foot on Gas, Foot on Brake

By Cathy Eck

 

Just Let Go

Lots of people are exposing lies in the world today.  They’re ripping the mask off of the illusion and exposing reality.  Because of these courageous people, even the most constipated of believers can at least see that “other” people’s beliefs aren’t the truth.  However, they cling to their own beliefs as right.

Consequently, people debate about beliefs, protest beliefs, and kill for their beliefs.  They complain about other people’s beliefs.  And worst of all, they fix the effects of beliefs.  What they don’t do…is let go of the damn beliefs.  Consequently, they’ve got one foot on the gas and one foot on the brake.

Conflict occurs when we talk and act without first letting go.  When we don’t let go first, our mind is fighting another person’s illusory reality within their reality.  They know their reality far better than we do.  It took me a long time to learn this lesson.  Hopefully, I can shortcut it for you.

Our reality is truth plus our beliefs.  If we’re living it, we believe it.  If we’re fighting it, protesting it, or fixing it, we believe it.  So why not let it go?  People hold on because they think their reality is true.  Unless it is perfect, it isn’t.

 

Tolerate or Fight

I grew up thinking that you could tolerate someone’s beliefs, nicely ignore them, or you could go to war with them.  Usually I took the tolerance route until I had children.  Then I couldn’t stand people imposing their beliefs on my children.  I became like a mama tiger.  But that got me into lots of conflict and caused me so much suffering.  I didn’t like fighting.  I wasn’t a great debater either.  I usually lost even if I was technically right.

Eventually, I figured out how to let go.  It was the elixir of life for me.  If someone was sharing a belief that I knew wasn’t true, I noticed the emotion erupting inside of me; instead of using that emotion to go to war, I used the emotion to recognize that what they were saying was false (their reality).  I’d remind myself that it lacked power in my life experience.  I didn’t judge the person; I just didn’t believe them.  Let me tell you, this takes practice.  But it’s worth the effort.

 

An Imaginary Scenario

Believer:  “Guns are my right under the Second Amendment!!! I won’t let anyone take them away!”

Free person notices that what believer said evoked emotion.  They don’t say anything; they just discriminate in their own mind.  Perhaps they think some silent words, “Well that doesn’t feel good.  It isn’t true.”  Notice what happens.  Free person is clearing their own mind (remaining their True Self); there’s no judgment of believer.  If anything, free person sees believer as confused, brainwashed, or afraid — but not bad.

Believer:  “I’m afraid they’ll take my guns.  There will be tyranny.”

Free person again feels emotions reminding them that what believer said was false.  If you could see the energy, you’d see the believer’s comments push his or her emotion toward the listener.  They aren’t feeling their own fear.  They want support for their belief to fuel it.  Free person lets go and returns to True-Self power.  They’re now inspired to speak:  “What are you afraid of?”

Believer:  “The government is evil; it will take my freedom!”

Free person sees their confusion now.  The believer thinks the government is causing his lack of freedom.  In truth, his beliefs are causing his lack of freedom.  The believer now has to feel his own fear.  Free person asks, “Are you sure that the government is evil?”

Believer:  “Yes, my preacher said so.”

Free person sees believer was brainwashed by authority.  The thought arises in free person that they can’t reach believer.  That thought came from their past; it’s a belief and feels bad.  They let go.  Inspired words come to bridge the gap,  “In my experience, people are good to me because I’m good to them.  Aren’t you good to others?”  Free person isn’t believer’s authority; the goal is only to relieve emotional tension.  Free person uses language that will calm the believer.

Believer:  “Yes, I am.”

Free person:  “I’d say you have nothing to worry about.  You’ll never need that gun anyway.”

 

Staying in Power

When we stay in our True-Self power through discrimination and letting go,  others can’t project their emotions on us or confuse us.  Fighting can’t happen when everyone owns their own emotions.  Emotions draw us inward to correct our OWN mind; they’re designed to make us powerless so we self-correct.

Anger and rage are emotions turned outward because we falsely believe that others caused our emotions.  They didn’t.  Our emotions are ALWAYS responding to our OWN thoughts about the other.

When we believe another, we do fall into their illusion; we accept their beliefs as our own.  We might have been conned to accept their beliefs, but we’re the ones holding on to them.

People think they must suppress (tolerate) or express (fight).  They’ve never learned to discriminate (let go).  When we get the warning from our emotions and let go, we stay in power.  Our True Self is nonjudgmental and unconditionally loving.  Unconditional love is the greatest power in the universe.

Sometimes, the believer stops talking or changes the subject.  Other times, they see their own flawed logic and correct their error.  Inspired words often come to the free person to bridge the gap.  People who are board-up-their-ass-rigid believers generally stay away from True Selves.  They think the True Self is evil because they see their own reflection in them.

People have fought over beliefs since history began.  It hasn’t worked.  Others have been tolerating believers and missing out on life.  Neither is acceptable.  When we fight the beliefs of another, we’re driving with one foot on the gas and one foot on the brake.  We get nowhere.  When we see beliefs as false, illusory, we travel full-speed ahead down the superhighway.