What is My Passion?

Ruins of Ephesus

The ruins of Ephesus

By Cathy Eck

 

What’s My Passion?

Lots of books and workshops promise to help us find our passion.  But ultimately there’s a flaw in the very question, “What’s my passion?”  If we have to ask, we’re in our false self.  If our false self hijacks our passion and clones it, we can get really stuck in the illusion.

Many people who appear to have great passion aren’t really authentic.  They’re actually more enthusiastic or excited than passionate.   Some have bought into the idea of “find your passion and get rich.”  The True Self sees it more like “find your true expression and your perfect abundance will come.”  Fear that we might “sell our soul” causes us to keep our True Self hidden until we let go of enough beliefs to assure that our false self won’t steal our dream and ride it for riches or rewards.

 

The Word Passion

We can see the problem by looking at the definition of the word passion.  The first definition is “strong and barely controllable emotion.”  Strong, barely controllable emotion signals a big, fat belief.  The True Self state is calm and peaceful.  It’s the false self that generates strong, uncontrollable emotions.

Passion is often linked with enthusiasm, which traces back to “Greek enthousiasmos, from enthous ‘possessed by a god, inspired.'”  But we have to ask ourselves which God are we possessed by?  The word God has two meanings.  One relates to ancestors or those who came before us.  Ancestors had beliefs and human baggage.  The other definition relates to the all-loving creator God — perfect and void of beliefs.

Pure enthusiasm is calm and inspired; it harms no one.  What most call enthusiasm is actually excitement — hyped up emotion.  When we’re excited, we’re thinking the positive side of a dual thought.  We’re ignoring the opposing twin shadow thought that’s generating the strong, uncontrollable emotional to warn us to stop and let go.  We mistakenly believe the emotion is telling us to charge forward.  Following excitement gets us in big trouble.

The last meaning of passion is connected with the passion of the Christ.  This sort of passion means suffering and death.  If you hold a strong religious perspective, there’s no way in hell that you’re going to allow yourself to find your passion.  Your false self thinks you’ll die.  Good trick huh!

 

Passion as the True Self

If we take the true meaning of Christ, annointed one or initiated one, and add that to the creative, all-loving principal of God, we get a perfect definition of the True Self.  When we live from our True Self, we think pure thoughts and find that whatever we do has a joyful quality to it.  If we have a particular focus that we enjoy, we’ll do it more easily and skillfully because our True Self is leading.  We can even do something that isn’t our thing from our True Self and bring ourself so fully into that activity that we enjoy it.  Now we’re living and breathing pure creative expression every minute of our life.

Oddly, when I’m in that state, I feel that passion is the right word.  It seems that passion fell along with religion.  At one time, people knew that passion wasn’t something you conjured by getting excited about a goal, money, winning, or power.  Passion wasn’t related to suffering or death.  Passion was bringing an idea out of the oneness into the creative palette of the material world — True Self expression.

The initiates understood that hanging on the cross was code for the final initiation test where one became completely feminine to the world so they could see what was left of their masculine false self.  It was an extraordinary feat that required letting go of anything and everything that came their way.  When the false self was gone, they were resurrected — their True Self — living completely in a state of passion.

 

My Own Experience with Passion

When I was about four, I picked up my mother’s Bible and said, “This book is confusing and no one understands it.  I’m going to fix it when I’m big.”  I couldn’t even read the damn thing, but some part of me had the big picture of my life.  I also spent all my time drawing and making things; and I said that I never wanted to do anything else.  I wanted to create stuff.

Then I went off and got lost in the false world.  I didn’t draw or create anymore.  I was as confused by the Bible as everyone else.  But slowly, I remembered how to let go; and the desires and wisdom of my True Self returned.  I’m now doing exactly what I said I would do at four.

I couldn’t have found my True Self with exercises or well-crafted questionnaires.  I needed to let go of the beliefs that veiled my eyes (the false voices in my mind) so I could think clearly and see my path.

Jesus said, “Find ye first the kingdom of heaven, and all else will be added unto you.”  He also said, “Be like little children.”  He was telling us to be our True Self — like we were as children, before falling into the illusion.

The painting above is my latest creative project.  It’s part of the remaining facade  of the library of Ephesus.  Revelations says that the church of Ephesus was a strong church that had patiently borne adversity and couldn’t stand evil.  Their calling (or passion) was to remember their first love.

When we can no longer tolerate the illusion, we choose initiation.  We feel called to be courageous in letting go so that we can find our passion, our first love, our True Self.  If we stay strong and continue on the path of initiation, we eventually realize that we were never lost.  It was all a facade.  The wisdom wasn’t in the library; it was within us.

The Most Powerful Weapon: Guns or Unconditional Love

LGBT Congratulations

By Cathy Eck

 

Guns or Unconditional Love

We live in a crazy time where people who say they love Jesus shout words of hatred to those who are different.  Many of them pack a lot of heat.  It’s hard to know how to handle these types of incongruent people.

The false God of the Old Testament plays loudly in the religious zealot’s mind.  They don’t realize that they’re caught in a bait-and-switch program. They consciously honor Jesus while unconsciously projecting the rules of their false, punishing God on to anyone they feel fits their description of evil.  They don’t seem to notice that Jesus didn’t obey or honor the punishing God, and he didn’t think much of organized religion.

These Christians aren’t Christ-like.  They aren’t “Loving their enemies,” nor are they remembering that Jesus said that what kills us is what comes out of our mouth, not what goes in.  I’m not religious, but I do take the words of Jesus seriously because he speaks the words of initiation.

Fundamentalists might have numbers in their favor, but they have no real power.  We just have to know what to do when we’re in a tough situation with anyone who has a rigid, one-track mind.  Beliefs only have power over us if we believe them; but often, our automatic training causes us to believe people even when what they say feels terrible.  If we can let the belief that is laced with emotion go, we move back into power.

 

The Masculine Side

Let’s examine a conversation between a straight fundamentalist man projecting his beliefs on a gay man.  The fundamentalist says,  “If you keep up your behavior, you’ll go to hell.  The Bible says so.”  We know he’s speaking from beliefs because the words are emotionally charged and not win-win.  They fail both tests of truth.

Forget the words for a moment, and just focus on the emotion.   The speaker does feel the emotion (even if he doesn’t show it), but he believes the emotion is saying he’s right (psychological reversal).  He thinks the gay man is causing his emotion when his own poison words are causing his emotion.  Eventually that emotion will push him to think another thought to elevate his position because he has no concept of letting go.  He’ll think something like, “I’m doing this to help him so he doesn’t go to hell.”   He feels calmer since he now believes that he’s being helpful or kind to the gay man.  But his new statement is still not true — it doesn’t pass the win-win test.

Masculine-oriented minds are pretty accomplished at falsely elevating their position with thought.  They believe that if we’d think like them, everything would be perfect.

 

The Feminine Side

Let’s assume that our gay friend doesn’t consciously have the typical religious good-and-evil world view.  But subconsciously he does, or he wouldn’t have encountered this zealot.  He now has three choices:

In the first choice, he doesn’t discriminate.  He believes what the fundamentalist says because he shares the belief that what feels bad is true.  If our mind has this belief, we’ll be triggered to accept beliefs that are laced with emotion.  That belief shuts off our natural discrimination.  He’ll most likely try to defend himself, but he won’t win because now he’s on the same false playing field as the fundamentalist.  He’s stuck.

In the second choice, he’s a bit wiser.  This time he hears the fundamentalist’s words but realizes that what he just heard isn’t the truth. He recognizes his inner emotional signal to let go.  He doesn’t take on the fundamentalist’s projection or even try to fight him, he just realizes that the fundamentalist is stuck in false thinking.  He’s won the battle, but he hasn’t yet won the war because he remembers the event and the horrible feeling of being judged.  It worries that it could happen again.

He has a third choice if he discovers the power of unconditional love or true forgiving.  True forgiving means to go back to your state of mind before the first giving (the negative incident).  The fundamentalist’s giving was the statement that the gay man was wrong and was going to hell.  To forgive, he must ask himself why he would encounter such a man and get this unwanted gift.  He’s looking for the cause inside of his OWN mind.  Most likely, he believed that if it happened to others, it can happen to him.   Perhaps he also had some religious beliefs of his own that he needs to clean out.  He could have quite a complex of beliefs in his mind that attracted the hater.  If he let’s go of ALL causal beliefs, his power will return.  It’s no longer possible for the fundamentalist to project his beliefs on him.  When authorities can no longer project their evil on others, they’ll all wake up very quickly.

 

Winning With Unconditional Love

The LGBT battle for equality affects us all — it symbolizes the return of the powerful feminine.  The feminine aspect of man and woman became powerless when the patriarchal God was elevated and the Goddess disappeared.  This has caused us all to feel powerless when we are in a feminine role.

A few years ago, I was researching ancient Polynesian stories for a presentation.  I found one story that I really loved.  The story said that humans have long struggled with the problem that the masculine mind gets too power hungry, too righteous, and too war oriented.  At crucial times, large numbers of courageous souls volunteer to come to the planet with feminine minds in male bodies to return peace to earth.  They called them fairies because they thought they were magic.  Their strong feminine mind balances the overly masculine mind of the straight men in power.  Consequently, the birth of gay children was celebrated because they knew that fighting was about to end.  I’m willing to believe that story — it feels really good.

How Do You Fulfill Desires?

How do you get what you want

By Cathy Eck

 

Desires Aren’t the Enemy

According to the ancient initiates, when we live from our True Self, our desires and our thoughts/beliefs become so perfectly congruent that we easily fulfill desires.  But if we live from a fabricated false self, then we try to follow beliefs and fulfill desires of others.  We aren’t naturally equipped to fulfill desires that aren’t our own, so we need hard work or willpower.  It’s our free will choice which way we live.

Most people have a belief system of some sort, and they fulfill desires pretty well if they follow their belief system to the letter.  If we like our beliefs and aren’t harming others, there isn’t a problem with having a belief system.  Overzealous believers, however, often erroneously think their beliefs are the truth.  If others (who aren’t in power) feel damned or stuck in an unsatisfactory life experience when they can’t follow or obey, the believer has gone too far.  They’ve confused beliefs with the truth.  That’s where letting go comes in to save the nonbelievers.

A good way to find out what you still believe (and it might surprise you) is to ask yourself:  “How do I fulfill desires?”  Here are some popular answers:

 

Sky God

Is an outside God in the sky the grantor of your wishes and keeper of your destiny?  Some treat God (or Jesus) like a concierge.  If God deems them deserving, they fulfill desires.  If sky God is your answer, then the next question to ask is how does God decide if you’re deserving?  Often when people answer this question, they realize that God’s rules are exactly like their parent’s and early authority figure’s rules.  This belief also becomes transparent when you realize that atheists tend to fulfill desires too.

 

Hard Work 

Most westerners have some hard-work ethic in them.  If we believe that hard work fulfills desires, then we can’t do something we love and get rewarded.  We have to make everything hard or convince others that we’re suffering enough to deserve a reward.  Also, we discover that some things can’t be created or fixed with hard work — we reach the limit of our belief system.  Hard work doesn’t create great ideas.  No amount of hard work can cure something labeled incurable.  The True Self creates in ways that are simple and easy.

 

Positive Thinking

When people realize that thoughts fulfill desires, they’re usually horrified at what they’ve been thinking.  They’ve accepted lots of beliefs.  They see that their mind is conditioned to accept things that feel terrible without discriminating.

Occultists and magicians realized long ago that emotional people were easy to deceive; they used that to their advantage.  Those in power still create problems to generate emotion in others.  While everyone is distracted in their emotional confusion, the people in power do whatever they want.  Pay attention, you’ll see this pattern wherever problems exist.

 

Karma

In the west, we say, “What goes around comes around”  — the western version of karma.  Originally, karma was based on the understanding that when you create in the illusion, you get both sides of duality.  Pretty and ugly, rich and poor, or war and tolerance go together like two sides of a coin.

Even when we only identify with one side of duality, we get the other as a bonus unconsciously.  The side we’re not identified with is projected out on to others, and it does come back to us in time.  Other people eventually return our projections.  Letting go resolves karma because it gets rid of projected duality.

 

Obedience, Being Good

Some believe that if they are good or obedient, they’ll get what they want.  They’re often very frustrated when they see that others aren’t good (by their standards) and they, too, fulfill desires.  When we obey authority or another’s belief system, we’re disobeying our True Self.  When we let go, we come to see that our True Self fulfills desires, not authority.

 

Magical Thinking

There are all kinds of magical belief schemes to fulfill desires from four-leaf clovers to mind games.  Some people actually worry to fulfill desires.  Others think they protect themselves with fear.  There are superstitions, guardian angels, and fairies.  All of these are mind tricks that work sometimes when you believe them because they are long-standing thought forms.  But they aren’t foolproof and most people don’t know why they work when they do or why they eventually fail them.

 

Willpower

People use willpower to fulfill desires in any number of physical or mental ways.  Willpower overpowers strong beliefs.  Old-fashioned willpower benefits from the group mind — mafia, KKK, or religion.  But visualization or affirmations are also forms of willpower. Underneath the use of willpower of any kind is the belief that one lacks real power.  They need to force their desires to manifest.

 

What’s the Answer?

Everyone has a unique mix of how they fulfill desires.  Religion, upbringing, culture, personal history, and teachers all give us beliefs.   Beliefs tend to be unpredictable keeping us in a state of confusion.

If you’re an atheist, God isn’t part of your answer.  Some cultures treat willpower as crucial to fulfill desires; others find it rude.  If you believe in the luck of the Irish, a four-leaf clover is an asset.  If you’re raised on superstition, you’ll create problems by breaking a mirror.  In the illusion, beliefs rule; and those who know and follow their own belief rulebook do well.  Those who let go do better.

There are also some belief trump cards like being born to royalty.  Being told you’re chosen is like winning the lottery of beliefs.  When we let go, even these wide-standing beliefs don’t limit us.

 

The Great Equalizer

The great equalizer is the power of letting go.  According to the ancient initiates, when your mind is clear or virgin, you think a desire once; then you fulfill it by following your inspiration.  When no beliefs block our desire fulfillment process, we’ve returned to the Garden of Eden.  

Courage, Acceptance, and Peace

courage, acceptance, and peace

By Cathy Eck

 

Peace, The Ultimate State 

Lester Levinson was an American who found his way to a free mind about half a century ago.  His journey was my validation when I couldn’t find anyone to confirm my inner and outer research.  Lester said that three words defined his state of mind:  courage, acceptance, and peace.  As I let go of my own beliefs and misperceptions, I realized that Lester’s perception of those words wasn’t the norm.

Lester said that the final state of mind was imperturbability, peace.  Followers of Lester worked to release emotions since their emotions perturbed them.  They couldn’t see that Lester’s calmness and peace came from his True Self perspective of no beliefs.  When we have no beliefs, we have no emotions.

Many words that describe the path to freedom or the True Self have been hijacked by the false self.  We can’t just memorize the new definition of these words and use them to elevate our false self — that gets us really stuck.  But we can use these words as guideposts to let us know that we’re progressing.

 

Courage

The True Self is inwardly courageous.  The True Self lives from true and false.  If a belief arises that isn’t true and emotions erupt, it’s unstoppable in facing that emotion and finding and releasing the causal belief.  It can stand up to any person or situation without loss of power — not to fight them, but to free them.

Courage isn’t the same as bravery.  Brave people are filled with beliefs.  Brave people charge into battle to kill their projected enemies.  True courage is about realizing that the battle or enemy is illusory.  True courage allows us to admit that our perception was false.  True courage can let go of the label of victim and its false payoffs.  It takes courage to remember that the truth will set you free.  It takes tremendous courage to tell the truth to ourself and others when we fear we’ll be judged.

As we travel the path to freedom, our perspective improves each time we let go of a belief or misperception.  Things that used to appear true and powerful now look weak.  It upsets us when we realize we’ve been following a weak leader (false authority).  Often people try to shore the leader up instead of letting them fall.  Courage lets them fall if it leads to greater freedom.

 

Acceptance

In the illusion, people use the term acceptance when they mean apathy.  Apathy is when you let go of your desires instead of your beliefs because you don’t believe you can have them.

Acceptance to a True Self isn’t about accepting loss, disease, or problems.  It’s about accepting the flow of joy, health, and unconditional love that is natural.  The flow of life force is eternal once there are no beliefs damming up the stream.

People often say, “I’m accepting what is.”  That isn’t true acceptance — that’s giving up — apathy.  They’re protecting the false notion that God gives us problems, tempts us, and challenges us.  But that isn’t true.  God doesn’t give us problems or challenges, people do.  The people running our life are the people whose beliefs we still hold in OUR mind.  If we “accept what is” while marinating in their illusion, we’re letting their beliefs run our life.  Thus, acceptance is really apathy because we lack the courage to let go.  If you’re following a loving person, false acceptance might improve your situation temporarily.  But true freedom is being the master of your own life, not accepting another’s illusion.

If you have no desires and get nothing, you’ll die.  When people say that Buddhists are desireless, I remind them that the fundamentalist Buddhists would be up shit creek without a paddle without their begging bowls.  They want people to feed them — that’s desire.  People make them superior and then try to copy their illusion; then suddenly they’re stuck in lack.

Acceptance is natural when you’re living as your True Self because what you want is right for you; beliefs no longer stop your desire from flowing to you.  You seem desireless to others because your desires manifest so quickly that you never long for them.  That’s true acceptance.

 

Peace

Peace is another word that has been hijacked by the false self.  Peace is not the opposite of war.  Tolerance is the opposite of war.  You either fight with someone or you tolerate them at the bottom of the triangle.  Peace is the state where war and tolerance are viewed as false, illusory.

In the illusion, people pretend their enemy doesn’t exist with fake forgiveness.   They face their fears outwardly with bravery, or they stop fighting under the guise of pacifism.  But we’re not in peace if we’re still seeing the other as bad or wrong.

Peace is the effect when we remember our True Self’s unconditionally-loving perspective because we’re in the flow of our life.  What we think is what manifests; and we think nothing that would harm another or ourselves.  When we have no more inner wars, outer wars and outer warriors appear false and powerless.

 

Courage + Acceptance = Peace

Courage enables us to live from true and false in a world that is built on an illusion of good and evil or win and lose.  We’re fearless in facing our own emotions and following them until we find the causal belief.  We aren’t afraid to let go of beliefs.

Acceptance allows our desires to flow into our life effortlessly.  Acceptance can allow beliefs in others, but it doesn’t obey or follow people with beliefs.

Peace is the effect, our natural free state of mind when we live from our True Self.  We no longer have beliefs; therefore, we no longer have emotions.  Peace comes from knowing that we’re safe, we’re in control of our life experience, we can have what we need and want (what’s true for us), and we’re unconditionally loved.  Put these together and we know and live from our True Self.  We are free.

Seeing Events from the True Self Perspective

The True Self Perspective

By Cathy Eck

 

Letting Go

Letting go is so very simple … too simple for our complicated, modern minds.  People analyze their mind, talk about it, and contemplate it.  Those are tools that fuel the false self.  You can’t fix the false mind, you have to let it go.

You can’t get to the True Self perspective by way of the false self.   No belief system will take you to your True Self.  The True Self has no beliefs.  At best, belief systems create a nice clone of the True Self.

If you want complete, permanent freedom, you must let go of the false mind.  To do that you must know this:

All beliefs are lies (the word lie is buried within the word belief for a reason). Beliefs that are judgmental or harmful to yourself or another generate emotion.  That emotion is saying, “Let the belief go.”

 

When you let go of beliefs, only the True Self perspective remains.  All emotional charge is gone because you’ve eliminated the false.  If you are ill, healing can now take place.

 

An Example

It’s rarely the big events in our life that confuse us — those are obviously wrong.  It’s the little events that often trap us in the false world of beliefs.

When I was about four years old, my grandparents were driving on a Sunday afternoon; they stopped by our home unexpected.  My mother had planned a simple dinner; but now that my father’s parents were visiting, she got out the china and made a nice dinner.  However, she didn’t have anything for dessert because we didn’t usually eat dessert.  She whipped up some Jello; and when she served it, my grandmother said, “Jello, that isn’t dessert!”

My dad was dumbfounded, and my mother ran off crying.  I sympathized with my mother — big mistake.  I rubbed her back and talked to her like I was the mother and she the child.

I’d often contemplated that moment with lots of whys.  Why did my grandmother say that?  Why did my grandmother’s comment upset my mother so much?  Why didn’t my father defend my mother?  Why did it still bother me decades later?

The answer to the last question is that I hadn’t yet seen the memory from the True Self perspective.  We hold memories in mind, along with the emotions they generate, until we see them from the True Self perspective — free of beliefs.  If a memory has no beliefs, it has no emotion.  It feels like a dream when we think it.  It has no future attracting power.

 

Slow Motion

I went back to the event and replayed it in very slow motion.  I didn’t try to fix the event or change it…it was what it was.  I saw it this time with the single eye of truth.  My grandmother said, “Jello, that isn’t dessert.”  That felt neutral to me and probably to my dad.  My mother, however, heard the same words and a belief arose in her mind that generated emotion.

My mother was now deep in psychological reversal.  She went into an old pattern of low self-worth, not good enough for my dad, or just plain bad.  What she was thinking clearly felt bad to her, but she took that emotion as a sign that her belief was true.  That error in her thinking was the cause of all her pain.  It’s the primal error that keeps the illusion alive in all of us.

As a four-year old, I believed my mother; so I fell into her illusion with her.  Sympathy does that — that’s why it’s considered good in the illusory world.  My fall into her illusion was the cause of my emotional pain.

At the time, my mind said, “My grandmother hurt my mother.”  I believed it as a child.  But now, it didn’t feel good, so I let it go.  Remember letting go is moving out of right and wrong so this isn’t about whether Jello is or isn’t a dessert or whether my grandmother was socially correct.  In truth, my grandmother spoke words and triggered an old wound in my mother.  In truth, my grandmother didn’t hurt my mother, she exposed a belief in my mother.

Then I thought, “Why didn’t my father defend my mother?”  Now I noticed that under my question was a judgment that he should have defended her; that felt bad too.  All should’s feel bad.  Defending isn’t necessary for a True Self.  If my mother wasn’t lost in her baggage, she probably would have laughed and said, “I’ve got your fat son on a diet.”  Then my dad would have had to deal with his beliefs.  At which point, he’d probably have pointed out that my grandmother already had enough dessert on her fat ass.  Everyone at the table had wounds, and it was only a matter of who’s wound got exposed first.

In most situations, the one who blows the fuse is the one with the most inward-directed beliefs because they’re the most sensitive.  We often call them the black sheep.

If my mother had desired freedom (instead of looking good), she would have used that exposure to find her own emotional pain’s causal belief.  My grandmother exposed her wound; she didn’t cause it.  She did, however, have responsibility for the Jello since she created a chubby son.

The voice that says “You hurt me,” is from the false self.  The True Self knows that if something that someone says feels bad, it just isn’t true.  The person who said it isn’t evil, they’re just stuck in a false belief system.  Thus if you get rid of the false self, you no longer believe other false selves.

This little example shows how we undo our psychological reversals.  Once I let go of my OWN erroneous beliefs, I could see the memory clearly.  Now I saw the simple solution that my wounded family couldn’t see — the Dairy Queen at the top of the hill.

The Agony of Psychological Reversal

Psychological reversal

By Cathy Eck

 

Understanding psychological reversal is key to freeing our mind.  We’re all psychologically reversed in the areas of our life that don’t work perfectly.

 

What’s Psychological Reversal?

Years ago, I took a muscle testing class.  There was one woman in the class that creeped me out.  Lucky me; the instructor paired me with this creepy woman.  I was going to discover why she felt creepy.

When I asked her to think of a happy time, her arm went limp; she looked sad.  Then I asked her to think of a negative event in her life; she smiled brightly and got as strong as a bull.  I was sure I was doing something wrong; so I called over the instructor.  He said, “No you’re doing everything right.  This woman has extreme psychological reversal.  She gets strong in painful situations and weak when things are going well.”

Well I’ll be damned.  I never thought such a thing existed.  Then I realized that I’d seen mild cases of this all my life.  People who “shine in a crisis” or “smile while they suffer” are common.  Often, we label them heroes.

 

Psychological Reversal Begins…

My son was scared as hell on his first roller coaster ride.  At the time, I didn’t know about letting go.  I remember watching his mind work.  He was feeling strong fear, and he was trying to sooth the emotion with words like, “This roller coaster is reliable.  Others have ridden on it and lived.”  In that moment, I saw this normal thought pattern as backwards, false, and ineffective.

In hindsight, I should have asked him to dive into the fear and find the causal belief.  He would have let the cause go.  Then he would have ridden on the roller coaster with a calm joyousness.

We’re all highly trained to sooth, suppress, or numb emotions, and we resist going back and releasing the causal belief.  Our training keeps our false self in tact.  To end psychological reversal, we must break the normal pattern of thought.  The psychologically reversed mind views emotions as proof that their thinking is true.  It’s masterful at soothing the emotions with more thought.

Soothing fixes the problem for now.  Shining in a crisis fixes the problem in the moment.  But it doesn’t fix the causal belief.  Eventually, we’ll be soothing and shining again.  If we have deep psychological reversal and feel pride in our ability to shine in a crisis, we’ll never remove the causal thought.  We’ll fear losing our false purpose and superiority.

When we are not psychologically reversed, we notice that a thought doesn’t feel good, and we drop it.  Healthy, successful people do this naturally all the time.  Usually, they don’t even notice that they do it.

 

The Illusion Needs Psychological Reversal

Psychological reversal is key to making good soldiers, good slaves, and good subordinates.  Feminine roles in the illusion are about obedience and following.  The True Self can’t obey or follow someone who isn’t authentic, truthful, and loving (the true masculine).  The true feminine is about creativity, inspiration, and wisdom.  

When we make followers the good children or decorate soldiers for following orders, we create psychological reversals that are nearly impossible to break.  We create people who ignore their True Self and obey authority because they’re proud of being false selves.  We create people who willingly accept feminine roles that lead to their demise, destruction, or death.  

The false self of psychologically reversed people will fight to the death to make sure the True Self isn’t exposed because it fears annihilation.  The True Self is the enemy in psychological reversal because it won’t follow that which is false — it won’t obey false authority.  It questions them!

If we’re stuck and emotion isn’t moving or our body isn’t healing, the cause is often found in the emotions that we label positive.  Pride, excitement, romance, and hope are all emotions that are labeled positive.  However, emotions are neither positive or negative.  They’re just a signal that we’re thinking something false.  The emotions are a warning that we need to let go.

 

An Example 

Client:   My mother was abusive to me; I can’t forgive her.

Coach:  How does that feel when you think it?

Client:  Terrible

Coach:  So is it true?

Client:  Yes, it’s true. She beat me.

Coach:  It was your reality in the past.  But you aren’t being beaten now.  Your emotion right now is caused by labeling your mother abusive.  Labels aren’t true so they feel bad when we think them.

Client:  But it’s true.  She abused me.

Coach:  Her false self abused you.  In the past, you met her at her false self because you believed something that allowed her to abuse you.  She probably told you that you were bad and deserved punishment, and you believed her because she was your authority.  Then she delivered punishment.

Client:  Yes, she said I was a wise ass; I needed it beaten out of me.

Coach:  Are you a wise ass?

Client:  She thought I was.  I was speaking what I saw; she didn’t like what I said.

Coach:  So you were exposing reality that she wanted to hide.

Client:  Yes, that’s it.

Coach:  Does it feel good to keep the label wise ass?

Client:  Kind of.

Coach:  You’re proud of wise ass, but it isn’t the truth of who you are.  It didn’t feel good when she labeled you wise ass.  So let it go.

 

Client let’s go, and she realizes that her mother is no longer abusive so she’s not a victim anymore.  She’s no longer holding on to her label of wise ass.  Her pride  in being a victim and being a wise ass has disappeared.  Her psychological reversal is gone.

Her mind is now seeing the whole picture clearly, and she is calm.  She realizes that she was only abused because she fell out of her True Self when she believed her mother.  Now she is truly wise; and it couldn’t ever happen again.

 

Exposing the Wolf In Sheep’s Clothing

Wolf in Sheep's Clothing

By Cathy Eck

 

Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing Persona

A lot of people were really bothered by Ariel Castro — they should be.  He represents the wolf in sheep’s clothing.   This type of abuser is doing most of the damage in the world today.  The wolf in sheep’s clothing is actually quite common and often has authority and power in the illusion.

The wolf in sheep’s clothing looks good on the outside, but he or she hides a dark shadow underneath their sweet, kind, often intelligent, persona.  The wolf in sheep’s clothing keeps abusing sheep because people are afraid to expose the wolf.  We’re taught that goodness is measured by what you do, what you say, and how you look.  Those things can all be faked.

It’s not nice to question someone’s words or integrity, even when they give clues that we should.  The wolf is often a very good clone of the True Self.  However, the wolf has a shadow.  The True Self casts no shadow.

Clever wolves know how to speak falsehood without showing emotion.  Like news reporters, they can tell a horrible story with an absolute calm, controlled demeanor.  It’s no wonder that people get so emotional watching the news.  When the person in the masculine role (the reporter) doesn’t experience their own emotions, the listener (in the feminine role) does.  This has been a trick of the power-hungry for thousands of years.

Others disguise their emotions as charisma.  We treat their emotions as a sign of enthusiasm.  But their emotions are really a sign that they’re showering us with their beliefs — not the truth.

People willingly give their power to these master manipulators.  They trust them completely.  They never expose them.  And worst of all, when they feel emotional around these wolves in sheep’s clothing, they assume there’s something wrong with them.  They don’t suspect the calm and nice (or charismatic) wolf in sheep’s clothing.

When people speak from truth, they cast no shadow.  When people speak from falsehood, they always cast a shadow.  Often you can’t see their shadow, but you can feel it.

 

We Believe Them Without Question

When these wolves in sheep’s clothing speak, we believe them.  We ignore our emotions because these people generate constant emotion.  We focus on their words or appearance, which are always socially correct.  When we realize we’ve been blindsided, we wonder how we could have missed the clues.

We don’t realize that the problems that wolves share, the warnings they give us, and the hope, excitement, or terror they inspire in us isn’t real.  They’re simply giving us a report of their OWN illusion.  When we believe them, we get lost in their false world.  And we’re never powerful in another person’s illusion.

We can see this playing out in the United States.  An illusion of fear and terror took flight with the Bush administration (9/11).  Recently, people have commented that Obama is sounding and acting more and more like Bush.  He’s clearly stuck in Bush’s fear-based illusion.  He thought he could fix it with hope and change.  But hope and change are powerless in another person’s illusion.

The wolf in sheep’s clothing is everywhere.  Leaders at all levels pass on their illusions because they believe them.  We’re brainwashed to trust authority without question.  No one fixes the cause (let’s go of the causal beliefs) because they believe the illusion that was passed down to them is true.

 

Responsibility is Key

We’ve all fallen into this trap.  Most people live their whole life in their parent’s illusion.  Most live in their country’s illusion and in the world’s illusion.  People live in their religion’s illusion.  No one is living THEIR life.

We try to fix our childhood or our country or world because we believe what we see.  Fixing the illusion only makes it even more real and powerful.  Fixing the effect of illusory beliefs is equal to not fixing anything at all.

When we stop fixing illusions and instead see the beliefs that we accepted or the false conclusions we made as our responsibility, we can expose and eliminate them.  We can clearly see that it was all just an illusion.  Neither a dream, illusion, nor a wolf in sheep’s clothing have any power once we realize that they’re false.

Obama is treating Bush’s illusion as if it’s true.  He’s trying to fix it, and he can’t. No one can fix another person’s illusion, but we can see it as false.  We can dissolve it with the truth.

A great leader isn’t someone who fixes illusory problems.  A great leader is someone who sees the truth behind problems.  A great leaders takes responsibility, finds the causal beliefs, and dissolves illusions.  They don’t blame others.  They discriminate between true and false.  And they don’t project their OWN false beliefs or make their illusions our reality.

We need great leaders at all levels of life — parents, teachers, government, religion.  We must stop believing leaders that are vested in religions, big business, or political parties.  Their eyes are veiled with their illusions, and they can’t lead.  Knowledge of the system doesn’t make one a leader; clear vision does.  When people see problems as real, their vision is clouded.  They can’t lead, even when their intentions are good.

 

Listening With Our Bodies

The wolf in sheep’s clothing will lose power when people start listening with their bodies and trusting their emotions to discriminate.  The truth always sounds and feels good and calm.

Start listening to news, television advertisements, or political speeches with your body.  Listen with your body even when talking to friends or family.  You’ll see how much falsehood you’ve accepted.  You’ll start to recognize the wolf in sheep’s clothing before they trap you.

When we discriminate and let go, we retain our power.  The speaker’s emotions stay with them; they lose their false power naturally.  No one can deceive a True Self.  When people discriminate, the wolf in sheep’s clothing must take off their mask because the sheep won’t follow them anymore.